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Pronouncng my name (was Re: Fwd: The Hobbit in Irish?)

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  • Muirghein
    ... Rather than try this myself, I ll just quote one of our experts, ... Per http://www.medievalscotland.org/problem/names/morgan.shtml, the spelling I use is
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 3, 2006
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      At 01:08 PM 2/19/2006, Cecily wrote:
      >Muirghein wrote:
      > > Dunno how on-topic it is here, but I thought some might be
      > > interested :-).
      > >
      > > Muirghein /|\
      >
      >Muirghein - your name looks beautiful. Would you mind telling me how to
      >pronounce it? What time period is it from?

      Rather than try this myself, I'll just quote one of our experts,
      Sharon, ska Euphrick:

      >Muirgen/Muirghen = /MUUR-yehn/, with the UU trying to represent a
      >'continental European' quality U, which is very hard to write
      >unambiguously
      >in English. It's like the 'oo' in English 'moo' and 'moon', but not the
      >'oo' in many pronunciations of English 'moor' (i.e., it is *not* like
      >'more'). To represent it another way, it's like the 'ou' in English 'you'
      >or English 'mousse' (*not* 'mouse'), but *not* like English 'our'. The
      >/yehn/ is like the name of the Japanese currency. (The vowel sound in the
      >2nd syllable is not very vital -- it could end up sounding as much like
      >'yin' and 'yen'.) Notice that the 'g'/'gh' is pronounced like a hard 'y',
      >and that there is *no* hard 'y' sound after the 'M'. (Another way to
      >think
      >of it would be like the surname of naturalist John Muir, only
      >*without* the
      >hard 'y' after the 'M' -- not /MYUUR/ but /MUUR/)
      >
      >Gaelic, with few exceptions, always places a strong stress/emphasis
      >on the
      >first syllable or any name or word.

      Per http://www.medievalscotland.org/problem/names/morgan.shtml, the
      spelling I use is Early Modern, c.1400 and after, though IIRC when we
      did the consultation on it, that spelling ran a little earlier too
      (my persona was born in 1288).

      Sharon can, of course, correct anything I've goofed :-). She was one
      of the people who helped me go from Morgan O'Daire to Muirghein
      Dhaire when I realized my name just didn't work with my persona and,
      being a herald, wanted to fix it :-).

      YiS,
      Baintighearna Muirghein Dhaire Faoilciarach /|\
      Dreiburgen Web Minister http://www.dreiburgen.org
      (any posts to e-mail lists do not reflect official
      opinions unless specifically stated otherwise)
    • Sandi
      Thanks for this information, muur-yen ! It really interests me, too, that when I say your name correctly it almost sounds like I am saying Morgan . Is
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 3, 2006
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        Thanks for this information, "muur-yen"! It really interests me, too,
        that when I say your name correctly it almost sounds like I am saying
        "Morgan". Is Morgan an Anglicization of Muirghein?

        Cecily

        Muirghein wrote:

        >At 01:08 PM 2/19/2006, Cecily wrote:
        >
        >
        >>Muirghein wrote:
        >>
        >>
        >>>Dunno how on-topic it is here, but I thought some might be
        >>>interested :-).
        >>>
        >>>Muirghein /|\
        >>>
        >>>
        >>Muirghein - your name looks beautiful. Would you mind telling me how to
        >>pronounce it? What time period is it from?
        >>
        >>
        >
        >Rather than try this myself, I'll just quote one of our experts,
        >Sharon, ska Euphrick:
        >
        >
        >
        >>Muirgen/Muirghen = /MUUR-yehn/, with the UU trying to represent a
        >>'continental European' quality U, which is very hard to write
        >>unambiguously
        >>in English. It's like the 'oo' in English 'moo' and 'moon', but not the
        >>'oo' in many pronunciations of English 'moor' (i.e., it is *not* like
        >>'more'). To represent it another way, it's like the 'ou' in English 'you'
        >>or English 'mousse' (*not* 'mouse'), but *not* like English 'our'. The
        >>/yehn/ is like the name of the Japanese currency. (The vowel sound in the
        >>2nd syllable is not very vital -- it could end up sounding as much like
        >>'yin' and 'yen'.) Notice that the 'g'/'gh' is pronounced like a hard 'y',
        >>and that there is *no* hard 'y' sound after the 'M'. (Another way to
        >>think
        >>of it would be like the surname of naturalist John Muir, only
        >>*without* the
        >>hard 'y' after the 'M' -- not /MYUUR/ but /MUUR/)
        >>
        >>Gaelic, with few exceptions, always places a strong stress/emphasis
        >>on the
        >>first syllable or any name or word.
        >>
        >>
        >
        >Per http://www.medievalscotland.org/problem/names/morgan.shtml, the
        >spelling I use is Early Modern, c.1400 and after, though IIRC when we
        >did the consultation on it, that spelling ran a little earlier too
        >(my persona was born in 1288).
        >
        >Sharon can, of course, correct anything I've goofed :-). She was one
        >of the people who helped me go from Morgan O'Daire to Muirghein
        >Dhaire when I realized my name just didn't work with my persona and,
        >being a herald, wanted to fix it :-).
        >
        >YiS,
        >Baintighearna Muirghein Dhaire Faoilciarach /|\
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sharon L. Krossa
        ... It shouldn t all that much alike -- is pronounced roughly MORE-ghen (with a hard g , as in English , and MORE roughly like the English
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 3, 2006
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          At 7:28 PM -0600 4/3/06, Sandi wrote:
          >Thanks for this information, "muur-yen"! It really interests me, too,
          >that when I say your name correctly it almost sounds like I am saying
          >"Morgan".

          It shouldn't all that much alike -- <Morgan> is pronounced roughly
          "MORE-ghen" (with a hard "g", as in English <gun>, and "MORE" roughly
          like the English word <more>), while <Muirghein> is pronounced
          roughly "MOOR-yen" ("MOO" like the sound a cow makes, *not* like the
          vowel in English <more>), so not only are the primary vowel sounds
          different, but one has a hard "g" sound where the other has a "y"
          sound.

          [These days I try harder to make pronunciation guides work as much as
          possible as if they were English, but sometimes this is difficult
          when English doesn't cooperate...]

          >Is Morgan an Anglicization of Muirghein?

          No, they are unrelated. See
          <http://www.medievalscotland.org/problem/names/morgan.shtml>.

          Sharon, away from home and so not posting much
          --
          Sharon Krossa, skrossa-ml@...
          Resources for Scottish history, names, clothing, language & more:
          Medieval Scotland - http://MedievalScotland.org/
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