Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

surname origins; Browder and Hall

Expand Messages
  • ebrowder@widomaker.com
    I m not asking for SCA purposes but I would appreciate a reply pointing me in the right direction. Browder, my surname, was from all the evidence I can find
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 3, 2005
      I'm not asking for SCA purposes but I would appreciate a reply pointing me in
      the right direction. Browder, my surname, was from all the evidence I can find
      anglicized from the Irish name O'Bruadair in the 17th century. My mother's
      maiden name was Hall. I have not yet found any good reference to it's origins,
      though the name was found all over Scotland by mid 19th cent--as wellas other
      places and they seem to have been part of the Welsh settlers in Southeastern
      NC--at least a bunch of them married into the Welsh families there. Of course,
      there were bunches of Scots and Welsh who settled all the reaches of the Cape
      Fear River. Searches on the net have not "netted" me much reliable
      information, so any directional assistance to good references would be
      appreciated.

      Tapaidh leibh,
      Shel
    • Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn
      Dear Shel, I found a couple of things online about the name Browder. Some of the surname/family history websites also link it to the surname Broderick but I
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 6, 2005
        Dear Shel,
        I found a couple of things online about the name Browder. Some of
        the surname/family history websites also link it to the
        surname 'Broderick' but I can't give you any good evidence for that,
        but see later below on that. I also found a genealogy website that
        purports to have info on the Browder family in Virginia, here's the
        link if you want to contact the person listed
        http://www.dcoweb.org/gsnf/listb.htm

        Something else you might consider for Browder is that it was
        originally an occupational surname in Scotland. Browder is not
        listed in Black as a surname (at least for a heading, it might be in
        there somewhere), but the online Dictionary of the Scottish language
        gives the following citations for the word:

        Browder, n. [App. from the verb.] Embroidery. — Thocht now, in
        browdir and begary, Sche glansis, as scho war Queine of Fary; Rob
        Stene 3.

        Browder, Brouder, v. Also: browdour, brouther. [Late ME. browder
        (1455), broudre, irreg. f. OF. brouder Browd v. Cf. Broder v.] tr.
        To embroider. (Chiefly in p.p.) (a) Quhair is thy chalmer … With
        burely bed and bankouris browderit bene? Henr. Test. Cress. 417.
        With quhyt hattis all browderit rycht bravelie; Dunb. lxxvii. 44.
        Ane chessable of blak velvus browderit … with gold; 1529 Antiq. [I
        cut this off, it is a long citation]
        So it is very possible if this is an occupational surname, that
        originally the surname was something completely different, i.e. Rob
        MacGregor who was a Browderer, became Rob the Browder, which simply
        became Rob Browder, in order to distinguish him from all the other
        Robert MacGregors in his area.... (but that is just a flight of
        fancy - don't quote me on that!)

        You also mentioned that is might have come from the Irish name O
        Bruadair ( there are some diacritical accent marks here that I can't
        render in an email.. if you want a full, correct citation with
        accents intact, email me & I can send an attachment to you).

        Here is what O Currain & Maguire give for the name in 'Irish Names'
        a fairly standard SCA name source:
        BRUATUR:BRUADAR: O Rahilly declares that this name was borrowed on
        Irish soil from a language like Welsh. It was a relatively common
        name in the south of Ireland in the early period. It gives rise to
        the surname O Bruadair (Broder, Broderick)

        So this is probably where the Browder/Broderick link comes from. I
        don't know if any of this is useful, but there you are.

        ( I was curious because I have an great-uncle in Texas whose last
        name is Browder....my grandmother's family also has some Halls in
        South Carolina - maybe we're related! (grins))

        Toujours a vos ordres,
        Margaret Hepburn

        --- In albanach@yahoogroups.com, "" <ebrowder@w...> wrote:
        > I'm not asking for SCA purposes but I would appreciate a reply
        pointing me in
        > the right direction. Browder, my surname, was from all the
        evidence I can find
        > anglicized from the Irish name O'Bruadair in the 17th century.
        >>snippage<<
      • ebrowder@widomaker.com
        Dear Margret, Thank you very much. This is excellent information. I would indeed appreciate an attachment with the accent marks on O Bruadair. The Browders
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 7, 2005
          Dear Margret,

          Thank you very much. This is excellent information. I would indeed appreciate
          an attachment with the accent marks on O' Bruadair.

