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Re: Medieval Scottish Burghs

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  • Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn
    Your English was fine. What I was saying was that you might have better luck & get a better answer with a more specific question. Most everyone on this list
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 15, 2005
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      Your English was fine. What I was saying was that you might have
      better luck & get a better answer with a more specific question.
      Most everyone on this list that's into a lot of research kind of
      specializes. Sharon Krossa/Euphrick probably has the broadest base
      of well researched knowledge. For instance, my research tends to
      focus on Lowlanders, especially in Ayrshire and in Glasgow, but the
      bulk of the written knowledge for this tends to focus on Edinburgh
      and I don't have too much to say right off the bat about the
      relationships of Highlanders and lowland townspeople, hasn't really
      come into my scope. I will happily look in what I've got though &
      see if I have any citations. But, there very well might be someone
      on this list with lots of knowledge about Cromarty or Clan
      Mackenzie, etc. which was why I suggested being a little more
      specific..---
      In albanach@yahoogroups.com, "simoneboscolo" <simoneboscolo@y...>
      wrote:
      > Thank you for the answer. My question was about relationship
      between
      > Gaelic Highland Clans and burghs population. For example:the burgh
      > of Cromarty was in XVI° sec. in the lands of Clan Mackenzie.
      > Undoubtely Cromarty was also inhabitated by some Mackenzie, some
      > Munro, some Ross. But this Mackenzie, or Munro, or Ross, born in
      the
      > burgh of Cromarty was loyal to his original clan (war, fiery
      cross,
      > childhood from his chief family, exc.) or culturally was a world
      > apart.
      > Sorry for my english but write in a foreign language is more
      > difficult than speak or read it to me.
      > Simone.
      >
    • ebrowder@widomaker.com
      Simone, your English is understandable and I don t think that many of us speak Italian. I don t, anyway. You do not need to apologize. It is nice to see
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 15, 2005
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        Simone, your English is understandable and I don't think that many of us speak
        Italian. I don't, anyway. You do not need to apologize. It is nice to see
        your posts.

        Shelton


        Quoting simoneboscolo <simoneboscolo@...>:

        > Thank you for the answer. My question was about relationship between
        > Gaelic Highland Clans and burghs population. For example:the burgh
        > of Cromarty was in XVI° sec. in the lands of Clan Mackenzie.
        > Undoubtely Cromarty was also inhabitated by some Mackenzie, some
        > Munro, some Ross. But this Mackenzie, or Munro, or Ross, born in the
        > burgh of Cromarty was loyal to his original clan (war, fiery cross,
        > childhood from his chief family, exc.) or culturally was a world
        > apart.
        > Sorry for my english but write in a foreign language is more
        > difficult than speak or read it to me.
        > Simone.
        >
        > --- In albanach@yahoogroups.com, "Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret
        > Hepburn" <malvoisine@y...> wrote:
        > > That's kind of a complicated question to answer. If you are asking
        > > about Lowland Clans, there weren't any, per se. There were large
        > > families, with close kinship ties, but nothing like the Gaelic
        > Clan
        > > system. Unless a Clan member relocated to the Lowlands to live,
        > then I
        > > would imagine their relationship with the citizenship of towns &
        > > burghs would be pretty much what you would expect. They were
        > different
        > > cultures, in some cases speaking a completely different language,
        > but
        > > were still from the same country. Highlanders did a lot of trade
        > > through the Lowlands. The Lowlands had very little true industry,
        > but
        > > there was even less in the Highlands and they would have a need to
        > > trade for things that couldn't be manufactured or gotten further
        > > north. The Highlanders would bring their cattle, sheep and sheep
        > goods
        > > (skins & wools) down to the towns for trade & export.
        > >
        > > Post 1560, you have a little more stress as the Lowlands slowly
        > > converted to Protestantism and the Highlands stayed mainly
        > Catholic,
        > > well into the 18th century (this is a BROAD generalization). You
        > don't
        > > have what I would consider real political strife between north and
        > > south until the 18th century with the Jacobite question.
        > >
        > > I think there is some perceived prejudice on both sides in the
        > 16th
        > > centuries - with Lowlands thinking the Highlanders were primitive,
        > > wild, what have you & with Highlanders thinking the Lowlands were
        > > too 'English', but again, that's a broad generalization.
        > >
        > > You might have better luck with a more specific question, i.e. if
        > you
        > > mean religion, or trade or intermarriage or whatever.
        > >
        > > Cheers,
        > > Margaret Hepburn
        > >
        > > --- In albanach@yahoogroups.com, "simoneboscolo"
        > <simoneboscolo@y...>
        > > wrote:
        > > > I've read on Mrs Krossa's "Medieval Scotland" that the
        > citizenship
        > > of
        > > > town and burghs in Scotland, whatever in Gaelic speaking
        > domaine,
        > > was
        > > > of Inglish or Lowlander culture and language and burghs had
        > their
        > > own
        > > > ruling sistem. But what kind of relationships there was beetwen
        > Clan
        > > > chiefs, Clan sistem and burgh's citizenship in Scotland until
        > XVII°
        > > > sec.?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
        > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
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