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Fw: ] The History Of Halloween

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  • wolfie
    ... The History Of Halloween http://www.ghostsamongus.net/v2/Content/pid=23.html The History Of Halloween 10/1/08 With Halloween just around the corner, I
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 2, 2008
       
       
      -------
       
      The History Of Halloween

      http://www.ghostsam ongus.net/ v2/Content/ pid=23.html
       
      The History Of Halloween
      10/1/08

      With Halloween just around the corner, I
      thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
      and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

      The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
      is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
      which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
      nothing to do with Christianity.

      Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
      years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
      known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
      November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
      of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
      the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
      the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
      to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
      consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
      attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
      easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
      was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
      symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
      they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
      culminating their celebration.

      After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
      incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
      known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
      the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
      (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
      apples originated from.
      How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
      and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
      Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
      Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
      and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
      to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
      celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
      October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
      days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
      up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
      before.

      According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
      when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
      when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
      on this night and consorting with the devil.

      Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
      adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
      ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
      mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
      'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
      turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
      faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
      adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
      traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
      decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

      Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
      century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
      1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
      was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
      cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
      1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
      30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
      pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

      Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
      visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
      for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
      continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
       
      wolfie
       
    • Joan Griffith
      Love the way you describe all the dead etc. and then say it is a cheerful festival. Joan ... -- Joan Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought
      Message 2 of 18 , Oct 2, 2008
        Love the way you describe all the dead etc. and then say it is a cheerful festival. 
        Joan

        On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@...> wrote:

         
         
        -------
         
        The History Of Halloween

        http://www.ghostsamongus.net/v2/Content/pid=23.html
         
        The History Of Halloween
        10/1/08

        With Halloween just around the corner, I
        thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
        and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

        The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
        is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
        which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
        nothing to do with Christianity.

        Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
        years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
        known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
        November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
        of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
        the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
        the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
        to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
        consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
        attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
        easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
        was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
        symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
        they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
        culminating their celebration.

        After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
        incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
        known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
        the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
        (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
        apples originated from.
        How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
        and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
        Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
        Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
        and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
        to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
        celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
        October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
        days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
        up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
        before.

        According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
        when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
        when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
        on this night and consorting with the devil.

        Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
        adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
        ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
        mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
        'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
        turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
        faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
        adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
        traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
        decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

        Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
        century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
        1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
        was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
        cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
        1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
        30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
        pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

        Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
        visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
        for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
        continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
         
        wolfie
         




        --
        Joan
        Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
      • Joan Griffith
        By comparison, here is an alternative observance by Jewish kids in Israel, a story from Israel National News in 2007. Tonight,( a few) Jewish youth all over
        Message 3 of 18 , Oct 2, 2008
          By comparison, here is an alternative observance by Jewish kids in Israel, a story from Israel National News in 2007.

           Tonight,( a few) Jewish youth all over the world – except in Israel – will celebrate the pagan holiday of Halloween.
           Halloween is also called All Hallows' Eve, because, for the gentiles, it is a hallowed evening, the eve of All Saints' Day, a day which honors all Christian saints. The Encyclopedia Britannica explains that in ancient Britain and Ireland, the Festival of Halloween was a also celebration of the end of the fertile period of the Celtic goddess Eiseria. It is said that when Eiseria reaches the end of her fertile cycle the worlds of the dead and the living intertwine. This supposedly happens on October 31. Masks are worn to show respect for the Goddess Eiseria who, like most Celtic gods, does not wish to be seen by human eyes.
          This date was also New Year's Eve in both Celtic and Anglo-Saxon times, and was the occasion for one of the ancient fire festivals when huge bonfires were set on hilltops to frighten away evil spirits. The souls of the dead were supposed to revisit their homes on this day, and the festival acquired sinister significance, with ghosts, witches, hobgoblins, black cats, fairies, and demons of all kinds said to be roaming about. It was the time to placate the supernatural powers controlling the processes of nature. In addition, Halloween was thought to be the most favorable time for divinations concerning marriage, luck, health, and death. It was the only day on which the help of the devil was invoked for such purposes. These pagan observances also influenced the Christian festival of All Hallows' Eve, celebrated on the same date.
          Jewish Law states: "A Jew should not follow the customs of the gentiles, nor imitate them in dress, or in their way of trimming their hair, as it says, 'You shall not walk in the customs of the nation which I cast out before you' (Lev. 20:23), and 'Neither shall you walk in their statutes' (Lev. 18:3). These verses all refer to one and the same matter of not imitating them. A Jew, on the contrary, should be distinguished from them and recognizable by the way he dresses, and in his other activities, just as he is distinguished from them in his knowledge and his beliefs, as it is said, 'I have set you apart from the peoples' (Lev. 20:26)." (See, Rambam, Laws Regarding Idol Worship and the Ordinances of the Gentiles, 11:1).
          When it comes to the question whether Jews can take part in gentile holidays,  the halachic discussion differs between clearly religious holidays like Xmas, which are forbidden, and purely secular holidays like Labor Day, which are permissible. Halloween's religious origins and pagan history place it in the category of gentile holidays that are forbidden to celebrate. Though Halloween in America has been secularized and commercialized to the point where it is now a frivolous time of costumes, candy, and pranks, it is still celebrated in places like Scotland and Ireland as a Celtic festival of the spirits, and in other places as a holiday honoring the Christian saints. Therefore "Trick or Treating" is a no-no for Jewish children.
          The law prohibiting our participation in gentile holidays and customs comes to protect our special Jewish holiness and cultural distinction. If you allow your kids to participate in the pagan rites of a gentile culture, they will grow up with pumpkin heads instead of Jewish heads.
          On the other hand, if you try to safeguard our distinction as Jews and not let your children go "Trick or Treating" with all the other kids in the neighborhood , they will grow up hating both you and Judaism for turning them into freaks in the eyes of their friends. Either way, as a parent, you lose.
          What's the solution? Move to Israel. The only place you will see a pumpkin here is in the supermarket (a small yellow one that looks more like a squash). If you truly love your children and don't want them growing up with pumpkin heads, then the only solution is to bring them to Israel where they will grow up like Jews without hating both you and the Torah.
          To illustrate, today my nine-year old son went on a class trip to Hevron in honor of  this Shabbat's Torah portion, "Chaya Sarah," which recounts how our forefather, Avraham, purchased the Cave of the Machplah and the surrounding field for a burial site for his family. Since Hevron is the City of our Forefathers, fathers were invited to come along. So while Jewish kids in the Diaspora were trying on their Goblin and Spiderman Halloween costumes, my son was treated to an educational tour of Hevron, the world's oldest Jewish city.
          Who is more likely to grow up with a Jewish head – the Jewish kids in the Diaspora who go "trick or treating" with the goyim, or the Israeli kids who spend the day learning about their Jewish forefathers and praying in the Cave of the Patriarchs?  
          If there is any doubt in your mind, it may be because you went "trick or treating" yourself.


