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[albanach] Re: Weapons combination

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  • James Gilly / Alasdair mac Iain
    ... Diana - You might want to check Campaign Headquarters, on Little Creek Rd a block or so east of Wards Corner, in Norfolk. They usually have most of the
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 17, 2000
      At 10:52 17-1-2000 -0500, Diana wrote:
      >> You may like to get a copy of "The Scottish and Welsh Wars 1250-1400" put
      >> out in the Osprey Men-At-Arms series. We sell it in the museum gift shop
      >> for $12.95. It details the arms and armour, as well as military tactics of
      >> the period and is very easy to comprehend. (Well illustrated). Let me
      >> know if you would like me to get you a copy.
      >~Please. If you could send me the total, including tax/shipping, I'll
      >send you a check. Thanks!

      Diana -

      You might want to check Campaign Headquarters, on Little Creek Rd a block
      or so east of Wards Corner, in Norfolk. They usually have most of the
      Osprey books in stock.


      Alasdair mac Iain



      Tighearn Alasdair mac Iain of Elderslie
      Dun an Leomhain Bhig
      Canton of Dragon's Aerie [southeastern CT]
      Barony Beyond the Mountain [northern & southeastern CT]
      East Kingdom
      ------- ------- -------
      Argent, a chevron cotised azure surmounted by a sword and
      in chief two mullets sable
    • Diana
      Bkwyrm@aol.com wrote: I know that a lot of cavalry units carry/carried their sabers in a sheath tucked between their leg and the saddle. Assuming the
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 17, 2000
        Bkwyrm@... wrote: I know that a lot of cavalry units carry/carried
        their sabers in a sheath tucked between their leg and the saddle.
        Assuming the broadsword isn't baskethilted, it should work?

        Thanks!
        Diana
      • JBRMM266@aol.com
        Diana, The claymore, mostly a footsoldier s weapon, was usually carried naked over the shoulder. The slings and such that moderns have devised are mostly just
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 17, 2000
          Diana,

          The claymore, mostly a footsoldier's weapon, was usually carried naked over
          the shoulder. The slings and such that moderns have devised are mostly just
          that, modern, as concessions to safety.

          One who kept such a weapon for sentimental reasons may well have had a
          special sheath made for it, though, and would very likely have hung it from
          his saddle, I would think toward the back, since it would seem he really
          didn't mean to fight with it. Or if he did, it would be when he dismounted,
          and he could unsling the sheath and draw the sword.

          By teh way, I concur with Aladair's suggestion to visit Campaign
          Headquarters. It's a war-gaming place, and they have lots of reference
          material, including, as he said, much of the Osprey series.

          Your servant,
          Jeb/Donal
        • cathal@mindspring.com
          ... claymore strapped on his back and a broadsword strapped upon his horse? Thank you very much in advance. Diana Cosby cosby@erols.com The claymore (two
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 17, 2000
            albanach@egroups.com wrote:
            > If a man were mounted, is it feasible that he would carry both a
            claymore strapped on his back and a broadsword strapped upon his horse?
            Thank you very much in advance.
            Diana Cosby
            cosby@...

            The claymore (two handed variety) is not a horseman's
            weapon. I cannot recall any battle, either in England or the
            Continent, in which there was a mention of mounted men using that
            balde style. Carried on the back as you suggest it would, imo,
            be much too cumbersome to quickly draw and would also inhibit the
            ability of the rider to execute some of the deeper moves with the
            normal length broadsword. It could also severely impact the
            balance of the rider in a tight spot.

            I have read mention of auxiliary weapons such as axes,
            maces and swords being strapped to the saddle frame or even of
            scabbard holders being made as part of the tree. But keep in
            mind that the utility of such holders would be secondary to the
            consideration of any problems them might cause the rider in the
            control of his mount.
            Edward Wagner's _Tracht Wehr und Waffen
            1350-1450_ (Prague, 1968)(published as _Medieval Costumes, Weapons
            and Armour_ in 1979 in the US of A)gives some good clear line drawings
            of horse furniture and scabbard types. Mr. Wagner's work was originally published as a guide for museum staffs to do dioramas
            for that one hundred year period and it has some minutiae on camp
            life and accoutrements not found elsewhere. Most of the illustrations
            are from central and eastern European sources and are generally
            documented by their mss. of origin. A reading knowledge of
            German is helpful but not absolutely necessary. (N.B. Aside
            from the Scots, the more likely theatre of operations one would
            find a two handed sword would be that of central and eastern
            Europe among the mercenary companies of the period.)

            I hope the foregoing will be of some assistance.

            Cathal.
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