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[albanach] Gaelic Translation

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  • MacUalraig@aol.com
    In Braveheart, William Wallace is giving his speech before the battle of Sterling (Bridge), at the end of the speech he says something that sounds like an
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 3, 1999
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      In "Braveheart," William Wallace is giving his speech before the battle of
      Sterling (Bridge), at the end of the speech he says something that sounds
      like "an da gobrach" or something similar. Does anyone know what exactly he
      says, and what does it mean?

      Thank you in advance,
      Culloch
    • James Gilly / Alasdair mac Iain
      ... Probably Alba gu brath - Scotland forever. This is the Scottish equivalent of the Irish Erin go bragh, which you see every March. As I understand
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 3, 1999
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        At 16:03 3-9-1999 EDT, you wrote:
        >In "Braveheart," William Wallace is giving his speech before the battle of
        >Sterling (Bridge), at the end of the speech he says something that sounds
        >like "an da gobrach" or something similar. Does anyone know what exactly he
        >says, and what does it mean?

        Probably "Alba gu brath" - "Scotland forever." This is the Scottish
        equivalent of the Irish "Erin go bragh," which you see every March.

        As I understand it, this literally translates as "Scotland until
        judgement," meaning until Judgement Day - pretty much the same as forever,
        to a true believer.


        Alasdair mac Iain



        Laird Alasdair mac Iain of Elderslie
        Dun an Leomhain Bhig
        Canton of Dragon's Aerie [southeastern CT]
        Barony Beyond the Mountain [northern & southeastern CT]
        East Kingdom
        ------- ------- -------
        Argent, a chevron cotised azure surmounted by a sword and
        in chief two mullets sable
      • Diana Cosby
        I m trying to help another writer. She needs to have Shadow Warrior translated to Gaelic. Can you be of any assistance? Thank you so much for your time.
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 5, 2003
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          I'm trying to help another writer. She needs to have "Shadow Warrior"
          translated to Gaelic. Can you be of any assistance? Thank you so much
          for your time.
          Diana Cosby

          --
          wulfe6@...
          VRW Newsletter Editor
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          "Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark. Professionals built the Titanic." - Author Unknown
        • Sharon L. Krossa
          ... For what purpose? That is, how is she going to use the phrase Shadow Warrior (in Gaelic) in her book? If she s thinking of using it for some kind of
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 5, 2003
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            At 10:26 PM -0400 7/5/03, Diana Cosby wrote:
            > I'm trying to help another writer. She needs to have "Shadow Warrior"
            >translated to Gaelic. Can you be of any assistance? Thank you so much
            >for your time.

            For what purpose? That is, how is she going to use the phrase "Shadow
            Warrior" (in Gaelic) in her book?

            If she's thinking of using it for some kind of name, my educated
            guess is that it would only be appropriate in a fantasy novel. (I
            haven't researched the particular phrase as a name, but based on what
            I have found in historical Gaelic naming, a translation of "Shadow
            Warrior" just isn't likely as a historical Gaelic name, byname, or
            nickname.)

            Sharon
            --
            Sharon Krossa, skrossa-ml@...
            Resources for Scottish history, names, clothing, language & more:
            Medieval Scotland - http://www.MedievalScotland.org/
            The most complete index of reliable web articles about pre-1600 names:
            The Medieval Names Archive - http://www.panix.com/~mittle/names/
          • Diana Cosby
            Sharon L. Krossa wrote: If she s thinking of using it for some kind of name, my educated guess is that it would only be appropriate in a fantasy novel. (I
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 6, 2003
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              Sharon L. Krossa wrote: If she's thinking of using it for some kind of
              name, my educated guess is that it would only be appropriate in a
              fantasy novel. (I haven't researched the particular phrase as a name,
              but based on what I have found in historical Gaelic naming, a
              translation of "Shadow Warrior" just isn't likely as a historical Gaelic
              name, byname, or nickname.)

              ~Yes, she's aware this isn't a historically correct name. She's seeking
              the translation only of Shadow Warrior to Gaelic. Thank you for your
              response.
              Diana Cosby

              --
              wulfe6@...
              VRW Newsletter Editor
              http://members.cox.net/wulfe6/
              "Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark. Professionals built the Titanic." - Author Unknown
            • Sharon L. Krossa
              ... Again, for what purpose? Are you indicating that she does intend to use it as a name? Note that translating a phrase in isolation often results in an
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 6, 2003
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                At 9:34 AM -0400 7/6/03, Diana Cosby wrote:
                >Sharon L. Krossa wrote: If she's thinking of using it for some kind of
                >name, my educated guess is that it would only be appropriate in a
                >fantasy novel. (I haven't researched the particular phrase as a name,
                >but based on what I have found in historical Gaelic naming, a
                >translation of "Shadow Warrior" just isn't likely as a historical Gaelic
                >name, byname, or nickname.)
                >
                >~Yes, she's aware this isn't a historically correct name. She's seeking
                >the translation only of Shadow Warrior to Gaelic. Thank you for your
                >response.

                Again, for what purpose? Are you indicating that she does intend to
                use it as a name?

