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Re: [albanach] Protective cover for a book?

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  • Matt Newsome
    ... Books used to be kept in leather covers, often with straps for carrying, called satchels or budgets. I used to have a web page bookmarked that had
    Message 1 of 8 , May 9, 2002
      At Thursday, 09 May 2002, you wrote:

      >Time/Setting:  Scotland 1304:
      >
      >    I have a book that is to be thrown into the hearth.  The exterior
      >can be damanged, but is there anyway that even by allowing the fire to
      >burn itself out, most of the interior pages are saved where they're
      >readable?
      >Diana Cosby

      Books used to be kept in leather covers, often with straps for carrying,
      called satchels or budgets. I used to have a web page bookmarked
      that had pictures and archeological data on actual medieval Irish
      book budgets, but alas, I cannot find the link!

      Very important books could even be kept in metal or wooden cases.

      Aye,
      Eogan


      Albanach.org
      Scottish History -- Highland Dress
    • Diana Cosby
      Matt Newsome wrote: Books used to be kept in leather covers, often with straps for carrying, called satchels or budgets. I used to have a web page bookmarked
      Message 2 of 8 , May 9, 2002
        Matt Newsome wrote: Books used to be kept in leather covers, often with
        straps for carrying, called satchels or budgets. I used to have a web
        page bookmarked that had pictures and archaeological data on actual
        medieval Irish book budgets, but alas, I cannot find the link! Very
        important books could even be kept in metal or wooden cases.

        ~Thank you, Eogan. This definitely helps.
        Diana
        --
        wulfe6@...
        http://members.cox.net/wulfe6/
        "Don't be afraid to give up the good to go for the great." - Kenny
        Rogers



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Rosine
        Hi Diana, It s fairly normal to bind books with leather (heavy tooled leather, at that) and not uncommon that the binding ends up looking like a satchel rather
        Message 3 of 8 , May 9, 2002
          Hi Diana,
          It's fairly normal to bind books with leather (heavy tooled leather, at
          that) and not uncommon that the binding ends up looking like a satchel
          rather than what we think of as "book", folding over the page edges and
          enclosing them. This style was particularily popular with Irish and
          Northumbrian scribes, since it traveled better (caveat: from what I've seen
          of religious books written for monks/nuns. I know nothing at all about
          secular books). So your fire would have to burn through a lot of leather
          before reaching the pages inside.
          In your projected time period, I believe that most pages were of vellum -
          again, leather. Vellum can take more damage, both by heat and water, than
          paper can. However (big however) - the inks and illuminating materials will
          be affected by both, and may sustain damage. Gold leaf, for instance, if
          it's on the near edges of a page, may melt and "glue" a page and it's facing
          page together. The inks were hand-mixed using whatever binder the
          calligrapher thought of, so some may actually be waterbased.
          But on the whole, the interior of the book should survive pretty well,
          assuming that the fire isn't raging for hours.
          (As a historical note, the Book of Kells, old as it is, has undergone
          considerable abuse - burning, burial, and I think at least one dunking. Many
          of its pages are still quite beautiful, as we all know.)

          Rosine
        • bkwyrm@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/9/02 6:58:16 AM Pacific Daylight Time, wulfe6@cox.net ... Pages are parchement, which doesn t burn as well as paper -- maybe if it fell so
          Message 4 of 8 , May 9, 2002
            In a message dated 5/9/02 6:58:16 AM Pacific Daylight Time, wulfe6@...
            writes:


            > Time/Setting: Scotland 1304:
            >
            > I have a book that is to be thrown into the hearth. The exterior
            > can be damanged, but is there anyway that even by allowing the fire to
            > burn itself out, most of the interior pages are saved where they're
            > readable?
            > Diana Cosby
            >

            Pages are parchement, which doesn't burn as well as paper -- maybe if it fell
            so the cover would take most of the heat -- down to one side, or into the
            back of the fire?

            JfG


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Diana Cosby
            bkwyrm@aol.com wrote: Pages are parchement, which doesn t burn as well as paper -- maybe if it fell so the cover would take most of the heat -- down to one
            Message 5 of 8 , May 9, 2002
              bkwyrm@... wrote: Pages are parchement, which doesn't burn as well
              as paper -- maybe if it fell so the cover would take most of the heat --
              down to one side, or into the back of the fire?

              ~Thanks, that sounds like an excellent idea.
              Diana


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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