          On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@...> wrote:

           
           
          -------
           
          The History Of Halloween

          http://www.ghostsamongus.net/v2/Content/pid=23.html
           
          The History Of Halloween
          10/1/08

          With Halloween just around the corner, I
          thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
          and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

          The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
          is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
          which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
          nothing to do with Christianity.

          Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
          years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
          known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
          November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
          of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
          the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
          the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
          to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
          consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
          attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
          easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
          was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
          symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
          they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
          culminating their celebration.

          After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
          incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
          known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
          the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
          (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
          apples originated from.
          How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
          and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
          Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
          Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
          and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
          to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
          celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
          October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
          days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
          up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
          before.

          According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
          when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
          when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
          on this night and consorting with the devil.

          Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
          adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
          ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
          mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
          'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
          turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
          faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
          adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
          traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
          decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

          Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
          century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
          1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
          was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
          cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
          1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
          30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
          pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

          Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
          visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
          for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
          continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
           
          wolfie
           




          --
          Joan
          Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
        • wolfie
          I didnt say it, just forwarded it. Got the link it came from posted on the send. wolfie ... From: Joan Griffith Date: 10/2/2008 8:33:06 PM To:
          Message 4 of 18 , Oct 2, 2008
            I didnt say it, just forwarded it.  Got the link it came from posted on the send.
             
            wolfie 
             
            -------Original Message-------
             
            Date: 10/2/2008 8:33:06 PM
            Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
             
            Love the way you describe all the dead etc. and then say it is a cheerful festival. 
            Joan

            On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@...> wrote:

             
             
            -------
             
            The History Of Halloween

            http://www.ghostsamongus.net/v2/Content/pid=23.html
             
            The History Of Halloween
            10/1/08

            With Halloween just around the corner, I
            thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
            and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

            The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
            is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
            which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
            nothing to do with Christianity.

            Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
            years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
            known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
            November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
            of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
            the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
            the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
            to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
            consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
            attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
            easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
            was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
            symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
            they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
            culminating their celebration.

            After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
            incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
            known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
            the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
            (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
            apples originated from.
            How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
            and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
            Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
            Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
            and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
            to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
            celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
            October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
            days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
            up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
            before.

            According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
            when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
            when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
            on this night and consorting with the devil.

            Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
            adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
            ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
            mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
            'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
            turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
            faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
            adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
            traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
            decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

            Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
            century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
            1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
            was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
            cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
            1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
            30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
            pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

            Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
            visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
            for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
            continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
             
            wolfie
             




            --
            Joan
            Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
             
          • Joan Griffith
            lol, I was only teasing you. After all, everybody does it. Have a look at this--i like the way the pumpkin flies around.
            Message 5 of 18 , Oct 2, 2008
              lol, I was only teasing you. After all, everybody does it.

              Have a look at this--i like the way the pumpkin flies around.

              Joan

              On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:37 PM, wolfie <wolfie@...> wrote:

              I didnt say it, just forwarded it.  Got the link it came from posted on the send.
               
              wolfie 
               
              -------Original Message-------
               
              Date: 10/2/2008 8:33:06 PM
              Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
               
              Love the way you describe all the dead etc. and then say it is a cheerful festival. 
              Joan

              On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@...> wrote:

               
               
              -------
               
              The History Of Halloween

              http://www.ghostsamongus.net/v2/Content/pid=23.html
               
              The History Of Halloween
              10/1/08

              With Halloween just around the corner, I
              thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
              and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

              The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
              is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
              which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
              nothing to do with Christianity.

              Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
              years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
              known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
              November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
              of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
              the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
              the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
              to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
              consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
              attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
              easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
              was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
              symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
              they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
              culminating their celebration.

              After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
              incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
              known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
              the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
              (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
              apples originated from.
              How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
              and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
              Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
              Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
              and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
              to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
              celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
              October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
              days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
              up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
              before.

              According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
              when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
              when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
              on this night and consorting with the devil.

              Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
              adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
              ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
              mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
              'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
              turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
              faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
              adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
              traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
              decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

              Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
              century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
              1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
              was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
              cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
              1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
              30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
              pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

              Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
              visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
              for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
              continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
               
              wolfie
               




              --
              Joan
              Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
               




              --
              Joan
              Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
            • Allison Loukanis
              Well it is.. for my kids it is the favorite holiday. Well They like Christmas too but for them Halloween is about getting candy and not having to give anyone
              Message 6 of 18 , Oct 2, 2008
                Well it is.. for my kids it is the favorite holiday. Well They like Christmas too but for them Halloween is about getting candy and not having to give anyone else anything. sigh.. a bit narcissistic, no? I get into their candy too. However I do give it out liberally. lol.. Allison

                --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Joan Griffith <despinne@...> wrote:
                From: Joan Griffith <despinne@...>
                Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                To: allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 12:25 AM

                Love the way you describe all the dead etc. and then say it is a cheerful festival. 
                Joan

                On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@rochester. rr.com> wrote:
                 
                 
                -------
                 
                The History Of Halloween

                http://www.ghostsam ongus.net/ v2/Content/ pid=23.html
                 
                The History Of Halloween
                10/1/08

                With Halloween just around the corner, I
                thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
                and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

                The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
                is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
                which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
                nothing to do with Christianity.

                Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
                years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
                known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
                November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
                of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
                the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
                the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
                to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
                consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
                attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
                easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
                was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
                symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
                they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
                culminating their celebration.

                After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
                incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
                known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
                the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
                (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
                apples originated from.
                How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
                and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
                Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
                Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
                and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
                to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
                celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
                October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
                days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
                up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
                before.

                According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
                when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
                when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
                on this night and consorting with the devil.

                Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
                adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
                ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
                mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
                'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
                turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
                faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
                adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
                traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
                decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

                Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
                century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
                1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
                was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
                cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
                1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
                30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
                pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

                Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
                visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
                for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
                continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
                 
                wolfie
                 



                --
                Joan
                Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
              • Allison Loukanis
                OH without a doubt I have a big pumpkin head every Halloween and so do my kids..lol.   Can you tell about Hevron? Is that a part of Jerusalem? I had heard
                Message 7 of 18 , Oct 2, 2008
                  OH without a doubt I have a big pumpkin head every Halloween and so do my kids..lol.
                    Can you tell about Hevron? Is that a part of Jerusalem? I had heard that Jerusalem was founded on the site where Abraham was going to sacrifice Isaac before the angel stopped him. Is that the tradition? Allison

                  --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Joan Griffith <despinne@...> wrote:
                  From: Joan Griffith <despinne@...>
                  Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                  To: allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 12:29 AM

                  By comparison, here is an alternative observance by Jewish kids in Israel, a story from Israel National News in 2007.

                   Tonight,( a few) Jewish youth all over the world – except in Israel – will celebrate the pagan holiday of Halloween.
                   Halloween is also called All Hallows' Eve, because, for the gentiles, it is a hallowed evening, the eve of All Saints' Day, a day which honors all Christian saints. The Encyclopedia Britannica explains that in ancient Britain and Ireland, the Festival of Halloween was a also celebration of the end of the fertile period of the Celtic goddess Eiseria. It is said that when Eiseria reaches the end of her fertile cycle the worlds of the dead and the living intertwine. This supposedly happens on October 31. Masks are worn to show respect for the Goddess Eiseria who, like most Celtic gods, does not wish to be seen by human eyes.
                  This date was also New Year's Eve in both Celtic and Anglo-Saxon times, and was the occasion for one of the ancient fire festivals when huge bonfires were set on hilltops to frighten away evil spirits. The souls of the dead were supposed to revisit their homes on this day, and the festival acquired sinister significance, with ghosts, witches, hobgoblins, black cats, fairies, and demons of all kinds said to be roaming about. It was the time to placate the supernatural powers controlling the processes of nature. In addition, Halloween was thought to be the most favorable time for divinations concerning marriage, luck, health, and death. It was the only day on which the help of the devil was invoked for such purposes. These pagan observances also influenced the Christian festival of All Hallows' Eve, celebrated on the same date.
                  Jewish Law states: "A Jew should not follow the customs of the gentiles, nor imitate them in dress, or in their way of trimming their hair, as it says, 'You shall not walk in the customs of the nation which I cast out before you' (Lev. 20:23), and 'Neither shall you walk in their statutes' (Lev. 18:3). These verses all refer to one and the same matter of not imitating them. A Jew, on the contrary, should be distinguished from them and recognizable by the way he dresses, and in his other activities, just as he is distinguished from them in his knowledge and his beliefs, as it is said, 'I have set you apart from the peoples' (Lev. 20:26)." (See, Rambam, Laws Regarding Idol Worship and the Ordinances of the Gentiles, 11:1).
                  When it comes to the question whether Jews can take part in gentile holidays,  the halachic discussion differs between clearly religious holidays like Xmas, which are forbidden, and purely secular holidays like Labor Day, which are permissible. Halloween's religious origins and pagan history place it in the category of gentile holidays that are forbidden to celebrate. Though Halloween in America has been secularized and commercialized to the point where it is now a frivolous time of costumes, candy, and pranks, it is still celebrated in places like Scotland and Ireland as a Celtic festival of the spirits, and in other places as a holiday honoring the Christian saints. Therefore "Trick or Treating" is a no-no for Jewish children.
                  The law prohibiting our participation in gentile holidays and customs comes to protect our special Jewish holiness and cultural distinction. If you allow your kids to participate in the pagan rites of a gentile culture, they will grow up with pumpkin heads instead of Jewish heads.
                  On the other hand, if you try to safeguard our distinction as Jews and not let your children go "Trick or Treating" with all the other kids in the neighborhood , they will grow up hating both you and Judaism for turning them into freaks in the eyes of their friends. Either way, as a parent, you lose.
                  What's the solution? Move to Israel. The only place you will see a pumpkin here is in the supermarket (a small yellow one that looks more like a squash). If you truly love your children and don't want them growing up with pumpkin heads, then the only solution is to bring them to Israel where they will grow up like Jews without hating both you and the Torah.
                  To illustrate, today my nine-year old son went on a class trip to Hevron in honor of  this Shabbat's Torah portion, "Chaya Sarah," which recounts how our forefather, Avraham, purchased the Cave of the Machplah and the surrounding field for a burial site for his family. Since Hevron is the City of our Forefathers, fathers were invited to come along. So while Jewish kids in the Diaspora were trying on their Goblin and Spiderman Halloween costumes, my son was treated to an educational tour of Hevron, the world's oldest Jewish city.
                  Who is more likely to grow up with a Jewish head – the Jewish kids in the Diaspora who go "trick or treating" with the goyim, or the Israeli kids who spend the day learning about their Jewish forefathers and praying in the Cave of the Patriarchs?  
                  If there is any doubt in your mind, it may be because you went "trick or treating" yourself.