                Note that translating a phrase in isolation often results in an
                inaccurate translation, whether for names or anything else.
                Especially when asking for a translation of a phrase rather than a
                full sentence, full information for how it is intended to be used
                should be given to help the translators translate correctly. Also,
                any ambiguities of intended meaning should be clarified. For example,
                is the warrior fighting shadows or is he a shadow himself, etc.? What
                sense of "shadow" is intended -- a shadow on the sidewalk, a kind of
                ghost, etc.? If for a historical novel, what time period and what is
                desired regarding using historical or modern Gaelic? Etc. Any
                potential translator needs to know this information in order to
                translate accurately.

                That being said, if the intention is to use a translation of "Shadow
                Warrior" for a name in a historical novel, I confess I'm not inclined
                to spend my time trying to figure out the correct Gaelic for it
                (except perhaps if the book in question is clearly marked as a
                fantasy novel rather than historical). I will, however, point out
                that "Shadow Warrior" isn't all that easy a thing to translate into
                Gaelic -- it strikes me as a very English fantasy book kind of phrase
                and I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out it could only be
                translated into rather clumsy and/or artificial Gaelic. (As said, I
                haven't spent the time trying to figure it out, so it could be there
                is some sense of "Shadow Warrior" that would work very well in
                Gaelic.)

                I don't mean to be curmudgeonly, but it takes time and effort to
                translate things for people, and I'd rather spend my limited time
                helping people interested in historical accuracy. Her best bet is to
                try to find a fluent speaker for whom translating the phrase would be
                quick and easy and require essentially no effort (unless it really is
                something that doesn't work in Gaelic) -- but when asking such a
                person she should still give full information on exactly how she
                intends to use the phrase and exactly what she intends it to mean.
                (If you make the translator have to ask, it is no longer quick, easy,
                and effortless.)

                Sharon
                --
                Sharon L. Krossa, skrossa-ml@...
              • Diana Cosby
                Sharon L. Krossa wrote: Again, for what purpose? Are you indicating that she does intend to use it as a name? ~Yes. ... ~I understand. ... ~I will definitely
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 6, 2003
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                  Sharon L. Krossa wrote: Again, for what purpose? Are you indicating
                  that she does intend to use it as a name?

                  ~Yes.

                  > That being said, if the intention is to use a translation of "Shadow
                  > Warrior" for a name in a historical novel, I confess I'm not inclined
                  > to spend my time trying to figure out the correct Gaelic for it
                  > (except perhaps if the book in question is clearly marked as a fantasy
                  > novel rather than historical). I will, however, point out
                  > that "Shadow Warrior" isn't all that easy a thing to translate into
                  > Gaelic -- it strikes me as a very English fantasy book kind of phrase
                  > and I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out it could only be
                  > translated into rather clumsy and/or artificial Gaelic. (As said, I
                  > haven't spent the time trying to figure it out, so it could be there
                  > is some sense of "Shadow Warrior" that would work very well in
                  > Gaelic.)

                  ~I understand.

                  > I don't mean to be curmudgeonly, but it takes time and effort to
                  > translate things for people, and I'd rather spend my limited time
                  > helping people interested in historical accuracy. Her best bet is to
                  > try to find a fluent speaker for whom translating the phrase would be
                  > quick and easy and require essentially no effort (unless it really is
                  > something that doesn't work in Gaelic) -- but when asking such a
                  > person she should still give full information on exactly how she
                  > intends to use the phrase and exactly what she intends it to mean. (If
                  > you make the translator have to ask, it is no longer quick, easy, and
                  > effortless.)

                  ~I will definitely pass this information to her. Excellent points. I
                  wasn't sure if someone on this list was fluent in Gaelic, that was my
                  hope. Thank you so much for your time.
                  Diana

                  --
                  wulfe6@...
                  VRW Newsletter Editor
                  http://members.cox.net/wulfe6/
                  "Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark. Professionals built the Titanic." - Author Unknown
                • K K
                  good for you diana i think anyone able to hold there temper after that kind of rattling on need there props.....so good for you ...i wish i could help you but
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jul 7, 2003
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                    good for you diana
                    i think anyone able to hold there temper after that kind of rattling on need
                    there
                    props.....so good for you ...i wish i could help you but i'm just learning
                    the lang. now but if i come across something i'll send it to you

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                  • K K
                    this might be able to help you i m not sure which you need but you can put them together in some different ways the gramer points are with them shadow faileas
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jul 7, 2003
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                      this might be able to help you
                      i'm not sure which you need but you can put them together in some different
                      ways the gramer points are with them

                      shadow

                      faileas
                      nm. g.v. -eis; pl.+an, reflection, shadow
                      sg�il
                      nf. g.+e; pl.+ean, shade, shadow, veil
                      sg�th
                      nm. g.+a; v. sg�ith; pl.+an, shadow, shade; dread, apprehension, sake,
                      account

                      warrior

                      �rmunn
                      nm. g.v. -uinn; pl. -uinn, warrior
                      gaisgeach
                      nm. g.v. -ich; pl. -ich, champion, hero, warrior
                      laoch
                      nm. g.v. laoich; pl. laoich, hero, champion, warrior
                      saoi
                      nm. pl. -dhean, good, worthy person; magnanimous man; learned man, warrior,
                      scholar

                      shadow warrior

                      most likly from what i've been told you'll have to ask i for get if the
                      descriptive goes first or last
                      the first is if its one person as a name or title the second is a
                      descriptive as in a member of a group or a type of warrior

                      sg�il laoch or sg�il saoi

                      laoch sg�il or saoi sg�il

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