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Name pronounciations & descriptive bynames?

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  • Nancy Carr Zupanic
    Greetings all! I m looking for a basic pronounciation guide as I work on possibly choosing a new name for myself. I ve been trying to find pronounciations for
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 13, 2006
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      Greetings all!

      I'm looking for a basic pronounciation guide as I work on possibly choosing
      a new name for myself. I've been trying to find pronounciations for
      interesting names through St. Gabriel's past work archives, but I'm not
      having any luck.

      I'm also trying to find what words might be used as descriptive bynames. I
      only know of Dubh (dark) and Mhor (big). I don't want to be called big, and
      I don't think I'm very dark (now if I had inherited my Spanish mother's
      coloring......) Again, the pronounciation issue could be a problem.

      Muirgheal inghean Labhrainn
      (called Morel)



      --
      Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
      Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
      Version: 7.0.298 / Virus Database: 265.6.3 - Release Date: 21/12/04
    • ebrowder@widomaker.com
      Well, there is Donn (Dhonn is feminine pronunced ghunn ) for brown hair, etc, Bàn (Bhàn is fem and pronounced vaan ) for fair coloring, and Ruadh (fem. and
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 13, 2006
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        Well, there is Donn (Dhonn is feminine pronunced "ghunn") for brown hair, etc,
        Bàn (Bhàn is fem and pronounced "vaan") for fair coloring, and Ruadh (fem. and
        masc.--pronounced ruag) for red heads. Bheag (from beag for small) prononced
        "vick".

        This is all modern Gaelic, which is what I'm learning. I expect that Sharon can
        correct me and provide you with a better naming choices and a pronunciation
        guide for your time as well. Pronounciation can vary considerably regionally
        and certainly
        over time, these very comon words should be approximately the same. Gaelic is
        very gutteral and the "g" sound is very hard and throaty. In beginning of
        these words, "mh" and "bh" produce "v" sounds. In Dhubh and Dhonn, the "dh" is
        a throaty "gu" sound and the "bh" at the end of Dhubh is basically silent.

        Hope this helps.

        Why not tackle Gaelic? It's a beautiful language and can become another
        obsessive hobby--just what we all need ;-}

        Shel



        Quoting Nancy Carr Zupanic <bearpaws@...>:

        > Greetings all!
        >
        > I'm looking for a basic pronounciation guide as I work on possibly choosing
        > a new name for myself. I've been trying to find pronounciations for
        > interesting names through St. Gabriel's past work archives, but I'm not
        > having any luck.
        >
        > I'm also trying to find what words might be used as descriptive bynames. I
        > only know of Dubh (dark) and Mhor (big). I don't want to be called big, and
        > I don't think I'm very dark (now if I had inherited my Spanish mother's
        > coloring......) Again, the pronounciation issue could be a problem.
        >
        > Muirgheal inghean Labhrainn
        > (called Morel)
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
        > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
        > Version: 7.0.298 / Virus Database: 265.6.3 - Release Date: 21/12/04
        >
        >
        >
        > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
        > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • John McConnell
        What s a good way to learn Gaelic? John McConnell ... From: ebrowder@widomaker.com To: albanach@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, March 13, 2006 5:42 PM Subject:
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 13, 2006
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          What's a good way to learn Gaelic?

          John McConnell

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: ebrowder@...
          To: albanach@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, March 13, 2006 5:42 PM
          Subject: Re: [albanach] Name pronounciations & descriptive bynames?


          Well, there is Donn (Dhonn is feminine pronunced "ghunn") for brown hair, etc,
          Bàn (Bhàn is fem and pronounced "vaan") for fair coloring, and Ruadh (fem. and
          masc.--pronounced ruag) for red heads. Bheag (from beag for small) prononced
          "vick".

          This is all modern Gaelic, which is what I'm learning. I expect that Sharon can
          correct me and provide you with a better naming choices and a pronunciation
          guide for your time as well. Pronounciation can vary considerably regionally
          and certainly
          over time, these very comon words should be approximately the same. Gaelic is
          very gutteral and the "g" sound is very hard and throaty. In beginning of
          these words, "mh" and "bh" produce "v" sounds. In Dhubh and Dhonn, the "dh" is
          a throaty "gu" sound and the "bh" at the end of Dhubh is basically silent.

