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Re: Thank you, Shel: [albanach] Thank you - Preparing for battle - how to ready a sword?

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  • Jody Allen
    Thank you so much this is wonderful information just what I needed. jody ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 20, 2010
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      Thank you so much this is wonderful information just what I needed.

      jody

      On Fri, Sep 17, 2010 at 5:17 AM, Shel Browder <ebrowder@...>wrote:

      > Hi Jody,
      >
      > My apologies for the late reply. I just got back from England and I
      > didn'thave the opportunity to check my email there.
      >
      > First, the boundaries between iron working trades can blur and certainly
      > ironworkers will stray into the territories of one another. That said,
      > blacksmiths are pretty much generalists who work on farm tools, tools
      > for other tradesmen, household equipment and hardware, and spend a lot
      > of time as well doing repairs on all sorts of things. An armourer is
      > trained to make and repair arms and armour. In the 13th century they
      > could be making weapons as well as armour, or not. Sword making is
      > often a trade unto itself. DThey would certainly need to repair weapons.
      >
      > Repairs to armour and weapons would encompass a wide variety of work.
      > Dents in armour would need to be taken out and re-polished. Buckles and
      > straps break and need to be repaired and riveted back. Chain mail links
      > may need to be repaired and "sewn" back. Bent and broken swords,
      > lances, etc. need to be straightened or rew-elded (broken swords can be
      > re-welded), hardened and tempered and polished. Sword hilts and lance
      > tips can loosen and require tightening. Battles are hard on equipment.
      >
      > Since there is a fairly extensive set of tools required and a set of
      > highly developed shills as well, I doubt if most knights could do more
      > than the simplest field expedient repairs.
      >
      > Skills in all trades have been learned through apprenticeships for a
      > very long time, certainly earlier than the 13th century, though I don't
      > know anything about those early apprenticeships. Some guilds in Britain
      > go back to the 12th century and perhaps earlier. They would set the
      > terms of apprenticeship.
      >
      > I hope this helps. It would be fun to research trades from that time.
      >
      > I was at an ironmaking conference in the south of England and also had
      > time to help with some archaeology on a recently discovered iron making
      > site--probably 12th century.
      >
      > Beannachd leat,
      > Shel
      >
      > On 8/29/10 11:07 AM, Jody Allen wrote:
      > >
      > > Shel
      > > May I ask a question. As a blacksmith, in the period of the early
      > > 1300's in
      > > Scotland what would be the difference between an armourer and a
      > > blacksmith?
      > > What types of equipment would an armourer be repairing for a group of
      > > knights and men at arms?
      > >
      > > Where would an armourer learn the skills needed to make armour as well as
      > > chainmail? And could this be a skill a knight might have learned as he
      > > served a Lord during his training to be a knight?
      > >
      > > Jody
      > > On Thu, Aug 12, 2010 at 4:57 PM, Shel Browder <ebrowder@...
      > > <mailto:ebrowder%40widomaker.com <ebrowder%2540widomaker.com>>>wrote:
      > >
      > > > Hi Diana,
      > > >
      > > > It has been an interesting summer. The heat and humidity have not made
      > > > it a particularly pleasant one for working in a blacksmith shop but
      > > > having two good interns as well as having archaeology going on around
      > > > the blacksmith shop have made it fun. I'll end it with a trip to
      > > > England (wish that it were Scotland) to attend an iron making
      > conference
      > > > and hopefully up to the Royal Armouries at Leeds to look at old, sharp
      > > > stuff. I hope that you have had a good summer. How is your new book
      > > > coming?
      > > >
      > > > Shel
      > > >
      > > > On 8/12/10 5:02 PM, Diana Cosby wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Shel Browder wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > >The word claymore comes from the Gaelic "claidheamh mor" and
      > normally
      > > > > >refers to a double edged, single handed sword. The Gaelic for
      > > thegreat
      > > > > >two handed sword is "claidheamh da laimh", which means two-handed
      > > > > >sword. I suspect that the 13th century Gaelic is a bit different for
      > > > > >both, though I don't know. If I were preparing for battle, I would
      > > > > >check my weapons, probably several times (a bit of testosterone
      > > fueled
      > > > > >nervousness), but they would be kept sharp and in good order all the
      > > > > >time. It is likely that some nobility left such things to
      > underlings,
      > > > > >but some people prefer to be more directly involved with their
      > > personal
      > > > > >weapons, perhaps because it focuses the mind on the upcoming
      > > fray. The
      > > > > >underlings should have their own weapons and other tasks to
      > > attend to.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > ~Thank you very much, Shel, great information. Hope you're enjoying
      > > > > your summer!
      > > > >
      > > > > Diana
      > > > > www.dianacosby.com <http://www.dianacosby.com/>
      > > > > His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
      > > > > His Woman/Duncan MacGruder - 4 star Romantic Times review - 2009
      > > > > Booksellers Best Finalist
      > > > > His Conquest - Pre-Order now! / His Destiny - Nov 2011
      > > > >
      > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
      > > > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD. Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
      > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD. Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >


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