                  On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@rochester. rr.com> wrote:
                   
                   
                  -------
                   
                  The History Of Halloween

                  http://www.ghostsam ongus.net/ v2/Content/ pid=23.html
                   
                  The History Of Halloween
                  10/1/08

                  With Halloween just around the corner, I
                  thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
                  and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

                  The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
                  is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
                  which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
                  nothing to do with Christianity.

                  Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
                  years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
                  known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
                  November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
                  of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
                  the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
                  the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
                  to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
                  consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
                  attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
                  easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
                  was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
                  symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
                  they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
                  culminating their celebration.

                  After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
                  incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
                  known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
                  the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
                  (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
                  apples originated from.
                  How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
                  and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
                  Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
                  Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
                  and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
                  to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
                  celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
                  October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
                  days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
                  up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
                  before.

                  According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
                  when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
                  when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
                  on this night and consorting with the devil.

                  Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
                  adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
                  ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
                  mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
                  'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
                  turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
                  faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
                  adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
                  traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
                  decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

                  Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
                  century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
                  1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
                  was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
                  cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
                  1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
                  30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
                  pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

                  Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
                  visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
                  for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
                  continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
                   
                  wolfie
                   



                  --
                  Joan
                  Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
                • Herbert Snyder
                    Halloween, in fact, has many origins.   I believe that children in Ireland started the habit of getting treats from people.   In the Middle Ages, they
                  Message 8 of 18 , Oct 2, 2008
                      Halloween, in fact, has many origins.   I believe that children in Ireland started the habit of getting treats from people.   In the Middle Ages, they would sneak out at night and dress up as monsters.  Then they would go to peoples' homes and ask for treats. 
                     
                       In the old beliefs, the New Year began on November 1st.  That was the day that the Earth went to sleep for the Winter.  The night before was their New Year's Eve, and the Departed were invited to come and visit the living.   People often left food outside for them in case they really came......

                    --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Allison Loukanis <allison.m.loukanis@...> wrote:
                    From: Allison Loukanis <allison.m.loukanis@...>
                    Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                    To: allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 3:21 AM

                    Well it is.. for my kids it is the favorite holiday. Well They like Christmas too but for them Halloween is about getting candy and not having to give anyone else anything. sigh.. a bit narcissistic, no? I get into their candy too. However I do give it out liberally. lol.. Allison

                    --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Joan Griffith <despinne@gmail. com> wrote:
                    From: Joan Griffith <despinne@gmail. com>
                    Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                    To: allthingshistory@ yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 12:25 AM

                    Love the way you describe all the dead etc. and then say it is a cheerful festival. 
                    Joan

                    On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@rochester. rr.com> wrote:
                     
                     
                    -------
                     
                    The History Of Halloween

                    http://www.ghostsam ongus.net/ v2/Content/ pid=23.html
                     
                    The History Of Halloween
                    10/1/08

                    With Halloween just around the corner, I
                    thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
                    and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

                    The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
                    is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
                    which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
                    nothing to do with Christianity.

                    Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
                    years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
                    known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
                    November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
                    of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
                    the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
                    the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
                    to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
                    consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
                    attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
                    easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
                    was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
                    symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
                    they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
                    culminating their celebration.

                    After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
                    incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
                    known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
                    the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
                    (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
                    apples originated from.
                    How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
                    and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
                    Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
                    Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
                    and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
                    to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
                    celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
                    October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
                    days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
                    up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
                    before.

                    According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
                    when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
                    when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
                    on this night and consorting with the devil.

                    Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
                    adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
                    ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
                    mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
                    'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
                    turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
                    faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
                    adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
                    traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
                    decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

                    Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
                    century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
                    1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
                    was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
                    cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
                    1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
                    30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
                    pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

                    Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
                    visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
                    for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
                    continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
                     
                    wolfie
                     



                    --
                    Joan
                    Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin

                  • norenxaq
                    ... Hebron is a city in northern Israel ... Jerusalem already existed. what you might be thinking of is the Dome of the Rock, which is over the place that
                    Message 9 of 18 , Oct 2, 2008
                      Allison Loukanis wrote:

                      OH without a doubt I have a big pumpkin head every Halloween and so do my kids..lol.
                        Can you tell about Hevron? Is that a part of Jerusalem?






                      Hebron is a city in northern Israel



                      I had heard that Jerusalem was founded on the site where Abraham was going to sacrifice Isaac before the angel stopped him. Is that the tradition? Allison






                      Jerusalem already existed. what you might be thinking of is the Dome of the Rock, which is over the place that episode took place




                    • wolfie
                      Sorry, rough day..I think I lost my sense of humor with it! LOL! but its back now at least until I get to work this morning.. the video is wild, I love the
                      Message 10 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
                        Sorry, rough day..I think I lost my sense of humor with it!  LOL!  but its back now  at least until I get to work this morning..
                         
                        the video is wild, I love the pumpkin! this video expresses peoples fears about Halloween...I have been pagan and a practicing witch  for nearly 20 years...can give more accurate information about Druids and Halloween if anyone has questions 
                         
                        -------Original Message-------
                         
                        Date: 10/2/2008 9:22:31 PM
                        Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                         
                        lol, I was only teasing you. After all, everybody does it.

