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VARNEY/MORAN, Ronan, Alta.

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  • atelepen@edmc.net
    From the Rootsweb newsletter: if it rings a bell, contact the person who submitted the item, e-mail address at the end. Angie Telepenko atelepen@edmc.net *
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 6, 2000
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      From the Rootsweb newsletter: if it rings a bell, contact the person who
      submitted the item, e-mail address at the end.

      Angie Telepenko
      atelepen@...
      * * *

      In 1913, Louise VARNEY nee MORAN, a widow, and her young daughter, Violet,
      left the east end of London ("Stratford East") for the district around
      Ronan, Alberta, Canada. All Louise knew about farming was what she had
      seen in southern England. Her intention was to make a new start for
      herself and her daughter in a new land of opportunity. She took a piano
      with her, so she had every intention of staying.

      Ronan had a post office that became a lifeline to England for Louise and
      Violet. Surviving letters show that they approached Ronan from the south,
      staying one night at a boarding house at Wildwood, then called Junkins.
      While in Ronan they stayed at Ronan Post Office, apparently in a log cabin
      in a place where most of the trees had been removed. When they left,
      Louise gave her piano to Mr. and Mrs. JENKINS, who ran the post office.

      Louise VARNEY had thought she was coming to a home and farm, but her
      expectations were dashed when it turned out that the principal living was
      gained by felling trees, the land being poor and the farming very
      difficult. She had a miserable time and wanted to return home, but Violet
      wanted to remain, having made contact with prospective husbands,
      identified in letters as Morris CRULES and Mr. CASPER. These plans did not
      work out and Louise and Violet began the journey home by the Canadian
      Pacific Railway via Montreal. Their difficulties continued and, after a
      difficult journey to Montreal, in May 1914 both were drowned in the Gulf
      of St. Lawrence while on the Canadian Pacific liner, the "Empress of
      Ireland."

      I would like to hear from anyone who has information or has heard talk
      about an English woman above age 60 and her young daughter, in distressed
      circumstances about 1913-1914, in the area of Ronan, Alberta, Canada.
      Mike Reeve, Harrogate reeve.mjr@...

      Written by Mike Reeve <reeve.mjr@...>. Previously published by
      Julia M. Case and Myra Vanderpool Gormley, CG, Missing Links, Vol. 5, No.
      22, 31 May 2000. RootsWeb: <http://www.rootsweb.com/>
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