          The Browders came into Virginia around 1655 and spread from there into North
          Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Kentucky, etc. Browders, Kentucky is a town.
          Perhaps we are cousins.

          Thank you for your help (Tapaidh leat airson do chuideachadhd)

          Mise le meas,
          Shel
          Quoting "Julie Stackable, SCA Margaret Hepburn" <malvoisine@...>:

          >
          >
          > Dear Shel,
          > I found a couple of things online about the name Browder. Some of
          > the surname/family history websites also link it to the
          > surname 'Broderick' but I can't give you any good evidence for that,
          > but see later below on that. I also found a genealogy website that
          > purports to have info on the Browder family in Virginia, here's the
          > link if you want to contact the person listed
          > http://www.dcoweb.org/gsnf/listb.htm
          >
          > Something else you might consider for Browder is that it was
          > originally an occupational surname in Scotland. Browder is not
          > listed in Black as a surname (at least for a heading, it might be in
          > there somewhere), but the online Dictionary of the Scottish language
          > gives the following citations for the word:
          >
          > Browder, n. [App. from the verb.] Embroidery. — Thocht now, in
          > browdir and begary, Sche glansis, as scho war Queine of Fary; Rob
          > Stene 3.
          >
          > Browder, Brouder, v. Also: browdour, brouther. [Late ME. browder
          > (1455), broudre, irreg. f. OF. brouder Browd v. Cf. Broder v.] tr.
          > To embroider. (Chiefly in p.p.) (a) Quhair is thy chalmer … With
          > burely bed and bankouris browderit bene? Henr. Test. Cress. 417.
          > With quhyt hattis all browderit rycht bravelie; Dunb. lxxvii. 44.
          > Ane chessable of blak velvus browderit … with gold; 1529 Antiq. [I
          > cut this off, it is a long citation]
          > So it is very possible if this is an occupational surname, that
          > originally the surname was something completely different, i.e. Rob
          > MacGregor who was a Browderer, became Rob the Browder, which simply
          > became Rob Browder, in order to distinguish him from all the other
          > Robert MacGregors in his area.... (but that is just a flight of
          > fancy - don't quote me on that!)
          >
          > You also mentioned that is might have come from the Irish name O
          > Bruadair ( there are some diacritical accent marks here that I can't
          > render in an email.. if you want a full, correct citation with
          > accents intact, email me & I can send an attachment to you).
          >
          > Here is what O Currain & Maguire give for the name in 'Irish Names'
          > a fairly standard SCA name source:
          > BRUATUR:BRUADAR: O Rahilly declares that this name was borrowed on
          > Irish soil from a language like Welsh. It was a relatively common
          > name in the south of Ireland in the early period. It gives rise to
          > the surname O Bruadair (Broder, Broderick)
          >
          > So this is probably where the Browder/Broderick link comes from. I
          > don't know if any of this is useful, but there you are.
          >
          > ( I was curious because I have an great-uncle in Texas whose last
          > name is Browder....my grandmother's family also has some Halls in
          > South Carolina - maybe we're related! (grins))
          >
          > Toujours a vos ordres,
          > Margaret Hepburn
          >
          > --- In albanach@yahoogroups.com, "" <ebrowder@w...> wrote:
          > > I'm not asking for SCA purposes but I would appreciate a reply
          > pointing me in
          > > the right direction. Browder, my surname, was from all the
          > evidence I can find
          > > anglicized from the Irish name O'Bruadair in the 17th century.
          > >>snippage<<
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > This is Albanach, a group devoted to the study and re-enactment of
          > Scotland c. 503-1603 AD.
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.