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  • Vitaliano Vincenzi
    I am not sure how much your group can help me, but I am hoping for some help with period Scottish recipes. I am serving as Feast Steward this year for Autumn
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 21, 2007
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      I am not sure how much your group can help me, but I am hoping for some
      help with period Scottish recipes. I am serving as Feast Steward this
      year for Autumn Rose XIII in the Shire of Rokeclif, Kingdom of
      Northshield, and one of the courses for this feast will be Scottish. You
      can see more about this feast at:

      http://periodfood.blogspot.com/2007/01/feast-of-knowne-world.html

      The first course is Scottish, and I am hoping to include haggis, a
      vegetable dish, Scottish bread and a Scottish beverage (non-alcoholic)
      for this course. I will also need some help with garb research for my
      page and his/her presentation. I already have a piper who will perform
      as well.

      So, any information on sources for Scottish recipes, garb, behavior
      would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

      --
      Lord Vitaliano Vincenzi
      aka Shane Lambert
      http://www.periodfood.blogspot.com
    • Diana Cosby
      ... ~Have you checked out, The Scots Kitchen, by F. Marian McNeill? An on-line source for traditional Scottish recipes is:
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 21, 2007
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        Vitaliano Vincenzi wrote:

        >I am not sure how much your group can help me, but I am hoping for some
        >help with period Scottish recipes. I am serving as Feast Steward this
        >year for Autumn Rose XIII in the Shire of Rokeclif, Kingdom of
        >Northshield, and one of the courses for this feast will be Scottish. You
        >can see more about this feast at:
        >
        >http://periodfood.blogspot.com/2007/01/feast-of-knowne-world.html
        >
        >The first course is Scottish, and I am hoping to include haggis, a
        >vegetable dish, Scottish bread and a Scottish beverage (non-alcoholic)
        >for this course. I will also need some help with garb research for my
        >page and his/her presentation. I already have a piper who will perform
        >as well.
        >
        >So, any information on sources for Scottish recipes, garb, behavior
        >would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
        >
        >
        ~Have you checked out, "The Scots Kitchen," by F. Marian McNeill? An
        on-line source for traditional Scottish recipes is:
        http://www.rampantscotland.com/recipes/blrecipe_index.htm

        Hope this helps.

        Diana Cosby
        www.dianacosby.com
        Zebra/November 07/His Captive
        Zebra/November 08/Title TBA
      • Muirghein
        ... Is there any way to tell which of these are traditional recipes are period and which are later, like the 18th-19th centuries? For example, when did
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 21, 2007
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          At 12:40 PM 2/21/2007, Diana Cosby wrote:
          >An on-line source for traditional Scottish recipes is:
          >http://www.rampantscotland.com/recipes/blrecipe_index.htm

          Is there any way to tell which of these are "traditional" recipes are
          period and which are later, like the 18th-19th centuries?

          For example, when did potatoes (Arran Potato Salad) first make it to
          Scotland? I doubt in period:

          http://www.indepthinfo.com/potato/history.shtml
          >Europe would wait until the 1780's before the potato gained
          >prominence anywhere. About 1780 the people of Ireland adopted the
          >rugged food crop.

          YiS,
          Baintighearna Muirghein Dhaire Faoilciarach /|\
          Dreiburgen Web Minister http://www.dreiburgen.org
          (any posts to e-mail lists do not reflect official
          opinions unless specifically stated otherwise)
        • Diana Cosby
          ... ~As far as the link for traditional Scottish recipes, I offered them as I was unsure if you were open to any era. As far as period correct meals, if you
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 22, 2007
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            Muirghein wrote:

            >At 12:40 PM 2/21/2007, Diana Cosby wrote:
            >
            >
            >>An on-line source for traditional Scottish recipes is:
            >>http://www.rampantscotland.com/recipes/blrecipe_index.htm
            >>
            >>
            >
            >Is there any way to tell which of these are "traditional" recipes are
            >period and which are later, like the 18th-19th centuries?
            >
            >
            ~As far as the link for traditional Scottish recipes, I offered them as
            I was unsure if you were open to any era. As far as period correct
            meals, if you check The Scots Kitchen by F. Marian McNeill, some dates
            are given along with the recipe as well as lore. I'll be interested to
            see what others offer. Hope this helps.
            Diana

            www.dianacosby.com
            Zebra/November 07/His Captive
            Zebra/November 08/Title TBA



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Julie Stackable
            ... some ... this ... Scottish. You ... alcoholic) ... my ... perform ... Regrettably, the earliest known Scottish written recipes are very late 17th century.
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 22, 2007
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              --- In albanach@yahoogroups.com, Vitaliano Vincenzi <vitaliano@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I am not sure how much your group can help me, but I am hoping for
              some
              > help with period Scottish recipes. I am serving as Feast Steward
              this
              > year for Autumn Rose XIII in the Shire of Rokeclif, Kingdom of
              > Northshield, and one of the courses for this feast will be
              Scottish. You
              > can see more about this feast at:
              >
              > http://periodfood.blogspot.com/2007/01/feast-of-knowne-world.html
              >
              > The first course is Scottish, and I am hoping to include haggis, a
              > vegetable dish, Scottish bread and a Scottish beverage (non-
              alcoholic)
              > for this course. I will also need some help with garb research for
              my
              > page and his/her presentation. I already have a piper who will
              perform
              > as well.

              Regrettably, the earliest known Scottish written recipes are very
              late 17th century. It's just one of those 'holes' in the Scottish
              written records. I have never found a good answer for why there were
              no Scottish cookery books printed during the period. Having said
              that - Haggis was certainly period.

              I would suggest any good 'peasant' oat bread recipe for the Scottish
              bread. The Scottish preference for oats, which the 'civilized' world
              considered fit only for livestock, was commented upon in the 16th
              century. I've not found any particular Scottish 'beverages' that are
              non-alcoholic. (There is a sort of gruel made of water and oats that
              travellers were said to drink, but I doubt it's what you want for a
              feast). Although, in point of fact, this was true at the time for the
              rest of the British Isles. Pretty much everyone consumed ale or beer,
              (with 'small' beer and ale being an everyday drink), water or wine.

              The Scots Kitchen is probably the best overall reference for Scottish
              recipes, but again, you must realize these are all post period
              recipes for period things. There are currently no written Scottish
              recipes prior to about 1680 or so. But, Ms. McNeil does give a lot of
              references within the text with period quotes referring to certain
              foods.

              The kitchen and buttery accounts of the Earl of Angus from five
              months in 1608 are the most complete picture, I think. There are
              references to royal and ecclesiastical food purchases and feast
              throughout the 16th century, but the Earl's record is one of food
              purchased for his household in Glasgow and the Canongate. Oat bread
              is definitely listed, it is the cheapest sort of bread purchased, so
              I would rate it a 'common' sort of bread and representative of Scots
              fare in the way you are looking for.

              Again, ale was the beverage of choice, being considered fine for
              breakfast. Also listed in the accounts are purchases of an array of
              wines (French,Canary, Spanish, Malaga and Sack were all purchased).
              Normally the family's ale would have been made by themselves, but
              they were living in lodgings, so all the ale was purchased. But the
              family's prodigious wine consumption was a mark of their rank and
              what they could afford.

              There were not a lot of fresh vegetable dishes served in Scotland in
              period. The only vegetables purchased by the Earl's family were
              cabbages and parsley in June, carrots in September and cabbages in
              October. And most of these vegetables were mean for the broth. Herbs
              were the only 'green' things that were regularly purchased.

              I would suggest instead a Cock a Leekie soup made with vegetable
              broth. It is known in period and will include a vegetable broth as
              well as leeks.

              > So, any information on sources for Scottish recipes, garb, behavior
              > would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

              Most of the food evidence is late period, so there's no question on
              the dates for that, but as for the rest of your needs, it would be
              excellent if you could narrow down your time period.

