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1297 Scottish history question - Nigel - Selkirk Forest

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  • Diana Cosby
    ... ~Nigel, thank you for the above information. Over the holidays, I did find mention of Wallace using Selkirk Forest in 1297 as a gathering point, Robert
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 31, 2007
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      Bruce Gordon wrote:

      >Not quite then, yet. Edward defeated Baliol in late '96, seized the Stone of Scone, left Scotland in the hands of three commissioners (chief among them John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey). He then returned to England and thereafter was preoccupied with affairs in France - went on campaign there in Gascony 1297-98. Wallace first appears onstage leading a group of thirty raiders in burning Lanark in May '97, then manuevering against Warenne, whom he eventually defeated at Stirling in September. He then took matters into northern England, raiding Northumberland and Cumberland in December.
      >
      ~Nigel, thank you for the above information. Over the holidays, I did
      find mention of Wallace using Selkirk Forest in 1297 as a gathering
      point, "Robert Bruce & The Community of The Realm of Scotland," Geoffrey
      W.S. Barrow, page 85, 1/2 down. What reference are you using? I ask
      as, if I don't have it in my research library, I'd like to acquire it.

      >Edward didn't return to England until March of '98, and invaded Scotland (again) in July, by which time Wallace had been made Regent, proved himself an inept administrator, and had lost much but not all support among the Scots nobles.
      >
      ~I found it interesting reading to find that Bruce, not Wallace, had the
      skills of guerilla warfare.

      >Edwards defeat of Wallace at Falkirk on July 22 is what drove Wallace into the shadows - he probably went to France for a time, but by 1299 he had become a hunted man on the moors, and very little is known of his movements until his capture (near Glasgow) in August of 1305 ; he was pursued relentlessly by the English in this period, as you say, and may very well have spent time in the marshes of Selkirk, among other locales - but that's all after Falkirk, late July of '98, and more specifically the period of his guerilla campaigns 1299-1305.
      >
      >
      ~Thank you very much for taking the time to reply. Happy New Year!
      Diana

      www.dianacosby.com
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