                        Have a look at this--i like the way the pumpkin flies around.

                        Joan

                        On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:37 PM, wolfie <wolfie@...> wrote:

                        I didnt say it, just forwarded it.  Got the link it came from posted on the send.
                         
                        wolfie 
                         
                        -------Original Message-------
                         
                        Date: 10/2/2008 8:33:06 PM
                        Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                         
                        Love the way you describe all the dead etc. and then say it is a cheerful festival. 
                        Joan

                        On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@...> wrote:

                         
                         
                        -------
                         
                        The History Of Halloween

                        http://www.ghostsamongus.net/v2/Content/pid=23.html
                         
                        The History Of Halloween
                        10/1/08

                        With Halloween just around the corner, I
                        thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
                        and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

                        The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
                        is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
                        which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
                        nothing to do with Christianity.

                        Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
                        years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
                        known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
                        November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
                        of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
                        the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
                        the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
                        to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
                        consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
                        attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
                        easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
                        was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
                        symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
                        they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
                        culminating their celebration.

                        After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
                        incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
                        known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
                        the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
                        (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
                        apples originated from.
                        How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
                        and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
                        Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
                        Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
                        and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
                        to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
                        celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
                        October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
                        days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
                        up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
                        before.

                        According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
                        when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
                        when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
                        on this night and consorting with the devil.

                        Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
                        adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
                        ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
                        mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
                        'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
                        turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
                        faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
                        adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
                        traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
                        decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

                        Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
                        century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
                        1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
                        was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
                        cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
                        1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
                        30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
                        pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

                        Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
                        visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
                        for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
                        continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
                         
                        wolfie
                         




                        --
                        Joan
                        Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
                         




                        --
                        Joan
                        Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
                         
                      • Joan Griffith
                        Hevron is the town called Hebron in the Bible. I ve heard that about Abraham & Isaac also, but of course to verify is hardly possible. The prophet/priest
                        Message 11 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
                          Hevron is the town called Hebron in the Bible. I've heard that about Abraham & Isaac also, but of course to verify is hardly possible. The  prophet/priest Melchizedek lived in the town of Salem, which surely was on that site and he was contemporary with Abraham, who paid tithes to him after a battle with 5 city-kings.  (He is always shown as living in a tent & being kind of poor, but how poor can you be if you have your own army?)
                           
                          Joan

                          On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 11:26 PM, Allison Loukanis <allison.m.loukanis@...> wrote:

                          OH without a doubt I have a big pumpkin head every Halloween and so do my kids..lol.
                            Can you tell about Hevron? Is that a part of Jerusalem? I had heard that Jerusalem was founded on the site where Abraham was going to sacrifice Isaac before the angel stopped him. Is that the tradition? Allison


                          --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Joan Griffith <despinne@...> wrote:
                          From: Joan Griffith <despinne@...>
                          Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                          To: allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 12:29 AM

                          By comparison, here is an alternative observance by Jewish kids in Israel, a story from Israel National News in 2007.

                           Tonight,( a few) Jewish youth all over the world – except in Israel – will celebrate the pagan holiday of Halloween.
                           Halloween is also called All Hallows' Eve, because, for the gentiles, it is a hallowed evening, the eve of All Saints' Day, a day which honors all Christian saints. The Encyclopedia Britannica explains that in ancient Britain and Ireland, the Festival of Halloween was a also celebration of the end of the fertile period of the Celtic goddess Eiseria. It is said that when Eiseria reaches the end of her fertile cycle the worlds of the dead and the living intertwine. This supposedly happens on October 31. Masks are worn to show respect for the Goddess Eiseria who, like most Celtic gods, does not wish to be seen by human eyes.
                          This date was also New Year's Eve in both Celtic and Anglo-Saxon times, and was the occasion for one of the ancient fire festivals when huge bonfires were set on hilltops to frighten away evil spirits. The souls of the dead were supposed to revisit their homes on this day, and the festival acquired sinister significance, with ghosts, witches, hobgoblins, black cats, fairies, and demons of all kinds said to be roaming about. It was the time to placate the supernatural powers controlling the processes of nature. In addition, Halloween was thought to be the most favorable time for divinations concerning marriage, luck, health, and death. It was the only day on which the help of the devil was invoked for such purposes. These pagan observances also influenced the Christian festival of All Hallows' Eve, celebrated on the same date.
                          Jewish Law states: "A Jew should not follow the customs of the gentiles, nor imitate them in dress, or in their way of trimming their hair, as it says, 'You shall not walk in the customs of the nation which I cast out before you' (Lev. 20:23), and 'Neither shall you walk in their statutes' (Lev. 18:3). These verses all refer to one and the same matter of not imitating them. A Jew, on the contrary, should be distinguished from them and recognizable by the way he dresses, and in his other activities, just as he is distinguished from them in his knowledge and his beliefs, as it is said, 'I have set you apart from the peoples' (Lev. 20:26)." (See, Rambam, Laws Regarding Idol Worship and the Ordinances of the Gentiles, 11:1).
                          When it comes to the question whether Jews can take part in gentile holidays,  the halachic discussion differs between clearly religious holidays like Xmas, which are forbidden, and purely secular holidays like Labor Day, which are permissible. Halloween's religious origins and pagan history place it in the category of gentile holidays that are forbidden to celebrate. Though Halloween in America has been secularized and commercialized to the point where it is now a frivolous time of costumes, candy, and pranks, it is still celebrated in places like Scotland and Ireland as a Celtic festival of the spirits, and in other places as a holiday honoring the Christian saints. Therefore "Trick or Treating" is a no-no for Jewish children.
                          The law prohibiting our participation in gentile holidays and customs comes to protect our special Jewish holiness and cultural distinction. If you allow your kids to participate in the pagan rites of a gentile culture, they will grow up with pumpkin heads instead of Jewish heads.
                          On the other hand, if you try to safeguard our distinction as Jews and not let your children go "Trick or Treating" with all the other kids in the neighborhood , they will grow up hating both you and Judaism for turning them into freaks in the eyes of their friends. Either way, as a parent, you lose.
                          What's the solution? Move to Israel. The only place you will see a pumpkin here is in the supermarket (a small yellow one that looks more like a squash). If you truly love your children and don't want them growing up with pumpkin heads, then the only solution is to bring them to Israel where they will grow up like Jews without hating both you and the Torah.
                          To illustrate, today my nine-year old son went on a class trip to Hevron in honor of  this Shabbat's Torah portion, "Chaya Sarah," which recounts how our forefather, Avraham, purchased the Cave of the Machplah and the surrounding field for a burial site for his family. Since Hevron is the City of our Forefathers, fathers were invited to come along. So while Jewish kids in the Diaspora were trying on their Goblin and Spiderman Halloween costumes, my son was treated to an educational tour of Hevron, the world's oldest Jewish city.
                          Who is more likely to grow up with a Jewish head – the Jewish kids in the Diaspora who go "trick or treating" with the goyim, or the Israeli kids who spend the day learning about their Jewish forefathers and praying in the Cave of the Patriarchs?  
                          If there is any doubt in your mind, it may be because you went "trick or treating" yourself.