              Toujours a vos ordres,
              Margaret Hepburn
            • Julie Stackable
              As an addendum, I had a brief look through the online Dictionary of the Scots language looking for beverages. The only other thing I found was one mention of
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 22, 2007
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                As an addendum, I had a brief look through the online Dictionary of the
                Scots language looking for beverages. The only other thing I found was
                one mention of cider from 1548 (and it would most likely be alcoholic).
                There is a mention of 'cannell-water' in the 1630's which is cinnamon
                water, but it was a medicinal drink.
                Margaret Hepburn
              • Scott Galloway
                Is this first course to be simple or grand? For a simple bread, there s oatcakes, ground oats, salt, water, and perhaps an egg mixed together and baked on a
                Message 7 of 15 , Feb 22, 2007
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                  Is this first course to be simple or grand? For a simple bread, there's oatcakes, ground oats, salt, water, and perhaps an egg mixed together and baked on a griddle. After cooking the haggis, you could spread it on the oatcakes. Non-alcoholic beverages would be water, either spring or boiled, or milk. I have a few recipes for wild game, if you wish to de-modernize them. Stewed meat and vegetables is the simplest preparation. Many of the historical recipes come from the nobility and are not usually what the poor folks ate, except for haggis and oatcakes.
                  Scott

                  Julie Stackable <malvoisine@...> wrote:
                  As an addendum, I had a brief look through the online Dictionary of the
                  Scots language looking for beverages. The only other thing I found was
                  one mention of cider from 1548 (and it would most likely be alcoholic).
                  There is a mention of 'cannell-water' in the 1630's which is cinnamon
                  water, but it was a medicinal drink.
                  Margaret Hepburn






                  ---------------------------------
                  Don't pick lemons.
                  See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Vitaliano Vincenzi
                  This first course is a light course, so your idea of haggis spread on oatcakes could be good. I would love to make this a grand course, but I just don t know
                  Message 8 of 15 , Feb 23, 2007
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                    This first course is a light course, so your idea of haggis spread on
                    oatcakes could be good. I would love to make this a grand course, but I
                    just don't know how many people will want to eat Haggis once they know
                    what is in it, so making simple break (oatcakes) and offering small
                    amounts of Haggis for those daring soles is most likely the idea.

                    Darn drunken Scots. Didn't they drink anything without alcohol? Oh yeah,
                    very few people in period did. :)

                    Thank you. If you have a recipe for Oatcakes I would love to see it as I
                    have LOTS of oats around here to play with. :)

                    Scott Galloway wrote:
                    > Is this first course to be simple or grand? For a simple bread, there's oatcakes, ground oats, salt, water, and perhaps an egg mixed together and baked on a griddle. After cooking the haggis, you could spread it on the oatcakes. Non-alcoholic beverages would be water, either spring or boiled, or milk. I have a few recipes for wild game, if you wish to de-modernize them. Stewed meat and vegetables is the simplest preparation. Many of the historical recipes come from the nobility and are not usually what the poor folks ate, except for haggis and oatcakes.
                    > Scott
                    >
                    > Julie Stackable <malvoisine@...> wrote:
                    > As an addendum, I had a brief look through the online Dictionary of the
                    > Scots language looking for beverages. The only other thing I found was
                    > one mention of cider from 1548 (and it would most likely be alcoholic).
                    > There is a mention of 'cannell-water' in the 1630's which is cinnamon
                    > water, but it was a medicinal drink.
                    > Margaret Hepburn
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Don't pick lemons.
                    > See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
                    > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
                    > Yahoo! Groups - Join or create groups, clubs, forums & communities. Links
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    --
                    Lord Vitaliano Vincenzi
                    aka Shane Lambert
                    http://www.periodfood.blogspot.com
                  • Vitaliano Vincenzi
                    I have been trying to find a copy of The Scots Kitchen at our local library but they don t seem to have it. I see that Amazon.com has it and I will probably
                    Message 9 of 15 , Feb 23, 2007
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                      I have been trying to find a copy of "The Scots Kitchen" at our local
                      library but they don't seem to have it. I see that Amazon.com has it and
                      I will probably pick it up unless I can find it locally. Thank you.

