Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Comment in Gaelic?

Expand Messages
  • Diana Cosby
    Does anyone know how to say, You re safe now, in Gaelic? Thank you in advance. Diana Cosby -- 2005 Fool For Love Finalist www.dianacosby.com Romance Edged
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 5, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Does anyone know how to say, "You're safe now," in Gaelic? Thank you in
      advance.
      Diana Cosby

      --
      2005 Fool For Love Finalist
      www.dianacosby.com
      Romance Edged With Danger
    • ebrowder@widomaker.com
      Gaelic is not always straightford in such statements. I m assuming that you mean that to be stated with emphasis, which determines word choice and order. S e
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 6, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Gaelic is not always straightford in such statements. I'm assuming that you
        mean that to be stated with emphasis, which determines word choice and order.

        'S e sàbhailte a th'agad fhèin a-nis. Phonetically that could be

        Shay savalchu a ha kud heen a nish.

        If you mean safe as in you have found refuge, it would be slightly different.

        Beannachd leat,
        Seal

        Quoting Diana Cosby <wulfe6@...>:

        > Does anyone know how to say, "You're safe now," in Gaelic? Thank you in
        > advance.
        > Diana Cosby
        >
        > --
        > 2005 Fool For Love Finalist
        > www.dianacosby.com
        > Romance Edged With Danger
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
        > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Diana Cosby
        ebrowder@widomaker.com wrote: Gaelic is not always straightford in such statements. I m assuming that you mean that to be stated with emphasis, which
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 6, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          ebrowder@... wrote: Gaelic is not always straightford in such
          statements. I'm assuming that you mean that to be stated with emphasis,
          which determines word choice and order.

          > 'S e sàbhailte a th'agad fhèin a-nis. Phonetically that could be
          >
          > Shay savalchu a ha kud heen a nish.
          >
          > If you mean safe as in you have found refuge, it would be slightly
          > different.

          ~Seal, thank you very much for your reply. I mean safe as in, "No one
          will harm you." Have a nice day.
          Diana

          2005 Fool For Love Finalist
          www.dianacosby.com
          Romance Edged With Danger
        • Sharon L. Krossa
          ... Note that this is modern Scottish Gaelic -- circa 1300 (which if I recall correctly is your period of interest) it would have been at least slightly
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 6, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            At 5:36 AM -0400 10/6/05, Unspecified wrote:
            >Gaelic is not always straightford in such statements. I'm assuming that you
            >mean that to be stated with emphasis, which determines word choice and order.
            >
            >'S e sàbhailte a th'agad fhèin a-nis. Phonetically that could be

            Note that this is modern Scottish Gaelic -- circa
            1300 (which if I recall correctly is your period
            of interest) it would have been at least slightly
            different. For example, at a minimum the first
            part <'S e> would at a minimum have been spelled
            out <Is e>, and likewise <th'agad> as <tha agad>,
            and there would be no dash in <a-nis>, even
            assuming that this would have been the general
            construction in Common Classical Gaelic.

            Sharon
            --
            Sharon Krossa, skrossa-ml@...
            Resources for Scottish history, names, clothing, language & more:
            Medieval Scotland - http://MedievalScotland.org/
          • ebrowder@widomaker.com
            And regardless of the spelling, an equally important question would be the pronounciation which is different as to place and time. Words are pronounced
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 7, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              And regardless of the spelling, an equally important question would be the
              pronounciation which is different as to place and time. Words are pronounced
              differently in Lewis and Harris. No one reeally knows how those words were
              pronounced in the middle ages 'cause there wern't no tape recorders there.
              Even now, spelling in modern Scots Gaelic varies a good bit and reading things
              written as little as fifty years ago illustrates that very well. "Is e" is
              still correct spelling, but it is pronounced " 'S e" and in this case, the
              spelling is following the common pronunciation. I'm no expert, but I suspect
              that for your time period, older Irish Gaelic would be equally correct.

              Beannachd leibh,
              Seal



              Quoting "Sharon L. Krossa" <skrossa-ml@...>:

              > At 5:36 AM -0400 10/6/05, Unspecified wrote:
              > >Gaelic is not always straightford in such statements. I'm assuming that
              > you
              > >mean that to be stated with emphasis, which determines word choice and
              > order.
              > >
              > >'S e sàbhailte a th'agad fhèin a-nis. Phonetically that could be
              >
              > Note that this is modern Scottish Gaelic -- circa
              > 1300 (which if I recall correctly is your period
              > of interest) it would have been at least slightly
              > different. For example, at a minimum the first
              > part <'S e> would at a minimum have been spelled
              > out <Is e>, and likewise <th'agad> as <tha agad>,
              > and there would be no dash in <a-nis>, even
              > assuming that this would have been the general
              > construction in Common Classical Gaelic.
              >
              > Sharon
              > --
              > Sharon Krossa, skrossa-ml@...
              > Resources for Scottish history, names, clothing, language & more:
              > Medieval Scotland - http://MedievalScotland.org/
              >
              >
              >
              > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
              > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.