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Shoes/Boots

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  • mccobalt
    You all have been quite helpful on my question about hats! How about a question about shoes? My persona (in case it s been forgotten;-) is early 15C Scottish
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 25, 2005
      You all have been quite helpful on my question about hats! How about a
      question about shoes? My persona (in case it's been forgotten;-) is
      early 15C Scottish Highlander. I like this boot:

      http://www.zappos.com/n/p/dp/402072/c/106/reviewcount/15.html#mr

      I've seen the ones from:

      http://www.medievalmoccasins.com/

      Not sure I'm crazy about them (plus they are pricey). Would the
      Minnetonka be way to out of it or could I get away with it?

      Thanks!

      John
    • Allen Hansen
      Barefeet or a sort of hide mocassin affair would have been the norm I think. ... about a ... is
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 26, 2005
        Barefeet or a sort of hide mocassin affair would have been the norm I
        think.
        > You all have been quite helpful on my question about hats! How
        about a
        > question about shoes? My persona (in case it's been forgotten;-)
        is
        > early 15C Scottish Highlander. I like this boot:
        >
        > http://www.zappos.com/n/p/dp/402072/c/106/reviewcount/15.html#mr
        >
        > I've seen the ones from:
        >
        > http://www.medievalmoccasins.com/
        >
        > Not sure I'm crazy about them (plus they are pricey). Would the
        > Minnetonka be way to out of it or could I get away with it?
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
        > John
      • Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn
        It really depends on what you want out of your shoe & where you are going. If you just want to get your feet covered and aren t really concerned about
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
          It really depends on what you want out of your shoe & where you are
          going. If you just want to get your feet covered and aren't really
          concerned about authenticity, then either of these are fine. They are
          both common SCA defaults, much like the Bald Mountain boots and their
          ilk, but none of them are period. The 2nd type you list here has for
          years in the SCA been the default 'Celtic' shoe. It's similar to
          period types (at least the ankle high ones - the ones that lace up to
          the knee I've only ever seen on Victorian greek goddesses....), but
          I've seen no documentation for the actual cut of the shoe and doubt
          it's period. It's really not a very practical shoe if you've ever worn
          them. Marc Carlson's website is one of the best with documentation for
          period shoes. Here are links to the Irish/Scottish shoes. I think
          these will give you a better idea of what's period for you. As the
          previous post said, bare feet or rough hide shoes would most likely be
          the default, sometimes called cuarans or brogs. There is some later
          anecdotal evidence for Highlanders wearing 'town' shoes when in the
          Lowlands, but it's late 16th century.

          http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOES/SHOE56.HTM
          http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOES/SHOE57.HTM
          http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOES/SHOE55.HTM

          This is the main page of the shoe stuff - lots of links & very good
          info.
          http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOEHOME.HTM
          Again, good luck with your looking,
          Toujours a vos ordres,
          Margaret Hepburn