                          On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@rochester. rr.com> wrote:
                           
                           
                          -------
                           
                          The History Of Halloween

                          http://www.ghostsam ongus.net/ v2/Content/ pid=23.html

                           
                          The History Of Halloween
                          10/1/08

                          With Halloween just around the corner, I
                          thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
                          and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

                          The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
                          is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
                          which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
                          nothing to do with Christianity.

                          Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
                          years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
                          known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
                          November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
                          of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
                          the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
                          the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
                          to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
                          consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
                          attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
                          easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
                          was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
                          symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
                          they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
                          culminating their celebration.

                          After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
                          incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
                          known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
                          the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
                          (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
                          apples originated from.
                          How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
                          and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
                          Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
                          Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
                          and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
                          to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
                          celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
                          October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
                          days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
                          up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
                          before.

                          According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
                          when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
                          when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
                          on this night and consorting with the devil.

                          Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
                          adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
                          ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
                          mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
                          'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
                          turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
                          faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
                          adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
                          traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
                          decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

                          Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
                          century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
                          1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
                          was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
                          cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
                          1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
                          30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
                          pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

                          Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
                          visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
                          for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
                          continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
                           
                          wolfie
                           



                          --
                          Joan
                          Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin




                          --
                          Joan
                          Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
                        • Allison Loukanis
                          I have read about Hevron but the v spelling confused me. Thanks. So Jerusalem already existed by the time Abraham got there? Allison ... From: norenxaq
                          Message 12 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
                            I have read about Hevron but the v spelling confused me. Thanks. So Jerusalem already existed by the time Abraham got there? Allison

                            --- On Fri, 10/3/08, norenxaq <norenxaq@...> wrote:
                            From: norenxaq <norenxaq@...>
                            Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                            To: allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 4:17 AM

                            Allison Loukanis wrote:
                            OH without a doubt I have a big pumpkin head every Halloween and so do my kids..lol.
                              Can you tell about Hevron? Is that a part of Jerusalem?





                            Hebron is a city in northern Israel



                            I had heard that Jerusalem was founded on the site where Abraham was going to sacrifice Isaac before the angel stopped him. Is that the tradition? Allison






                            Jerusalem already existed. what you might be thinking of is the Dome of the Rock, which is over the place that episode took place



                          • Joan Griffith
                            Actually, I am collecting info on myths (which means history that can t be proved with artifacts, etc.) to figure out what they really mean. Among the info I
                            Message 13 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
                              Actually, I am collecting info on myths (which means history that can't be proved with artifacts, etc.) to figure out what they really mean. Among the info I found a story that originally, the customs of Halloween were associated with MayDay. Maybe the wild pagan sexcapades ("going Maying" fertility rites) caused Halloween to be moved to Nov. 1. (The old beliefs also had the new year at the Spring equinox).
                               
                              For some interesting information on calendars, see http://www.calendersign.com/en
                              One article shows the "circle of the year" (article: St. Mary's Feast Days) and how the pagan days are aligned with the equinoxes and solstices. In fact, had we not deleted 10 days from the calendar, the dreaded April 15 would fall on May 1!  These holidays are not only religious days, but were used to define when rent payments, etc. were due. The old calendar simply aligned people with the "earth" calendar, so you would know when spring planting, etc. would need to take place, time to harvest, and time to hide out for the snowy winter with all your stores in place.
                               
                              Joan

                              On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 11:26 PM, Herbert Snyder <h.snyder52@...> wrote:

                                Halloween, in fact, has many origins.   I believe that children in Ireland started the habit of getting treats from people.   In the Middle Ages, they would sneak out at night and dress up as monsters.  Then they would go to peoples' homes and ask for treats. 
                               
                                 In the old beliefs, the New Year began on November 1st.  That was the day that the Earth went to sleep for the Winter.  The night before was their New Year's Eve, and the Departed were invited to come and visit the living.   People often left food outside for them in case they really came......