                      Diana Cosby wrote:

                      > ~Have you checked out, "The Scots Kitchen," by F. Marian McNeill? An
                      > on-line source for traditional Scottish recipes is:
                      > http://www.rampantscotland.com/recipes/blrecipe_index.htm
                      >
                      > Hope this helps.

                      --
                      Lord Vitaliano Vincenzi
                      aka Shane Lambert
                      http://www.periodfood.blogspot.com
                    • Vitaliano Vincenzi
                      Thank you for so much wonderful information. I am planning to make this course representative of the late 15th and early 16th centuries. I would love to have
                      Message 10 of 15 , Feb 23, 2007
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                        Thank you for so much wonderful information. I am planning to make this
                        course representative of the late 15th and early 16th centuries. I would
                        love to have some traditional Scottish Ale brewed and serve it at feast
                        - in fact, I know someone who does it. However, even if I WERE allowed
                        to do it, the event grounds would require us to have a Temporary Liquor
                        license for the weekend, and being Labor Day weekend and since the
                        county limits the number available, we are not able to get one. Looks
                        like water and maybe milk are the choices for beverages.

                        I do plan to include Haggis in this course, but it will be a light
                        course. Someone in another list suggested making Oat cakes and either
                        spreading the haggis on those, or offering it as a "spread" for those
                        that want to try it. Anyone have a good recipe for these Oat Cakes I
                        hear mentioned all the time?

                        Several people have suggested the Scot's Kitchen and I am in the process
                        of acquiring a copy. The soup you mentioned sounds good too and may
                        become a part of this course.

                        Thank you.

                        Julie Stackable wrote:

                        > Regrettably, the earliest known Scottish written recipes are very
                        > late 17th century. It's just one of those 'holes' in the Scottish
                        > written records. I have never found a good answer for why there were
                        > no Scottish cookery books printed during the period. Having said
                        > that - Haggis was certainly period.
                        >
                        > I would suggest any good 'peasant' oat bread recipe for the Scottish
                        > bread. The Scottish preference for oats, which the 'civilized' world
                        > considered fit only for livestock, was commented upon in the 16th
                        > century. I've not found any particular Scottish 'beverages' that are
                        > non-alcoholic. (There is a sort of gruel made of water and oats that
                        > travellers were said to drink, but I doubt it's what you want for a
                        > feast). Although, in point of fact, this was true at the time for the
                        > rest of the British Isles. Pretty much everyone consumed ale or beer,
                        > (with 'small' beer and ale being an everyday drink), water or wine.
                        >
                        > The Scots Kitchen is probably the best overall reference for Scottish
                        > recipes, but again, you must realize these are all post period
                        > recipes for period things. There are currently no written Scottish
                        > recipes prior to about 1680 or so. But, Ms. McNeil does give a lot of
                        > references within the text with period quotes referring to certain
                        > foods.
                        >
                        > The kitchen and buttery accounts of the Earl of Angus from five
                        > months in 1608 are the most complete picture, I think. There are
                        > references to royal and ecclesiastical food purchases and feast
                        > throughout the 16th century, but the Earl's record is one of food
                        > purchased for his household in Glasgow and the Canongate. Oat bread
                        > is definitely listed, it is the cheapest sort of bread purchased, so
                        > I would rate it a 'common' sort of bread and representative of Scots
                        > fare in the way you are looking for.
                        >
                        > Again, ale was the beverage of choice, being considered fine for
                        > breakfast. Also listed in the accounts are purchases of an array of
                        > wines (French,Canary, Spanish, Malaga and Sack were all purchased).
                        > Normally the family's ale would have been made by themselves, but
                        > they were living in lodgings, so all the ale was purchased. But the
                        > family's prodigious wine consumption was a mark of their rank and
                        > what they could afford.
                        >
                        > There were not a lot of fresh vegetable dishes served in Scotland in
                        > period. The only vegetables purchased by the Earl's family were
                        > cabbages and parsley in June, carrots in September and cabbages in
                        > October. And most of these vegetables were mean for the broth. Herbs
                        > were the only 'green' things that were regularly purchased.
                        >
                        > I would suggest instead a Cock a Leekie soup made with vegetable
                        > broth. It is known in period and will include a vegetable broth as
                        > well as leeks.
                        >
                        >> So, any information on sources for Scottish recipes, garb, behavior
                        >> would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
                        >
                        > Most of the food evidence is late period, so there's no question on
                        > the dates for that, but as for the rest of your needs, it would be
                        > excellent if you could narrow down your time period.