          Hope this helps.

          Why not tackle Gaelic? It's a beautiful language and can become another
          obsessive hobby--just what we all need ;-}

          Shel



          Quoting Nancy Carr Zupanic <bearpaws@...>:

          > Greetings all!
          >
          > I'm looking for a basic pronounciation guide as I work on possibly choosing
          > a new name for myself. I've been trying to find pronounciations for
          > interesting names through St. Gabriel's past work archives, but I'm not
          > having any luck.
          >
          > I'm also trying to find what words might be used as descriptive bynames. I
          > only know of Dubh (dark) and Mhor (big). I don't want to be called big, and
          > I don't think I'm very dark (now if I had inherited my Spanish mother's
          > coloring......) Again, the pronounciation issue could be a problem.
          >
          > Muirgheal inghean Labhrainn
          > (called Morel)
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
          > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
          > Version: 7.0.298 / Virus Database: 265.6.3 - Release Date: 21/12/04
          >
          >
          >
          > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
          > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >




          This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
          Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.



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        • Nancy Carr Zupanic
          Shel wrote: Well, there is Donn (Dhonn is feminine pronunced ghunn ) for brown hair, etc, Bàn (Bhàn is fem and pronounced vaan ) for fair coloring, and
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 13, 2006
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            Shel wrote:
            Well, there is Donn (Dhonn is feminine pronunced "ghunn") for brown hair,
            etc,
            Bàn (Bhàn is fem and pronounced "vaan") for fair coloring, and Ruadh (fem.
            and
            masc.--pronounced ruag) for red heads. Bheag (from beag for small)
            prononced
            "vick".

            **** Ohhhh, that's great, thank you. Doireann Dhonn. Sounds like
            something to think about, I think.

            This is all modern Gaelic, which is what I'm learning. I expect that Sharon
            can
            correct me and provide you with a better naming choices and a pronunciation
            guide for your time as well. Pronounciation can vary considerably
            regionally
            and certainly
            over time, these very comon words should be approximately the same. Gaelic
            is
            very gutteral and the "g" sound is very hard and throaty. In beginning of
            these words, "mh" and "bh" produce "v" sounds. In Dhubh and Dhonn, the "dh"
            is
            a throaty "gu" sound and the "bh" at the end of Dhubh is basically silent.

            Hope this helps.

            *** Thank you muchly. It certainly does help.

            Why not tackle Gaelic? It's a beautiful language and can become another
            obsessive hobby--just what we all need ;-}

            *** One day I will. I've bought Spanish CDs, in hopes of learning that
            language. But, I have people I can converse with in Spanish, so that helps.
            Gaelic is next on the list, once I find a suitable way to learn the
            language. You know, I've never even heard it spoken, much to my dismay!

            Muirgheal



            --
            Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
            Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
            Version: 7.0.298 / Virus Database: 265.6.3 - Release Date: 21/12/04
          • Matthew A. C. Newsome
            ... -- Matthew A. C. Newsome, FSA Scot Curator of the Scottish Tartans Museum Member of the Guild of Tartan Scholars Homepage: http://www.albanach.org
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 14, 2006
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              On 3/14/06, Nancy Carr Zupanic <bearpaws@...> wrote:
              >
              > Shel wrote:
              > Well, there is Donn (Dhonn is feminine pronunced "ghunn") for brown hair,
              > etc,
              > Bàn (Bhàn is fem and pronounced "vaan") for fair coloring, and Ruadh (fem.
              > and
              > masc.--pronounced ruag) for red heads. Bheag (from beag for small)
              > prononced
              > "vick".
              >
              > **** Ohhhh, that's great, thank you. Doireann Dhonn. Sounds like
              > something to think about, I think.
              >
              > This is all modern Gaelic, which is what I'm learning. I expect that
              > Sharon
              > can
              > correct me and provide you with a better naming choices and a
              > pronunciation
              > guide for your time as well. Pronounciation can vary considerably
              > regionally
              > and certainly
              > over time, these very comon words should be approximately the
              > same. Gaelic
              > is
              > very gutteral and the "g" sound is very hard and throaty. In beginning
              > of
              > these words, "mh" and "bh" produce "v" sounds. In Dhubh and Dhonn, the
              > "dh"
              > is
              > a throaty "gu" sound and the "bh" at the end of Dhubh is basically silent.
              >
              > Hope this helps.
              >
              > *** Thank you muchly. It certainly does help.
              >
              > Why not tackle Gaelic? It's a beautiful language and can become another
              > obsessive hobby--just what we all need ;-}
              >
              > *** One day I will. I've bought Spanish CDs, in hopes of learning that
              > language. But, I have people I can converse with in Spanish, so that
              > helps.
              > Gaelic is next on the list, once I find a suitable way to learn the
              > language. You know, I've never even heard it spoken, much to my dismay!
              >
              > Muirgheal
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
              > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
              > Version: 7.0.298 / Virus Database: 265.6.3 - Release Date: 21/12/04
              >
              >
              >
              > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
              > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >


              --
              Matthew A. C. Newsome, FSA Scot
              Curator of the Scottish Tartans Museum
              Member of the Guild of Tartan Scholars
              Homepage: http://www.albanach.org


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kevin Myers
              a Mhuirgheal, ... You should check out Reidio nan Gaidheal on BBC Scotland s website then, there are learning resources there as well as native fluency
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 14, 2006
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                a'Mhuirgheal,

                --- Nancy Carr Zupanic <bearpaws@...> wrote:

                > Gaelic is next on the list, once I find a suitable way to learn the
                > language. You know, I've never even heard it spoken, much to my
                > dismay!

                You should check out Reidio nan Gaidheal on BBC Scotland's website
                then, there are learning resources there as well as native fluency
                broadcasts (They speak it very fast!)

                Here's the URL:
                http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/alba/

                If you miss a broadcast, go to "Eisd a rithist" (listen again) for a
                list of this past weeks broadcasts--there are news, music programs
                mostly. What is fun is when they present modern hip-hop or pop music in
                gaelic. (ok, so it makes me shudder a little to hear it...)

                OH, and if you need to find a dictionary online--go to
                http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/faclair/sbg/lorg.php
                The page, so far as I've been able to find, is not available in
                English--consider it a basic IQ test! Hint: Lorg means 'search' or
                'find', beurla=english. Have fun!

                le meas,

                Cainnech Ruad mcGuairi

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              • Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn
                ... dismay! ... Murigheal, when we lived in England, several of the BBC radio stations did broadcasts in local languages including Welsh and Irish Gaelic. I m
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 14, 2006
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                  > Gaelic is next on the list, once I find a suitable way to learn the
                  > language. You know, I've never even heard it spoken, much to my
                  dismay!
                  >
                  > Muirgheal

                  Murigheal,
                  when we lived in England, several of the BBC radio stations did
                  broadcasts in local languages including Welsh and Irish Gaelic. I'm
                  not sure about Scots Gaelic, but Irish Gaelic would give you a hint.
                  If you'll google the internet, I know several of the BBC's stations
                  do internet feeds, you might be able to find BBC radio programming
                  in Gaelic - they do news, weather, you name it and it would give you
                  a good taste of the living language.

                  I have this really weird thing with both Gaelic and some of the
                  American Indian dialects when I hear them on CD or spoken. I feel
                  like I'm hearing them from far away and that if I just turn it up
                  loud enough or listen hard enough, I'll understand it - it's like
                  when you hear music played from far away & you can't quite make it
                  out, but know you know the song. Must be some sort of racial memory
                  deep in my lizard brain - grins!

                  Toujours a vos ordres,
                  Margaret Hepburn
                • Nancy Carr Zupanic
                  ... What a great idea, thank you! ... Oh, now I m really curious. I ve really got to hear this. I ve been told that Gaelic is a beautiful language, and that
                  Message 8 of 12 , Mar 14, 2006
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                    Margaret wrote:
                    > when we lived in England, several of the BBC radio stations did
                    > broadcasts in local languages including Welsh and Irish Gaelic. I'm
                    > not sure about Scots Gaelic, but Irish Gaelic would give you a hint.
                    > If you'll google the internet, I know several of the BBC's stations
                    > do internet feeds, you might be able to find BBC radio programming
                    > in Gaelic - they do news, weather, you name it and it would give you
                    > a good taste of the living language.

