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Re: [albanach] Hail unto the list

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  • Matt Newsome
    Gavine, For a lowland persona c. 1550s, simply forget about the kilt. What we would call Highland Dress would be completely foreign to your persona. We
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 3, 2003
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      Gavine,

      For a lowland persona c. 1550s, simply forget about the kilt. What
      we would call "Highland Dress" would be completely foreign to your
      persona. We tend to forget that the lowland and highland cultures
      were rather foreign to each other. Your persona would have spoken
      Inglis (English, or what we would term today Scots), worn clothing
      very much like his English neighbors to the south, and have been
      reared in a rather feudal system of land ownership and social structure.
      Depending on exaclty when in the sixteenth century you are placing
      him, he would be Protestant Presbyterian, or at least be heavily
      pressured by law and society to be so.

      Now, a Highland Scot in the same time period would have spoken Gaelic,
      worn elaborate leinte (long, full tunics) that would have been rather
      odd looking to the non-Gaelic observer, and by the end of the century
      could have been wearing the tartan wrap, the feileadh-mor. He would
      very likely have been reared in a clan social structure. He may
      be aware of the Reformation as some trouble happening in the south,
      but he and his family would for the most part be unaffected by it.


      Your lowland persona would have much stronger ties to your English
      neighbors just a stone's throw over the border. The Highlander would
      have much more contact with the Irish. You would likely consider
      a Highlander and anything to do with Highland culture rather barbaric.
      In short, would he have even wanted to wear a kilt? No!

      For inspiration about your clothing, look to sources that deal with
      English clothes from the same time period. Although there were some
      weapons and armor styles that seemed to have been favored by the
      Border Scots. Osprey has a book out in their Men-at-Arms series
      dealing with the Border Reviers that is quite good and well illustrated.
      This would be an excellent first source for you.

      Good luck!
      Aye,
      Eogan


      Albanach.org
      Scottish History -- Highland Dress
    • scotsfencer@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/3/03 10:16:48 AM Eastern Daylight Time, amergin3084@yahoo.com writes:
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 3, 2003
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        In a message dated 9/3/03 10:16:48 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
        amergin3084@... writes:

        << since you are concerned with "lowlanders", wearing the kilt is not a
        problem. The kilt and breacan (plaid) are Highland in origin and so the lowlanders
        wouldn't have
        worn them. >>

        I have seen research also that the lowlanders DID wear kilts, just not the
        great kilt. I'll have to remember where I saw that and read it again.
      • Sharon L. Krossa
        ... I think you may be confusing wearing of kilts, which is either a modern thing (small kilt) or else a purely Highland thing (belted plaid aka great kilt )
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 3, 2003
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          At 1:37 PM -0400 9/3/03, scotsfencer@... wrote:
          >In a message dated 9/3/03 10:16:48 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
          >amergin3084@... writes:
          >
          ><< since you are concerned with "lowlanders", wearing the kilt is not a
          >problem. The kilt and breacan (plaid) are Highland in origin and so
          >the lowlanders
          >wouldn't have
          > worn them. >>
          >
          >I have seen research also that the lowlanders DID wear kilts, just not the
          >great kilt. I'll have to remember where I saw that and read it again.

          I think you may be confusing wearing of kilts, which is either a
          modern thing (small kilt) or else a purely Highland thing (belted
          plaid aka "great kilt") with wearing of plaids (unbelted), which was
          done in both Highlands and Lowlands (see my other post), or else
          recalling that there is some evidence (perhaps 17th century? I can't
          recall) that at least sometimes when Lowlanders went on hunting trips
          to the Highlands, they dressed in local style (so, didn't wear
          Highland-style attire normally, but only when "going native" on
          hunting trips in the Highlands). But normally Lowlanders dressed more
          or less like the English and NW continental Europeans.

          That being said, if you do come across evidence that Lowlanders wore
          their plaids belted in SCA period, I'd love to know of it!

          Sharon, ska Africa
          --
          Sharon L. Krossa, skrossa-ml@...
        • Sharon L. Krossa
          ... A small correction. While the kilt in the sense of a plaid worn belted or great kilt was purely Highland (and of course a kilt in the sense of a modern
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 3, 2003
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            At 7:12 AM -0700 9/3/03, amergin3084 wrote:
            >I haven't done any research on sailors but since you
            >are concerned with "lowlanders", wearing the kilt is
            >not a problem. The kilt and breacan (plaid) are
            >Highland in origin and so the lowlanders wouldn't have
            >worn them.

            A small correction. While the "kilt" in the sense of a plaid worn
            belted or "great kilt" was purely Highland (and of course a kilt in
            the sense of a modern small kilt is modern ;-), Lowlanders did wear
            plaids -- that is, rectangular length of tartan cloth worn as a
            mantle/shawl. They may not have worn them in the same fashion as
            Highlanders did, but many Lowlanders did wear them (especially women
            of all classes and at least rural men of lower classes). Note that
            the plaid is an outer garment -- a mantle/shawl -- not a main garment
            worn at all times throughout the day like a skirt, shirt, or tunic.
            Rather, it was worn pretty much in the same circumstances when a
            cloak would be worn -- when cold, in bad weather, outside, etc.

            Other than (some) Lowlanders wearing plaids, though, generally
            Lowland clothing was more or less the same as English and/or
            north-west continental clothing of the same era. So you might try
            seeing if you can find information on what English sailors wore circa
            1500.

            Sharon, ska Affrick

            PS Of course, circa 1500 is some 94 years before the first clear
            evidence of a plaid worn belted even in the Highlands and Western
            Isles!
            --
            Sharon Krossa, skrossa-ml@...
            Resources for Scottish history, names, clothing, language & more:
            Medieval Scotland - http://www.MedievalScotland.org/
          • Matthew Newsome
            ... After the unpopular Union of the Parliaments in 1707 (or so) some lowland nationalists did begin to look more favorably upon Highland dress. (I think at
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 4, 2003
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              scotsfencer@... wrote:

              > I have seen research also that the lowlanders DID wear kilts, just not
              > the
              > great kilt. I'll have to remember where I saw that and read it again.

              After the unpopular Union of the Parliaments in 1707 (or so) some
              lowland nationalists did begin to look more favorably upon Highland
              dress. (I think at this point the English were unpopular enough among
              the southers Scots that they'd rather affiliate themselves with those
              "barbarians" to the north than the English). But certainly the kilt was
              never a "daily dress" item for them. When you get into the nineteenth
              century, you'd certainly have Scots of lowland origin donning the kilt
              on certain special occasions as ceremonial garb. But I can't think of a
              time when the kilt was ever a part of the day-to-day clothing of the
              Lowlander.
              Aye,
              Eogan

              --
              Matthew A. C. Newsome
              http://albanach.org
              Highland Dress Historian
              Catholic Apologist

              TURRIS FORTIS Catholic Apologetics
              on line at http://turrisfortis.com

              "To whom shall we go?" -- St. Peter
              John 6:68
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