          > > You all have been quite helpful on my question about hats! How
          > about a
          > > question about shoes? My persona (in case it's been forgotten;-)
          > is
          > > early 15C Scottish Highlander. I like this boot:
          > >
          > > http://www.zappos.com/n/p/dp/402072/c/106/reviewcount/15.html#mr
          > >
          > > I've seen the ones from:
          > >
          > > http://www.medievalmoccasins.com/
          > >
          > > Not sure I'm crazy about them (plus they are pricey). Would the
          > > Minnetonka be way to out of it or could I get away with it?
          > >
          > > Thanks!
          > >
          > > John
        • Allen Hansen
          I know one shouldn t jump to conclusiosn, but British soldiers in the Iberian Peninsula during the early 1800s adopted the local method, when their boots
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
            I know one shouldn't jump to conclusiosn, but British soldiers in the
            Iberian Peninsula during the early 1800s adopted the local method,
            when their boots disintegrated, of place a foot on a piece of hide
            and cutting around it, to form a shoe which was then laced up.
            Highlanders were a pretty practical bunch, wouldn't be surprised if
            they used that method.
            Now that anecdotal evidence of 'town' shoes, perhaps a rich visitor
            dandyfied himself and his attendants up.
            > It really depends on what you want out of your shoe & where you are
            > going. If you just want to get your feet covered and aren't really
            > concerned about authenticity, then either of these are fine. They
            are
            > both common SCA defaults, much like the Bald Mountain boots and
            their
            > ilk, but none of them are period. The 2nd type you list here has
            for
            > years in the SCA been the default 'Celtic' shoe. It's similar to
            > period types (at least the ankle high ones - the ones that lace up
            to
            > the knee I've only ever seen on Victorian greek goddesses....), but
            > I've seen no documentation for the actual cut of the shoe and doubt
            > it's period. It's really not a very practical shoe if you've ever
            worn
            > them. Marc Carlson's website is one of the best with documentation
            for
            > period shoes. Here are links to the Irish/Scottish shoes. I think
            > these will give you a better idea of what's period for you. As the
            > previous post said, bare feet or rough hide shoes would most likely
            be
            > the default, sometimes called cuarans or brogs. There is some later
            > anecdotal evidence for Highlanders wearing 'town' shoes when in the
            > Lowlands, but it's late 16th century.
            >
            > http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOES/SHOE56.HTM
            > http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOES/SHOE57.HTM
            > http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOES/SHOE55.HTM
            >
            > This is the main page of the shoe stuff - lots of links & very good
            > info.
            > http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/SHOEHOME.HTM
            > Again, good luck with your looking,
            > Toujours a vos ordres,
            > Margaret Hepburn
          • Kevin Myers
            That s pretty much the method mentioned in a mid sixteenth century letter to the king of England written by Bishop Lesley (I think) describing the manners and
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
              That's pretty much the method mentioned in a mid sixteenth century
              letter to the king of England written by Bishop Lesley (I think)
              describing the manners and appearance of the Highland Scots. He
              referred to himself and to other Highlanders as "Reddeshanks" mostly
              because of this shoe-making practice (or because they went around in
              all weather without trousers on--I'm at work and don't have the
              reference to look at)
              See McClintock, "Old Irish and Highland Dress"

              -Cainnech

              --- Allen Hansen <kapudanpasha@...> wrote:

              > I know one shouldn't jump to conclusiosn, but British soldiers in the
              > Iberian Peninsula during the early 1800s adopted the local method,
              > when their boots disintegrated, of place a foot on a piece of hide
              > and cutting around it, to form a shoe which was then laced up.
              > Highlanders were a pretty practical bunch, wouldn't be surprised if
              > they used that method.

              Weren't there also Highland troops serving in Iberia? I've seen claims
              that this style of shoe was still worn in rural Ireland well into the
              late 19th century but I can't remember the source.



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            • Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn
              It s really not too far of a jump, if you look at the three shoes I gave, that s basically what they are, just with a little shaping, to my mind, to save on
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 27, 2005
                It's really not too far of a jump, if you look at the three shoes I
                gave, that's basically what they are, just with a little shaping, to
                my mind, to save on the leather. Most of the anecdotal evidence for
                Highland shoes is just that - a piece of hide, fur on the inside or
                just barefoot. But, most modern people's feet are not that tough,
                most of us wear shoes most of the time (until I hit high school I
                could walk barefoot on hot Houston summer concrete, but can't
                anymore). A little shaping to the shoe means you could add an
                insole, or arch support, or whatever was needed. Authenticity is
                fabulous and something I strive for, but I'd rather have an arch
                support in my period shoes than be crying on the drive home at the
                end of an event because my feet hurt so bad.
                Cheers,
                Margaret Hepburn
                --- In albanach@yahoogroups.com, "Allen Hansen" <kapudanpasha@y...>
                wrote:
                > I know one shouldn't jump to conclusiosn, but British soldiers in
                the
                > Iberian Peninsula during the early 1800s adopted the local method,
                > when their boots disintegrated, of place a foot on a piece of hide
                > and cutting around it, to form a shoe which was then laced up.
                > Highlanders were a pretty practical bunch, wouldn't be surprised
                if
                > they used that method.
                > Now that anecdotal evidence of 'town' shoes, perhaps a rich
                visitor
                > dandyfied himself and his attendants up.
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