                              --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Allison Loukanis <allison.m.loukanis@...> wrote:
                              From: Allison Loukanis <allison.m.loukanis@...>

                              Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                              To: allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 3:21 AM


                              Well it is.. for my kids it is the favorite holiday. Well They like Christmas too but for them Halloween is about getting candy and not having to give anyone else anything. sigh.. a bit narcissistic, no? I get into their candy too. However I do give it out liberally. lol.. Allison

                              --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Joan Griffith <despinne@gmail. com> wrote:
                              From: Joan Griffith <despinne@gmail. com>
                              Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                              To: allthingshistory@ yahoogroups. com
                              Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 12:25 AM

                              Love the way you describe all the dead etc. and then say it is a cheerful festival. 
                              Joan

                              On Thu, Oct 2, 2008 at 8:20 PM, wolfie <wolfie@rochester. rr.com> wrote:
                               
                               
                              -------
                               
                              The History Of Halloween

                              http://www.ghostsam ongus.net/ v2/Content/ pid=23.html
                               
                              The History Of Halloween
                              10/1/08

                              With Halloween just around the corner, I
                              thought it would be interesting to research on the history of Halloween
                              and its origins, as well as popular celebrations.

                              The name HALLOWEEN is the shortened form of All-hallow-even, because it
                              is celebrated on the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saints' Day,
                              which is a religious festivity. However, the origins of Halloween have
                              nothing to do with Christianity.

                              Halloween first was celebrated by the Celts, who lived around 2,000
                              years ago in northern France, Ireland and the United Kingdom. It was not
                              known by this name, however. The Celts celebrated their new year on
                              November the 1st. According to their beliefs, this date marked the end
                              of summer and the beginning of the long, hard winter. On the eve before
                              the new year, they thought that the boundaries between the living and
                              the dead intertwined and this enabled the dead to make themselves known
                              to the l iving. On that night, they would dress up in costumes
                              consisting of animal heads and skins and built bonfires where they
                              attempted to predict their futures, as fortune telling on this night was
                              easier because of the presence of the dead amongst them. The festival
                              was called Sahmain. They would light a huge sacred bonfire which
                              symbolized protection from the coming winter. After extinguishing it,
                              they would take some coals to relight their hearth fires, thus
                              culminating their celebration.

                              After the Romans had conquered Celtic territory in 43AD, they
                              incorporated two more festivals into the celebration. The first one,
                              known as Feralia, was celebrated a day in late October to commemorate
                              the passing of the dead. The second one celebrated the goddess Pomona
                              (goddess of fruit and trees) and this is probably where bobbing for
                              apples originated from.
                              How did Halloween get its name then? With the coming of Christianity,
                              and in the attempt to eradicate Pagan beliefs and celebrations, Pope
                              Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints' Day, to honor all
                              Christian saints and martyrs. The name Hallows, means Souls, or Sacred,
                              and Een, short for Eve, and we have the name, "Halloween". Furthermore,
                              to confirm and reinforce Christianity, November 2nd was turned into a
                              celebration of the Day of the Dead. Indeed, the Mass carried out on
                              October 31st was called Hallowmas, and the celebrations of the three
                              days had people dressing up as angels, devils and saints, and lighting
                              up bonfires as well, just as the Celts had done thousands of years
                              before.

                              According to many European cultural traditions, Halloween is a night
                              when the dead are more likely to interact with the living and a night
                              when magic is more powerful. This gave way to tales of witches meeting
                              on this night and consorting with the devil.

                              Today, Halloween is celebrated in many parts of the world. In Ireland,
                              adults and children alike dress up in co stumes of ghosts, witches,
                              ghouls, demons and vampires among others. In Scotland, Halloween is
                              mixed with their belief in faeries, and children often carry a around a
                              'Neepy Candle' a devil face carved into a hollowed out Neep, or yellow
                              turnip, which is lit from the inside, in order to frighten away the evil
                              faeries. In the UK, pumpkin carving is widely practiced and children and
                              adults enjoy carving out scary faces on pumpkins. In Germany,
                              traditional Halloween decorations are becoming popular as part of fall
                              decorations, and witches and jack-o-lanterns are frequently seen.

                              Halloween celebrations in the United States did not start until the 19th
                              century, perhaps due to a strict puritan observance that lasted till the
                              1800's. The most popular time for Halloween in the States, therefore,
                              was between 1905 and 1915, when some companies began making Halloween
                              cut outs for decorations. Trick or treating did not become popular till
                              1950, and Halloween costumes only started appearing in stores in the
                              30's! However, nowadays, the most popular Halloween costumes are witch,
                              pirate, vampire, cat and clown, in that order!

                              Whether you go on a haunted ghost tour, which are extremely popular,
                              visit a cemetery or just dress up in a spooky costume to open the door
                              for trick-or-treaters, Halloween is a cheerful festivity that will
                              continue to excite and enthrall us for many more years to come.
                               
                              wolfie
                               



                              --
                              Joan
                              Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin




                              --
                              Joan
                              Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
                            • Joan Griffith
                              The Jews make that linguistic shift, b and v and probably vice versa. It s like the v and w in some other languages, where v is pronounced w and w is spoken
                              Message 14 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
                                The Jews make that linguistic shift, b and v and probably vice versa. It's like the v and w in some other languages, where v is pronounced w and w is spoken like v.  There are some others.
                                Joan

                                On Fri, Oct 3, 2008 at 10:43 AM, Allison Loukanis <allison.m.loukanis@...> wrote:

                                I have read about Hevron but the v spelling confused me. Thanks. So Jerusalem already existed by the time Abraham got there? Allison

                                --- On Fri, 10/3/08, norenxaq <norenxaq@...> wrote:
                                From: norenxaq <norenxaq@...>

                                Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                                To: allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 4:17 AM


                                Allison Loukanis wrote:
                                OH without a doubt I have a big pumpkin head every Halloween and so do my kids..lol.
                                  Can you tell about Hevron? Is that a part of Jerusalem?





