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Tramontaines?

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  • Muirghein
    In doing some reading on celtic mythology, I found The Secret Common-Wealth by Robert Kirk. Being dated at 1692, I figured it was worth ... I Googled
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 1, 2003
      In doing some reading on "celtic" mythology, I found "The Secret
      Common-Wealth" by Robert Kirk. Being dated at 1692, I figured it was worth
      a look as it predates the Victorian stuff :-). The preface includes:

      >AN ESSAY
      >off the Nature and actions of the Subterranean (and for the most part)
      >Invisible people, heirtofor going under the names of ELVES. FAUNES. and
      >FAIRIES. or the like, among the Low-Countrey Scots, and termed
      >hubhsisgedh, caiben, lusbartan [or luspardan, a kind of fairy] & siotbsudh
      >among the Tramontaines or Scotish-Irish, as they are described by those
      >who have the Second Sight: and now, to occasione further enquiry,
      >collected and compared.

      I Googled "tramontaines," and found primarily references to this work,
      though one was annotated that "Tramontaines [Highlanders}." I also found
      references to a French weather phenomenon, a province in the writings of
      Marco Polo, and one of the screenwriters on "Jackie Chan's First Strike" ;-).

      I'm interested in the origins of this word, the language and derivation as
      used in relation to Scotland. I figure someone here ought to be able to
      help on this :-).

      Thanks!
      Baintighearna Muirghein Dhaire Faoilciarach /|\
      Dreiburgen Web Minister http://www.dreiburgen.org
      (any posts to e-mail lists do not reflect official
      opinions unless specifically stated otherwise)
    • rowen_g
      My initial reaction is that it could be related to Trimontium, the Roman fort just north of Melrose, established ca 80 CE & abandoned about 100 years later.
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 5, 2003
        My initial reaction is that it could be related to Trimontium, the
        Roman fort just north of Melrose, established ca 80 CE & abandoned
        about 100 years later. The cluster of three hills for which the fort
        was called (its largest presence being near and on the northern-most
        hill) are also called the Eildon Hills - the location where Thomas the
        Rhymer is supposed to have encountered the Queen of Faerie. (Child
        #37, iirc) A large stone now marks the place at the foot of the Hills
        where the Eildon Tree of the ballad stood until relatively recently.
        (All right, sometime in the last 150 years or so - I have a photo of
        the stone at home, but don't recall the dates just now.) Thomas of
        Erceldoune does seem to have been a historical person (14th c) who
        left some interesting prophecies. The rather unimpressive remains of
        a building of that era, known locally as the Rhymer's Tower, may be
        seen in Earlston, a few miles away.

        Rowen


        --- In albanach@yahoogroups.com, Muirghein <wolfestead@s...> wrote:
        > In doing some reading on "celtic" mythology, I found "The Secret
        > Common-Wealth" by Robert Kirk. Being dated at 1692, I figured it was
        worth
        > a look as it predates the Victorian stuff :-). The preface includes:
        >
        > >AN ESSAY
        > >off the Nature and actions of the Subterranean (and for the most
        part)
        > >Invisible people, heirtofor going under the names of ELVES. FAUNES.
        and
        > >FAIRIES. or the like, among the Low-Countrey Scots, and termed
        > >hubhsisgedh, caiben, lusbartan [or luspardan, a kind of fairy] &
        siotbsudh
        > >among the Tramontaines or Scotish-Irish, as they are described by
        those
        > >who have the Second Sight: and now, to occasione further enquiry,
        > >collected and compared.
        >
        > I Googled "tramontaines," and found primarily references to this
        work,
        > though one was annotated that "Tramontaines [Highlanders}." I also
        found
        > references to a French weather phenomenon, a province in the
        writings of
        > Marco Polo, and one of the screenwriters on "Jackie Chan's First
        Strike" ;-).
        >
        > I'm interested in the origins of this word, the language and
        derivation as
        > used in relation to Scotland. I figure someone here ought to be able
        to
        > help on this :-).
        >
        > Thanks!
        > Baintighearna Muirghein Dhaire Faoilciarach /|\
        > Dreiburgen Web Minister http://www.dreiburgen.org
        > (any posts to e-mail lists do not reflect official
        > opinions unless specifically stated otherwise)
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