                    What a great idea, thank you!

                    > I have this really weird thing with both Gaelic and some of the
                    > American Indian dialects when I hear them on CD or spoken. I feel
                    > like I'm hearing them from far away and that if I just turn it up
                    > loud enough or listen hard enough, I'll understand it

                    Oh, now I'm really curious. I've really got to hear this. I've been told
                    that Gaelic is a beautiful language, and that it has a song-like quality to
                    it.

                    Thanks!

                    Muirgheal



                    --
                    Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
                    Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
                    Version: 7.0.298 / Virus Database: 265.6.3 - Release Date: 21/12/04
                  • Muirghein
                    At 06:14 AM 3/14/2006, Margaret Hepburn wrote: ... I ve had the same experience with Lakota, so I know what you mean. Now I m going to have to go listen
                    Message 9 of 12 , Mar 14, 2006
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                      At 06:14 AM 3/14/2006, Margaret Hepburn wrote:
                      <snip>
                      >I have this really weird thing with both Gaelic and some of the
                      >American Indian dialects when I hear them on CD or spoken. I feel
                      >like I'm hearing them from far away and that if I just turn it up
                      >loud enough or listen hard enough, I'll understand it - it's like
                      >when you hear music played from far away & you can't quite make it
                      >out, but know you know the song. Must be some sort of racial memory
                      >deep in my lizard brain - grins!

                      I've had the same experience with Lakota, so I know what you mean.
                      Now I'm going to have to go listen to some Gaelic to see if I have
                      something similar :-).

                      Slan,
                      Baintighearna Muirghein Dhaire Faoilciarach /|\
                      Dreiburgen Web Minister http://www.dreiburgen.org
                      (any posts to e-mail lists do not reflect official
                      opinions unless specifically stated otherwise)
                    • Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn
                      That was great, I think we posted this at the same time. Thanks so much for the link. I spent the afternoon listening to the news in Scots Gaelic! (didn t
                      Message 10 of 12 , Mar 14, 2006
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                        That was great, I think we posted this at the same time. Thanks so
                        much for the link. I spent the afternoon listening to the news in
                        Scots Gaelic! (didn't understand hardly a word except for placenames
                        & proper names, but found it very soothing!)
                        Cheers,
                        Margaret Hepburn
                        > You should check out Reidio nan Gaidheal on BBC Scotland's website
                        > then, there are learning resources there as well as native fluency
                        > broadcasts (They speak it very fast!)
                        >
                        > Here's the URL:
                        > http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/alba/
                        >
                        > If you miss a broadcast, go to "Eisd a rithist" (listen again) for
                        a
                        > list of this past weeks broadcasts--there are news, music programs
                        > mostly. What is fun is when they present modern hip-hop or pop
                        music in
                        > gaelic. (ok, so it makes me shudder a little to hear it...)
                        >
                        > OH, and if you need to find a dictionary online--go to
                        > http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/faclair/sbg/lorg.php
                        > The page, so far as I've been able to find, is not available in
                        > English--consider it a basic IQ test! Hint: Lorg means 'search' or
                        > 'find', beurla=english. Have fun!
                        >
                        > le meas,
                        >
                        > Cainnech Ruad mcGuairi
                        >
                        > __________________________________________________
                        > Do You Yahoo!?
                        > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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                        >
                        > __________________________________________________
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                        >
                      • ebrowder@widomaker.com
                        Hallo a h-uile duine (hello everyone) Reidio nan Gaidheal (BBC Alba) is excellent. They broadcast 69 hours of Gaelic each week (should be all the time on the
                        Message 11 of 12 , Mar 15, 2006
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                          Hallo a h-uile duine (hello everyone)

                          Reidio nan Gaidheal (BBC Alba) is excellent. They broadcast 69 hours of Gaelic
                          each week (should be all the time on the air). Most of the shows before noon
                          British time are entirely in Gaelic and the music tends to be more traditional.
                          There are often telephone interviews with native born speakers and learners.
                          The problem is the 5 hour time difference here on the east coast and 8 on the
                          west coast. I'm usually up at 4:30 AM and listen most mornings.

