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Garderobe

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  • Diana Cosby
    I have a question please. Unfortunately, since I can t find much info on garderobes in my research books, I ve done some research on the net. I m still
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 20, 2002
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      I have a question please. Unfortunately, since I can't find much
      info on garderobes in my research books, I've done some research on the
      net. I'm still stuck. I thought for sure I've read of knights climbing
      up through the garderobes when laying siege to a castle. I want to use
      this tactic for my knight who is trying to rescue the heroine from the
      dungeon. Also, does anyone know when dungeons were brought down to
      below ground? My story is in Scotland, 1305 and I'm debating on whether
      to put the dungeon above ground--the highest level--or below ground.
      Would I have a choice here? Thank you for any assistance in advance.
      Diana
      --
      wulfe6@...
      http://members.cox.net/wulfe6/
      "Nothing great in the world has ever been accomplished without passion."
      G.W.F. Hegel
    • Jason Gasper
      ... Dunno much about garderobes, sorry... I suspect that anybody who was foolish enough to leave something hanging around that besieging troops could climb
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 20, 2002
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        --- Diana Cosby <wulfe6@...> wrote:
        > I have a question please. Unfortunately, since I can't find much
        > info on garderobes in my research books, I've done some research on
        > the
        > net. I'm still stuck. I thought for sure I've read of knights
        > climbing
        > up through the garderobes when laying siege to a castle. I want to
        > use
        > this tactic for my knight who is trying to rescue the heroine from
        > the
        > dungeon.

        Dunno much about garderobes, sorry... I suspect that anybody who was
        foolish enough to leave something hanging around that besieging troops
        could climb that easily deserves to have his castle overrun.

        Knights, due to the weight of full armor, even the earlier full chain
        suits, simply didn't climb much. Normal troops might climb up & open
        the gates so the knights could get in, or the Knights might follow
        through the hole made by a battering ram, but they generally weren't
        the ones climbing the scaling latters or graple ropes.

        Now if your knight in the story is not encumbered by armor and is doing
        it when the castle is not actually under siege, then it would be
        entirely a different situation...

        > Also, does anyone know when dungeons were brought down to
        > below ground? My story is in Scotland, 1305 and I'm debating on
        > whether
        > to put the dungeon above ground--the highest level--or below ground.
        > Would I have a choice here? Thank you for any assistance in advance.
        > Diana

        Depends on the prisoner. =) If the prisoner was nobility in good
        standing they would often be put in a lonely locked chamber (the modern
        equivelent is a studio appt.) under guard, while if they were of lower
        station, a prisoner of war, or other hardcase they would often end up
        in the donjon, which became our modern dungeon. These pits were
        basically caged cellers, usually without the hollywood afectation of a
        barred window to the outside.

        There's a kiddie picture book called (appropriately enough) "castles"
        that has cutout views of different castles & their arrangements. I
        think it would give you a decent understanding of the arrangement in a
        visual way that most texts can't or won't do.

        Hope that helps!

        Yours in service,

        Robert McKynnon



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      • Diana Cosby
        Jason Gasper wrote: Now if your knight in the story is not encumbered by armor and is doing it when the castle is not actually under siege, then it would be
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 20, 2002
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          Jason Gasper wrote: Now if your knight in the story is not encumbered
          by armor and is doing it when the castle is not actually under siege,
          then it would be entirely a different situation...

          ~This is the situation.

          > Depends on the prisoner. =) If the prisoner was nobility in good
          > standing they would often be put in a lonely locked chamber (the
          > modern equivelent is a studio appt.) under guard, while if they were
          > of lower station, a prisoner of war, or other hardcase they would
          > often end up in the donjon, which became our modern dungeon.

          ~The prisoner is the lord's mistress who knows where Wallace is hiding.
          I guess that makes her very important.

          > These pits were basically caged cellers, usually without the hollywood
          > afectation of a barred window to the outside.

          ~Right. I found after I posted the e Stephen Biesty's Cross-Sections
          Castle, which is an excellent reference.

          > Hope that helps!

          ~It does. Thank you very much for your time. I appreciate it!
          Diana
          --
          wulfe6@...
          http://members.cox.net/wulfe6/
          "Nothing great in the world has ever been accomplished without passion."
          G.W.F. Hegel



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