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Semi-OT Old Irish question

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  • Muirghein
    Since this involves Old Irish, I felt it not entirely off-topic :-). ... Since the two translations of the phrase are somewhat different, I wanted to run it by
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 27 4:35 PM
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      Since this involves Old Irish, I felt it not entirely off-topic :-).

      >To: Druid@yahoogroups.com
      >Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 23:21:41 -0000
      >Subject: [Druid] Re: another.02
      >
      >--- In Druid@yahoogroups.com, Morgan wrote:
      > > That bit from Excalibur, which I'm given to understand is
      > > basically Welsh gibberish (despite it's appearance in "21
      > > Lessons of Merlin" *g*), "feels" powerful even if the words
      > > themselves are meaningless.
      >
      >Ah, but they aren't meaningless. That's just an internet legend.
      >Check out http://www.evertype.com/misc/charm.html and
      >http://www.tomstrong.org/public/misc/charm.of.making.translation.txt
      >
      >But I have to think the last translation is at least a bit off, for
      >the first word of the "charm"--"anál"--really does mean "breath".
      >
      >Crowsinging

      Since the two translations of the phrase are somewhat different, I wanted
      to run it by another group of linguists to see what they came up with :-).
      Opinions?

      Thanks!
      Baintighearna Muirghein Dhaire Faoilciarach /|\
      Dreiburgen Web Minister http://www.dreiburgen.org
      (any posts to e-mail lists do not reflect official
      opinions unless specifically stated otherwise)
    • David Reynolds
      ... Daven, with all due respect, your friend s ex-husband is selling something. The words are an attempt at Irish, not Welsh. I remember having this discussion
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 27 9:43 PM
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        On Wednesday 27 August 2003 06:35 pm, Muirghein proclaimed:
        > Since this involves Old Irish, I felt it not entirely off-topic :-).
        >
        > >To: Druid@yahoogroups.com
        > >Date: Wed, 27 Aug 2003 23:21:41 -0000
        > >Subject: [Druid] Re: another.02
        > >
        > >--- In Druid@yahoogroups.com, Morgan wrote:
        > > > That bit from Excalibur, which I'm given to understand is
        > > > basically Welsh gibberish (despite it's appearance in "21
        > > > Lessons of Merlin" *g*), "feels" powerful even if the words
        > > > themselves are meaningless.
        > >
        > >Ah, but they aren't meaningless. That's just an internet legend.
        > >Check out http://www.evertype.com/misc/charm.html and
        > >http://www.tomstrong.org/public/misc/charm.of.making.translation.txt
        > >
        > >But I have to think the last translation is at least a bit off, for
        > >the first word of the "charm"--"anál"--really does mean "breath".
        > >
        > >Crowsinging
        >
        > Since the two translations of the phrase are somewhat different, I wanted
        > to run it by another group of linguists to see what they came up with :-).

        From that same group, last year:
        -------------Forwarded Message-----------------------
        On Saturday 30 November 2002 11:09 am, Daven proclaimed:
        > Actually, I'm Scottish descent, but I like the welsh more. My wife
        > also had a 100% Welsh ex-husband, and he taught her a lot, like
        > the "charm of making" from Excalibur that Dougie Monroe stole for his
        > book is actually "Mary had a little lamb" in Welsh.

        Daven, with all due respect, your friend's ex-husband is selling something.
        The words are an attempt at Irish, not Welsh. I remember having this
        discussion years ago where we deconstructed the words, and the Welsh
        interpretation didn't make any sense.

        http://www.evertype.com/misc/charm.html

        > Daven

        David
        ---------------End Forwarded Message-----------------
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