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Re: [albanach] Scottish Catholicism 16th Century

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  • Sharon L. Krossa
    ... This is going to be true of most of the books dealing with the Scottish church and the Reformation. If I recall correctly, the book actually addressing
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 8, 2002
      At 8:54 AM -0400 9/8/02, Matthew A. C. Newsome wrote:
      >I have the whole set (published so far) and they are excellent. I'm
      >afraid that this will tell you more about the figure, personalities, and
      >politics of the Reformation than any actual rites and usages just prior
      >to it.

      This is going to be true of most of the books dealing with the
      Scottish church and the Reformation. If I recall correctly, the book
      actually addressing *practice* in England was somewhat of a
      revolutionary approach ;-) [One that I wish more people would take!)
      I don't have any specific books about the Scottish Reformation to
      recommend atm, but in general I would advise the general path that I
      normally recommend: start with general academic histories of
      Scotland, use their footnotes and bibliographies to find more
      specific works, etc. For this I think Lynch's more recently published
      history is going to be of the most use (especially since the
      Reformation is in his period of specialization). See

      http://www.MedievalScotland.org/scotbiblio/

      I also get the impression that this is another one of those areas
      where you have to be very careful in your sources, and seek recent
      academic histories rather than popular ones (or old ones) in order to
      avoid serious religious bias.

      I suspect that journal articles may be the works most likely to
      address the sort of daily life and belief aspect. (One journal to
      look out for in particular is the Innes Review -- Catholicism and
      Catholics in Scotland is the focus of that journal, but it is a
      respected academic journal rather than a some dubious propaganda
      machine ;-)

      >By and large, you can expect the same rites and usages in the Scottish
      >Catholic church as you will find in England and on the continent,
      >because the entire Western Church was under the same Patriarch, the
      >Bishop of Rome. Not that there will not be any peculiarities, but they
      >won't be great. But if you want to learn about the specific character
      >of the Church in Scotland, I suggest that the best way to learn this
      >would be to read about the saints that came out of Scotland.

      I'm not sure that this is really going to say very much about
      character of the Scottish church prior to the Reformation --
      especially given that the saints date to a much earlier period. In
      fact, most of them date to before Scotland came into line with the
      Roman church!

      Sharon
      --
      Sharon Krossa, krossa@...
      Medieval Scotland (including resources for names, clothing, history, & more):
      http://www.MedievalScotland.org/
    • Matthew A. C. Newsome
      ... Sure it will. Because even if the particular saint came from an earlier period than you may be interested in, his or her biography may have been written
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 8, 2002
        "Sharon L. Krossa" wrote:

        > I'm not sure that this is really going to say very much about
        > character of the Scottish church prior to the Reformation --
        > especially given that the saints date to a much earlier period. In
        > fact, most of them date to before Scotland came into line with the
        > Roman church!

        Sure it will. Because even if the particular saint came from an earlier
        period than you may be interested in, his or her biography may have been
        written at a later date, and it would have been read for centuries
        beyond that. Churches would be built and dedicated to these saints, and
        their cult would prosper and grow, and inspire many devotions. If you
        want to learn about the Church in Scotland, look at the saints that it
        produced, and look at what other people were saying about them. In my
        opinion, if you want to get a good idea of the "character" of the
        Scottish Church, this is the best route to go.

        Even if you want to learn about the state of the Church in 1500, you
        have to have as your background the history of the Church in 1400, 1300,
        1200, and so on, to even begin to make sense of it. So a good grounding
        in the historical background is a must.

        Thanks for the Innes Review reference. Do they have a web page or an
        address for more info?

        Aye,
        Eogan
      • Matthew A. C. Newsome
        ... Should have just done a web search first. A quick google search gave me this: http://english.op.org/scotland/edinburgh/innes_review/ Aye, Eogan
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 9, 2002
          I wrote:

          > Thanks for the Innes Review reference. Do they have a web page or an
          > address for more info?

          Should have just done a web search first. A quick google search gave me
          this:
          http://english.op.org/scotland/edinburgh/innes_review/

          Aye,
          Eogan
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