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Term for crafting a copper kettle?

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  • Diana Cosby
    When a smithy crafts a copper kettle, what is that called? Here s what I m trying to find the term for: . . . strands of her hair, like the color of a copper
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 3, 2008
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      When a smithy crafts a copper kettle, what is that called? Here's
      what I'm trying to find the term for:

      . . . strands of her hair, like the color of a copper kettle freshly
      shaped. ???
      freshly hewn. ???
      freshly crafted. ???

      Thank you in advance.
      Diana
      www.dianacosby.com
      Zebra/His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
      Zebra/His Woman/December 08/Duncan MacGruder



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Diana Cosby
      ... ~Great, love this. ... ~My story setting is 1297, so not sure if they have copper wire yet? Thank you very much for taking the time to reply! Diana
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 3, 2008
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        Shelton Browder wrote:

        >Hi Diana,
        >
        >"Hewn" would apply only to wood. "Crafted" is generic and would apply to
        >most any handmade process, whatever the process or material. One process
        >for making non-ferrous vessels is called "raising". Your line could read
        >"like the color of a copper kettle newly raised."
        >
        >
        ~Great, love this.

        >If you wished to use a more hairlike copper product, then you could say
        >"like the color of copper wire, newly drawn". Copper wire is sized by
        >drawing it through increasingly smaller holes until the desired diameter
        >is reached. It causes the surface to be rubbed bright.
        >
        >
        ~My story setting is 1297, so not sure if they have copper wire yet?
        Thank you very much for taking the time to reply!
        Diana

        www.dianacosby.com
        Zebra/His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
        Zebra/His Woman/December 08/Duncan MacGruder
      • Shelton Browder
        Hi Diana, Hewn would apply only to wood. Crafted is generic and would apply to most any handmade process, whatever the process or material. One process
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 3, 2008
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          Hi Diana,

          "Hewn" would apply only to wood. "Crafted" is generic and would apply to
          most any handmade process, whatever the process or material. One process
          for making non-ferrous vessels is called "raising". Your line could read
          "like the color of a copper kettle newly raised."

          If you wished to use a more hairlike copper product, then you could say
          "like the color of copper wire, newly drawn". Copper wire is sized by
          drawing it through increasingly smaller holes until the desired diameter
          is reached. It causes the surface to be rubbed bright.

          Shel

          Quoting Diana Cosby <wulfe6@...>:

          > When a smithy crafts a copper kettle, what is that called? Here's
          > what I'm trying to find the term for:
          >
          > . . . strands of her hair, like the color of a copper kettle freshly
          > shaped. ???
          > freshly hewn. ???
          > freshly crafted. ???
          >
          > Thank you in advance.
          > Diana
          > www.dianacosby.com
          > Zebra/His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
          > Zebra/His Woman/December 08/Duncan MacGruder
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >


          Shel
        • Shelton Browder
          Hi again, glad to help. Words are fun and sticking them together to form visual images is quite a craft itself. I like your imagry. It fits in with the
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 4, 2008
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            Hi again,

            glad to help. Words are fun and sticking them together to form visual
            images is quite a craft itself. I like your imagry. It fits in with the
            imagry that shows up in old stories and poems.

            Copper wire was around long before that, though I don't know when it first
            appears. Maybe I'll dig around to see just for fun.

            Shel

            Quoting Diana Cosby <wulfe6@...>:

            > Shelton Browder wrote:
            >
            > >Hi Diana,
            > >
            > >"Hewn" would apply only to wood. "Crafted" is generic and would apply
            > to
            > >most any handmade process, whatever the process or material. One
            > process
            > >for making non-ferrous vessels is called "raising". Your line could
            > read
            > >"like the color of a copper kettle newly raised."
            > >
            > >
            > ~Great, love this.
            >
            > >If you wished to use a more hairlike copper product, then you could
            > say
            > >"like the color of copper wire, newly drawn". Copper wire is sized by
            > >drawing it through increasingly smaller holes until the desired
            > diameter
            > >is reached. It causes the surface to be rubbed bright.
            > >
            > >
            > ~My story setting is 1297, so not sure if they have copper wire yet?
            > Thank you very much for taking the time to reply!
            > Diana
            >
            > www.dianacosby.com
            > Zebra/His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
            > Zebra/His Woman/December 08/Duncan MacGruder
            >
            >
            >


