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Two naval history finds

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  • robert-blau@webtv.net
    Interesting . . . Divers discover wreck of ship sent to help Bonnie Prince Charlie The Telegraph [UK], 26 May 2009 Researchers have started an underwater
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 1, 2009
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      Interesting . . .

      Divers discover wreck of ship sent to help Bonnie Prince Charlie
      The Telegraph [UK], 26 May 2009

      Researchers have started an underwater excavation project at the site of
      an 18th Century vessel that foundered off Anglesey and is thought to
      have been carrying gold and supplies from the King of France. It is
      thought the ship dates from the time that the Young Pretender was hiding
      on the Scottish Islands after the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745. Kevin
      McCormac, a professional diver, was exploring the seabed off Porth
      Dafarch Beach on Holy Island, when he uncovered a tiny copper disc. The
      disc was found more than fifteen years ago and was initially dismissed
      as a worthless coin. Microscopic examination showed it is an identical
      duplicate of the seal on the signet ring worn by Mary Queen of Scots at
      her execution. That priceless ring is kept at The British Museum. The
      fact that this unique seal was recovered from the site of a wreck,
      together with historical research, suggests it may have be carried on
      one of several privateer vessels sent by Louis XV of France, to supply
      or rescue Charles Edward Stewart "Bonnie Prince Charlie", in the
      aftermath of his defeat at the Battle of Culloden in 1745.

      http://snipr.com/j1vwe

      Excavation at Haslar reveals horror of life in Nelson's navy
      The News [UK], 29 May 2009

      An excavation of a former military hospital graveyard has revealed the
      harrowing deaths of some sailors from Nelson's navy. The dig is being
      carried out in the grounds of the Royal Hospital Haslar in Gosport,
      where the unmarked graves date back to 1755. The work, which is being
      filmed for a Channel 4 Time Team documentary, is to reveal what life was
      like in the navy hundreds of years ago. A total of 29 skeletons will
      have been carefully removed and analysed by Sunday, when the excavation
      comes to a close. Some of the incredible cases that have been revealed
      so far include a skeleton from a man in his mid-20s, which has seven
      broken bones, a broken jaw and one side of his skull smashed. Analysis
      from the team of 60 who have been working on the project shows he would
      have survived in hospital for about three months being fed through a
      straw before passing away from an infection.

      http://snipr.com/j1ux0
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