                                Hebron is a city in northern Israel



                                I had heard that Jerusalem was founded on the site where Abraham was going to sacrifice Isaac before the angel stopped him. Is that the tradition? Allison






                                Jerusalem already existed. what you might be thinking of is the Dome of the Rock, which is over the place that episode took place






                                --
                                Joan
                                Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
                              • norenxaq
                                ... Jerusalem was where he met Melchizedek, so yes
                                Message 15 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
                                  Allison Loukanis wrote:

                                  I have read about Hevron but the v spelling confused me. Thanks. So Jerusalem already existed by the time Abraham got there? Allison






                                  Jerusalem was where he met Melchizedek, so yes
                                • Kim Noyes
                                  The Bible doesn t say he is poor at any point. I don t know who you are referring to that presented him as poor. He lived in a tent because he was a nomad, not
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
                                    The Bible doesn't say he is poor at any point.
                                    I don't know who you are referring to that presented him as poor.
                                    He lived in a tent because he was a nomad, not because he was poor.
                                    I doubt his tent was ratty and small, but rather large and comfortable.

                                    On Fri, Oct 3, 2008 at 7:12 AM, Joan Griffith <despinne@...> wrote:

                                    Hevron is the town called Hebron in the Bible. I've heard that about Abraham & Isaac also, but of course to verify is hardly possible. The  prophet/priest Melchizedek lived in the town of Salem, which surely was on that site and he was contemporary with Abraham, who paid tithes to him after a battle with 5 city-kings.  (He is always shown as living in a tent & being kind of poor, but how poor can you be if you have your own army?)
                                     
                                    Joan







                                    --
                                    Check out http://groups.yahoo.com/group/californiadisasters/
                                    Check out my blog at http://eclecticarcania.blogspot.com/
                                    Check out my Myspace Profile at http://www.myspace.com/kimusinteruptus
                                    Check out my Ebay store at http://stores.ebay.com/K-K-Earthwerks
                                  • Allison Loukanis
                                    Maybe all those wives impoverished him..lol. I have to go back and read my Bible. The only thing I know named Melchizidek is the mouse in one of Louisa May
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
                                      Maybe all those wives impoverished him..lol. I have to go back and read my Bible. The only thing I know named Melchizidek is the mouse in one of Louisa May Alcott's novels. smile.. Allison

                                      --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@...> wrote:
                                      From: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@...>
                                      Subject: Re: [allthingshistory] Fw: ] The History Of Halloween
                                      To: allthingshistory@yahoogroups.com
                                      Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 6:03 PM

                                      The Bible doesn't say he is poor at any point.
                                      I don't know who you are referring to that presented him as poor.
                                      He lived in a tent because he was a nomad, not because he was poor.
                                      I doubt his tent was ratty and small, but rather large and comfortable.

                                      On Fri, Oct 3, 2008 at 7:12 AM, Joan Griffith <despinne@gmail. com> wrote:
                                      Hevron is the town called Hebron in the Bible. I've heard that about Abraham & Isaac also, but of course to verify is hardly possible. The  prophet/priest Melchizedek lived in the town of Salem, which surely was on that site and he was contemporary with Abraham, who paid tithes to him after a battle with 5 city-kings.  (He is always shown as living in a tent & being kind of poor, but how poor can you be if you have your own army?)
                                       
                                      Joan







                                      --
                                      Check out http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/california disasters/
                                      Check out my blog at http://eclecticarca nia.blogspot. com/
                                      Check out my Myspace Profile at http://www.myspace. com/kimusinterup tus
                                      Check out my Ebay store at http://stores. ebay.com/ K-K-Earthwerks
                                    • Joan Griffith
                                      No, the Bible does not say Abraham is poor, but TV shows & movies present him like that. Did you ever see the TV movie about Joseph, where Jacob (played by
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Oct 3, 2008
                                        No, the Bible does not say Abraham is poor, but TV shows & movies present him like that. Did you ever see the TV movie about Joseph, where Jacob (played by Richard Harris, I think) goes to Egypt, WALKING, and it looks like there are maybe 10-20 people plus sheep, altho the Bible plainly says 75 family members accompanied Jacob. Also, they had so many sheep (Remember, Abraham's shepherds and Lot's shepherds fought over the watering holes; Ab. decided they needed to separate the herds and that is how Lot ended up in Sodom) that the Pharaoh told them to stay in "Goshen" because the Egyptians, altho they worshipped bulls, hated sheep. lol. The origins of the sheepman-cattle wars.
                                        Abraham lived in a tent because he considered it to be temporary until God produced the promised blessings. His wife had her own sumptuous tent.
                                         
                                        Joan

                                         
                                        On Fri, Oct 3, 2008 at 2:03 PM, Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@...> wrote:

                                        The Bible doesn't say he is poor at any point.
                                        I don't know who you are referring to that presented him as poor.
                                        He lived in a tent because he was a nomad, not because he was poor.
                                        I doubt his tent was ratty and small, but rather large and comfortable.

                                        On Fri, Oct 3, 2008 at 7:12 AM, Joan Griffith <despinne@...> wrote:

                                        Hevron is the town called Hebron in the Bible. I've heard that about Abraham & Isaac also, but of course to verify is hardly possible. The  prophet/priest Melchizedek lived in the town of Salem, which surely was on that site and he was contemporary with Abraham, who paid tithes to him after a battle with 5 city-kings.  (He is always shown as living in a tent & being kind of poor, but how poor can you be if you have your own army?)
                                         
                                        Joan







                                        --
                                        Check out http://groups.yahoo.com/group/californiadisasters/
                                        Check out my blog at http://eclecticarcania.blogspot.com/
                                        Check out my Myspace Profile at http://www.myspace.com/kimusinteruptus
                                        Check out my Ebay store at http://stores.ebay.com/K-K-Earthwerks




                                        --
                                        Joan
                                        Freedom means the opportunity to be what we never thought we would be.~Daniel Boorstin
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