                        --
                        Lord Vitaliano Vincenzi
                        aka Shane Lambert
                        http://www.periodfood.blogspot.com
                      • rowen_g
                        ... it at feast ... If it is within the feast budget, and you would like a more interesting option, you might consider serving some of the non-alcohalic
                        Message 11 of 15 , Feb 28, 2007
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                          --- In albanach@yahoogroups.com, Vitaliano Vincenzi <vitaliano@...> wrote:
                          > I would love to have some traditional Scottish Ale brewed and serve
                          it at feast
                          > - in fact, I know someone who does it. However, even if I WERE allowed
                          > to do it, the event grounds would require us to have a Temporary Liquor
                          > license for the weekend, and being Labor Day weekend and since the
                          > county limits the number available, we are not able to get one. Looks
                          > like water and maybe milk are the choices for beverages.
                          > <snip>


                          If it is within the feast budget, and you would like a more
                          interesting option, you might consider serving some of the
                          non-alcohalic beer-type beverages available. (But it's always good to
                          have plenty of water as well as anything else.)

                          regards,

                          Rowen Brithwallt
                        • malkin7@aol.com
                          In a message dated 2/28/2007 3:56:02 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time, rowengr@hotmail.com writes: Looks ... ok, it might be England instead of Scotland, but
                          Message 12 of 15 , Feb 28, 2007
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                            In a message dated 2/28/2007 3:56:02 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time,
                            rowengr@... writes:

                            Looks
                            > like water and maybe milk are the choices for beverages.



                            ok, it might be England instead of Scotland, but wasn't cider a popular
                            drink? Of course theirs would have been hard cider, but you could do regular
                            cider.

                            Heleyne
                            <BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now offers free
                            email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
                            http://www.aol.com


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Sharon L. Krossa
                            ... But not particularly associated with Scotland in period, to best of my knowledge. (They did have haggis, but it wasn t yet considered particularly Scottish
                            Message 13 of 15 , Feb 28, 2007
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                              At 5:29 PM +0000 2/22/07, Julie Stackable wrote:
                              >Regrettably, the earliest known Scottish written recipes are very
                              >late 17th century. It's just one of those 'holes' in the Scottish
                              >written records. I have never found a good answer for why there were
                              >no Scottish cookery books printed during the period. Having said
                              >that - Haggis was certainly period.

                              But not particularly associated with Scotland in period, to best of
                              my knowledge. (They did have haggis, but it wasn't yet considered
                              particularly Scottish -- and I don't think there is any reason to
                              think it must have been Scottish in origin. Search DSL-DOST headwords
                              for haggis for the two known quotes mentioning it --
                              http://www.dsl.ac.uk/)

                              However, there is a period recipe (transcription of original text)
                              from "Two fifteenth-century cookery-books : Harleian MS. 279 (ab
                              1430), & Harl. MS. 4016 (ab. 1450), with extracts from Ashmole MS.
                              1439, Laud MS. 553, & Douce MS. 55 " available online specifically at

                              <http://www.hti.umich.edu:80/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=cme;cc=cme;type=simple;rgn=div2;q1=hag%2A;view=text;subview=detail;sort=occur;idno=CookBk;node=CookBk%3A6.3#hl1>

                              Note this is from an English cookbook, not a Scottish one.