                          The Gaelic College in Cape Breton Canada offers two on-line courses that are
                          interactive with a teacher who grades lessons. The second course includes
                          twelve twenty minute telephone lessons with the instructor. It ain't cheap
                          but once you finish both, you can continue to acces the course archives. There
                          are six weeks of Gaelic courses in Cape Breton. This year, they will all be
                          total immersion from beginner through advanced.

                          The national organization of Gaelic learners is An Commun Gaidhleach Ameireaga
                          (ACGA) and they have a list of teachers and classes that they know about
                          throughout the US and Canada Their address is:

                          ACGA
                          PO Box 103069
                          Denver, CO 80250

                          They have an immersion weekend every year somewhere in the US and a Mòd as
                          well.
                          Siol Cultural Enterprises (www.gaelicbooks.com) is worth going to because they
                          have a lot of learners materials and music as well.

                          there are a number of sources. Finding someone to converse with is harder. I
                          belong to a group in Richmond, VA that meets one weekend each month and I'm
                          considering starting a study group here in Williamsburg, VA--if I get up the
                          nerve and can find the time.

                          Mise le meas,
                          Seal O'Bruadair (Shel Browder)

                          And "Seal" is not a Gaelic name. It is the way that Shel (Shelton) has to be
                          spelled in Gaelic to retain it's pronunciation.

                          Cum Gàidhlig beò




                          Quoting "Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn" <malvoisine@...>:

                          > That was great, I think we posted this at the same time. Thanks so
                          > much for the link. I spent the afternoon listening to the news in
                          > Scots Gaelic! (didn't understand hardly a word except for placenames
                          > & proper names, but found it very soothing!)
                          > Cheers,
                          > Margaret Hepburn
                          > > You should check out Reidio nan Gaidheal on BBC Scotland's website
                          > > then, there are learning resources there as well as native fluency
                          > > broadcasts (They speak it very fast!)
                          > >
                          > > Here's the URL:
                          > > http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/alba/
                          > >
                          > > If you miss a broadcast, go to "Eisd a rithist" (listen again) for
                          > a
                          > > list of this past weeks broadcasts--there are news, music programs
                          > > mostly. What is fun is when they present modern hip-hop or pop
                          > music in
                          > > gaelic. (ok, so it makes me shudder a little to hear it...)
                          > >
                          > > OH, and if you need to find a dictionary online--go to
                          > > http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/faclair/sbg/lorg.php
                          > > The page, so far as I've been able to find, is not available in
                          > > English--consider it a basic IQ test! Hint: Lorg means 'search' or
                          > > 'find', beurla=english. Have fun!
                          > >
                          > > le meas,
                          > >
                          > > Cainnech Ruad mcGuairi
                          > >
                          > > __________________________________________________
                          > > Do You Yahoo!?
                          > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                          > > http://mail.yahoo.com
                          > >
                          > > __________________________________________________
                          > > Do You Yahoo!?
                          > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                          > > http://mail.yahoo.com
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
                          > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • Kevin Myers
                          ... S e do bheatha! You re welcome! Frequently I only get but little else than placenames and the occasional word also. They usually have the text of the news
                          Message 12 of 12 , Mar 16, 2006
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                            --- "Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn" <malvoisine@...>
                            wrote:

                            > That was great, I think we posted this at the same time. Thanks so
                            > much for the link. I spent the afternoon listening to the news in
                            > Scots Gaelic! (didn't understand hardly a word except for placenames
                            > & proper names, but found it very soothing!)

                            'S e do bheatha!

                            You're welcome!

                            Frequently I only get but little else than placenames and the
                            occasional word also. They usually have the text of the news broadcasts
                            on the website, and I follow along with that, it helps a great deal to
                            learn the pronounciation--and helps with comprehension too--being far
                            better at reading it than hearing it. Alas, my current computer is
                            lacking speakers....

                            -Cainnech




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