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German Woodcut

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  • simoneboscolo
    I ve a question about a German woodcut showing four soldiers in tartan, depicted in Thirty Ears War in Stettin. They are part of Scottish Mackay s regiment but
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 12, 2005
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      I've a question about a German woodcut showing four soldiers in
      tartan, depicted in Thirty Ears War in Stettin. They are part of
      Scottish Mackay's regiment but they are described like "Irrlander"
      or "Ersche", Irish. I know that English or Lowlander speakers had
      called Scottish Gaelic as "Irish language" or "Erse". It is possible
      that this "Irrlander" define this four soldiers as gaelic speakers?
    • Allen Hansen
      Definetly, and in fact, there were more Scottish mercenaries and merchants along the Baltic seaboard than Irish. Some of them even had famous descendants, such
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 12, 2005
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        Definetly, and in fact, there were more Scottish mercenaries and
        merchants along the Baltic seaboard than Irish. Some of them even had
        famous descendants, such as the Russian poet Lermontov.
        > I've a question about a German woodcut showing four soldiers in
        > tartan, depicted in Thirty Ears War in Stettin. They are part of
        > Scottish Mackay's regiment but they are described like "Irrlander"
        > or "Ersche", Irish. I know that English or Lowlander speakers had
        > called Scottish Gaelic as "Irish language" or "Erse". It is possible
        > that this "Irrlander" define this four soldiers as gaelic speakers?
      • ebrowder@widomaker.com
        It is my understanding that until the 16th century, the Gaelic peoples of the West Highlands and Islands identified culturaly with the Irish and the language
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 14, 2005
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          It is my understanding that until the 16th century, the Gaelic peoples of the
          West Highlands and Islands identified culturaly with the Irish and the language
          was sstill basically the same. Certainly their stories indicate that. There
          seems to be no indication of cultural identity with the non Gaelic speaking
          parts of Scotland.

          Shel


          Quoting Allen Hansen <kapudanpasha@...>:

          > Definetly, and in fact, there were more Scottish mercenaries and
          > merchants along the Baltic seaboard than Irish. Some of them even had
          > famous descendants, such as the Russian poet Lermontov.
          > > I've a question about a German woodcut showing four soldiers in
          > > tartan, depicted in Thirty Ears War in Stettin. They are part of
          > > Scottish Mackay's regiment but they are described like "Irrlander"
          > > or "Ersche", Irish. I know that English or Lowlander speakers had
          > > called Scottish Gaelic as "Irish language" or "Erse". It is possible
          > > that this "Irrlander" define this four soldiers as gaelic speakers?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
          > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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