                              BTW, similarly bagpipes were not particularly associated with
                              Scotland in period -- and in fact appear to have arrived in Scotland
                              from England in the late medieval era (first in Lowland Scotland,
                              then the Highlands). If I recall correctly, the earliest references
                              to bagpipes in Scotland are payments to English bagpipers.

                              >I would suggest any good 'peasant' oat bread recipe for the Scottish
                              >bread. The Scottish preference for oats, which the 'civilized' world
                              >considered fit only for livestock, was commented upon in the 16th
                              >century.

                              I wouldn't call this so much a "preference" as an economic thing.
                              Scots who could afford it ate white (wheat flour) bread. The poor ate
                              (oat) "cakes". (Which weren't like what we would call a cake -- they
                              were probably quite similar to modern oatcakes, and so basically a
                              water and oats cracker-like thing.)

                              For some period quotes about oat cakes, search DSL-DOST headwords for cake.

                              As for serving the haggis spread on oatcakes, I don't particularly
                              recommend it unless you've got some period evidence that this is how
                              these foods were eaten in period somewhere in Europe (Scotland or
                              elsewhere). How food is mixed together, combined, served, etc.
                              changed just as much by culture and time period as anything else, and
                              while to us moderns putting haggis on oatcakes sounds quite obvious,
                              it may not have done so to period Scots (or any other Europeans).

                              If you're worried people won't like the haggis (and if they like hot
                              dogs or sausages of any kind, or pate, they should like haggis --
                              people think they don't like it only because everyone tells them they
                              shouldn't like it, but all haggis is is a kind of sausage served
                              without the skin) then just serve very small amounts.

                              >The kitchen and buttery accounts of the Earl of Angus from five
                              >months in 1608 are the most complete picture, I think. There are
                              >references to royal and ecclesiastical food purchases and feast
                              >throughout the 16th century, but the Earl's record is one of food
                              >purchased for his household in Glasgow and the Canongate. Oat bread
                              >is definitely listed, it is the cheapest sort of bread purchased, so
                              >I would rate it a 'common' sort of bread and representative of Scots
                              >fare in the way you are looking for.

                              Well, common in the sense of eaten by the poorer people (and recall
                              the SCA assumes everyone is a noble unless otherwise specified ;-)

                              >Again, ale was the beverage of choice, being considered fine for
                              >breakfast. Also listed in the accounts are purchases of an array of
                              >wines (French,Canary, Spanish, Malaga and Sack were all purchased).
                              >Normally the family's ale would have been made by themselves, but
                              >they were living in lodgings, so all the ale was purchased. But the
                              >family's prodigious wine consumption was a mark of their rank and
                              >what they could afford.

                              You mean this family's -- the Earl of Angus's? Because it was very
                              common for people to buy ale, even if they also made their own.

                              >There were not a lot of fresh vegetable dishes served in Scotland in
                              >period. The only vegetables purchased by the Earl's family were
                              >cabbages and parsley in June, carrots in September and cabbages in
                              >October. And most of these vegetables were mean for the broth. Herbs
                              >were the only 'green' things that were regularly purchased.

                              Kale is often mentioned in Aberdeen. And keep in mind that purchases
                              do not tell the whole story with regard to food. Even in towns people
                              had gardens in their back yards, where vegetables (like kale, etc.)
                              were typically grown.

                              Anyway, for resources on Scottish things in general, including
                              clothing, see my website (Medieval Scotland) at
                              http://MedievalScotland.org/ (BTW, note that I believe everything
                              discussed so far for food is based on Lowland or English evidence,
                              not Gaelic or Highland.)

