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Re: [allthingshistory] Napoleon's Lost Army

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  • Joan Griffith
    Once one strikes, you are open to the others. Does not make much difference once you fall in the snow, if you are delirious from typhus or weak from
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 30, 2009
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      Once one strikes, you are open to the others. Does not make much difference once you fall in the snow, if you are delirious from typhus or weak from starvation. Dysentery often was amoebic, not just a few hours of diarrhea; I think of it as cholera--victims could be saved if they were given a lot of fluids and tended carefully, but it was not really possible during the retreat.  It would seem that gathering so many men in one place (the army) allowed a number of illnesses to strike and spread fast.

      Joan
      A handful of patience is worth more than a  bushel of brains.~~Dutch Proverb


      On Thu, Jul 30, 2009 at 8:09 AM, John D. Beatty <jdbeatty@...> wrote:
       

      Typhus: 50%
      Exposure:50%
      Starvation: 30%
      Dysentery: 20%
      Combat action: <10%

      Note that the first four casualty creators overlap a great deal, just as AIDS, malaria and malnutrition do in Africa as we speak.  One cause feeds another until the "cause" of death is indeterminate. 

      For instance, a sick and starving French soldier falls out of the march and is too weak to defend himself against a band of Cossacks trailing the army, whereupon he is captured and dies of exposure on the march away.  What killed him?

      Russia killed him, the totality of her conditions, as the Swedes already knew and the Germans would find out soon enough.  Causality is too complicated to pint a finger at just one.

      ___________________________
      John D. Beatty
      Co-Author of "What Were They Thinking" from Merriam Press/Lulu
      "History is our only test for the consequences of ideas"



      -------- Original Message --------
      Subject: [allthingshistory] Napoleon's Lost Army
      From: Joan Griffith <despinne@...>
      Date: Wed, July 29, 2009 2:29 am
      To: allthingshistory <allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com>

       
      We've been told Napoleon's soldiers died from the cold of the severe Russian winter, but in fact, that was after they fell to the side of the road, dying of typhus.

      http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/0,1518,638751,00.html

      Joan
      When I play with my cat, who knows if I am not a pastime to her, more than she is to me?~~Montaigne


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