            Shel
          • Diana Cosby
            ... ~Thank you very much. ... ~That would make sense. I watched a show on how copper is mined, and it s an enormous process with today s technology. For
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 4, 2008
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              Shelton Browder wrote:

              >Hi again,
              >
              >glad to help. Words are fun and sticking them together to form visual images is quite a craft itself. I like your imagry. It fits in with the imagry that shows up in old stories and poems.
              >
              >
              ~Thank you very much.

              >Copper wire was around long before that, though I don't know when it first appears. Maybe I'll dig around to see just for fun.
              >
              >
              ~That would make sense. I watched a show on how copper is mined, and
              it's an enormous process with today's technology. For medieval times
              and before, it must have been super time and labor intensive, which
              would have made the price outrageous.
              Diana

              www.dianacosby.com
              Zebra/His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
              Zebra/His Woman/December 08/Duncan MacGruder
            • Shelton Browder
              Well, human labour had no great worth, so it did not add to the expense of things the way that it does today. Add to that that most people did not have
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 5, 2008
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                Well, human labour had no great worth, so it did not add to the expense of
                things the way that it does today. Add to that that most people did not
                have expenses beyond food, clothing and housing (no car, no phone, no
                insurance, no health insurance, few taxes) and a little discretionary
                income could be used for nice things. Copper and brass was more expensive
                than iron (it still is) though iron requires more effort to extract from
                ores than copper. But iron isn't scarce and copper is. Gold is expensive
                beacuse of its relative scarcity and desirability. Iron is cheapest and a
                great deal more useful.

                Shel

                Quoting Diana Cosby <wulfe6@...>:

                > Shelton Browder wrote:
                >
                > >Hi again,
                > >
                > >glad to help. Words are fun and sticking them together to form visual
                > images is quite a craft itself. I like your imagry. It fits in with
                > the imagry that shows up in old stories and poems.
                > >
                > >
                > ~Thank you very much.
                >
                > >Copper wire was around long before that, though I don't know when it
                > first appears. Maybe I'll dig around to see just for fun.
                > >
                > >
                > ~That would make sense. I watched a show on how copper is mined, and
                > it's an enormous process with today's technology. For medieval times
                > and before, it must have been super time and labor intensive, which
                > would have made the price outrageous.
                > Diana
                >
                > www.dianacosby.com
                > Zebra/His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
                > Zebra/His Woman/December 08/Duncan MacGruder
                >
                >
                >


                Shel
              • Diana Cosby
                ... ~Excellent point. ... ~So true. Shel, thank you very much for taking the time to reply. I sincerely appreciate it. Have a great day. Diana
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 5, 2008
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                  Shelton Browder wrote:

                  >Well, human labour had no great worth, so it did not add to the expense of things the way that it does today.
                  >
                  ~Excellent point.

                  >Add to that that most people did not have expenses beyond food, clothing and housing (no car, no phone, no insurance, no health insurance, few taxes) and a little discretionary income could be used for nice things. Copper and brass was more expensive than iron (it still is) though iron requires more effort to extract from ores than copper. But iron isn't scarce and copper is. Gold is expensive beacuse of its relative scarcity and desirability. Iron is cheapest and a great deal more useful.
                  >
                  >
                  ~So true. Shel, thank you very much for taking the time to reply. I
                  sincerely appreciate it. Have a great day.
                  Diana

                  www.dianacosby.com
                  Zebra/His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
                  Zebra/His Woman/December 08/Duncan MacGruder
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