                              Sharon, ska Affrick nyn Ken3e
                              --
                              Sharon Krossa, PhD - skrossa-ml@...
                              Resources for Scottish history, names, clothing, language & more:
                              Medieval Scotland - http://www.MedievalScotland.org/
                              Shopping Online? Help support! - http://MedievalScotland.org/patron/
                              The most complete index of reliable web articles about pre-1600 names:
                              The Medieval Names Archive - http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/
                            • Julie Stackable
                              ... of ... Yes, I was specifically referring to the Earl s family. They were living in cramped quarters. The Earl had been in a lot of legal trouble and things
                              Message 14 of 15 , Mar 1, 2007
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                                --- In albanach@yahoogroups.com, "Sharon L. Krossa" <skrossa-ml@...>
                                wrote:
                                > >Again, ale was the beverage of choice, being considered fine for
                                > >breakfast. Also listed in the accounts are purchases of an array
                                of
                                > >wines (French,Canary, Spanish, Malaga and Sack were all purchased).
                                > >Normally the family's ale would have been made by themselves, but
                                > >they were living in lodgings, so all the ale was purchased. But the
                                > >family's prodigious wine consumption was a mark of their rank and
                                > >what they could afford.
                                >
                                > You mean this family's -- the Earl of Angus's? Because it was very
                                > common for people to buy ale, even if they also made their own.

                                Yes, I was specifically referring to the Earl's family. They were
                                living in cramped quarters. The Earl had been in a lot of legal
                                trouble and things were not going so well. For quite a bit of the
                                time, it doesn't look like a lot of his normal household was with
                                him, including his wife. (there is an excellent discussion of his
                                situation in the 'Laird's Kitchen', along with the accounts)

                                > >There were not a lot of fresh vegetable dishes served in Scotland
                                in
                                > >period. The only vegetables purchased by the Earl's family were
                                > >cabbages and parsley in June, carrots in September and cabbages in
                                > >October. And most of these vegetables were mean for the broth.
                                Herbs
                                > >were the only 'green' things that were regularly purchased.
                                >
                                > Kale is often mentioned in Aberdeen. And keep in mind that
                                purchases
                                > do not tell the whole story with regard to food. Even in towns
                                people
                                > had gardens in their back yards, where vegetables (like kale, etc.)
                                > were typically grown.

                                Again, these were transitory rented lodgings, so it is doubtful they
                                had their own kaleyard. However, it is very possible that the
                                lodgings had their own kaleyard, but mention was not made in the
                                accounts. If it wasn't clear in the paragraph, again, I was
                                specifically referring to the Earl's family, since there was a
                                written record, not discussing Scots as a whole.

                                > Anyway, for resources on Scottish things in general, including
                                > clothing, see my website (Medieval Scotland) at
                                > http://MedievalScotland.org/ (BTW, note that I believe everything
                                > discussed so far for food is based on Lowland or English evidence,
                                > not Gaelic or Highland.)

                                Is there any anecdotal evidence for Scottish Gaelic or Highland food
                                (obviously they ate something, I just mean written records)? I'm
                                thinking we're a go for cattle (grin), and I know I've seen
                                references to the use of seaweed in coastal areas, but it's not
                                really my area of research....

                                By the way, there used to be a really great website on the history of
                                Scottish cheese, which has sadly disappeared!

                                Toujours a vos ordres,
                                Margaret Hepburn
                              • Diana Cosby
                                ... ~I m not sure if you ve ever used ebay, but a new version of The Scot s Kitchen is up: Item #: 220097127889
                                Message 15 of 15 , Apr 3, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Vitaliano Vincenzi wrote:

                                  >I have been trying to find a copy of "The Scots Kitchen" at our local
                                  >library but they don't seem to have it. I see that Amazon.com has it and
                                  >I will probably pick it up unless I can find it locally. Thank you.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  ~I'm not sure if you've ever used ebay, but a new version of The Scot's
                                  Kitchen is up:
                                  Item #: 220097127889
                                  http://cgi.ebay.com/THE-SCOTS-KITCHEN-F-MARIAN-MCNEILL-PB_W0QQitemZ220097127889QQcategoryZ276QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD2VQQcmdZViewItem

                                  Hope that helps.
                                  Diana

                                  www.dianacosby.com
                                  Zebra/November 07/His Captive
                                  Zebra/November 08/Title TBA
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