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  • Diana Cosby
    I m trying to help someone out, but I have no idea what they re describing is called: I was hoping someone here could help me find a word. I am transcribing my
    Message 1 of 11 , May 2, 2002
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      I'm trying to help someone out, but I have no idea what they're
      describing is called:
      I was hoping someone here could help me find a word. I am
      transcribing my Great Great Grandmother's autobiography (written in
      1941) and came across an interesting reference. Speaking about her
      grandfather, she says, "The old scottish women had a superstition that
      some children were born with the gift of reading and writing and did not
      have to be taught. They had a name for it that I cannot remember, and
      said my grandfather was that kind."
      Does anyone know what name she meant, or perhaps know a good place
      to start researching it?

      ~Thanks for any help in advance.
      Diana

      --
      wulfe6@...
      http://members.cox.net/wulfe6/
      "You are never given a wish without also being given the power to make
      it true. You may have to work for it, however." - Richard Bach
    • Dblackthistle8@aol.com
      my family has always referred to a gifted child as being kenblest .........my Scots roots go back forever and it was a term freely used in our home, along
      Message 2 of 11 , May 2, 2002
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        my family has always referred to a "gifted" child as being
        "kenblest".........my Scots roots go back forever and it was a term freely
        used in our home, along with others that are very common in everyday Scots
        venacular.... "ken" is always used interchangeably for "knowledge" and I
        would just think blest is simply"blessed".....hope that
        helps.....................there was a school of thought that all children
        were born with the knowledge of the world, but that the trauma of birth and
        ensuing childhood dims that knowledge but like other gifts, some people are
        able to retain some and excel.......who knows ??? it would explain alot of
        people and things.
      • Diana Cosby
        Thank you very much for your reply. I ve forwarded it to the person seeking this information. I tried to look up kenblest, but I couldn t find it. Do you
        Message 3 of 11 , May 2, 2002
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          Thank you very much for your reply. I've forwarded it to the person
          seeking this information. I tried to look up 'kenblest,' but I couldn't
          find it. Do you have any idea where a source to learn more about this
          word would be? It's extremely fasinating. Thank you again for your
          help.
          Sincerely,
          Diana Cosby

          Dblackthistle8@... wrote: my family has always referred to a
          "gifted" child as being "kenblest".........my Scots roots go back
          forever and it was a term freely used in our home, along with others
          that are very common in everyday Scots venacular.... "ken" is always
          used interchangeably for "knowledge" and I would just think blest is
          simply "blessed".....hope that helps.....................there was a
          school of thought that all children were born with the knowledge of the
          world, but that the trauma of birth and ensuing childhood dims that
          knowledge but like other gifts, some people are able to retain some and
          excel.......who knows ??? it would explain alot of people and things.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Diana Cosby
          What would a person in the late 1290 s be called who sold their expertise in military knowledge, their lethal skills and worked for the highest bidder be
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 3, 2010
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            What would a person in the late 1290's be called who sold their
            expertise in military knowledge, their lethal skills and worked for the
            highest bidder be called? Thank you very much!
            Diana
          • Lee-Ann Johnson
            Mercenary? Effric mka Lee-Ann ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 3, 2010
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              Mercenary?

              Effric mka Lee-Ann

              On -03Feb-10, at 12:47 PM, Diana Cosby wrote:

              > What would a person in the late 1290's be called who sold their
              > expertise in military knowledge, their lethal skills and worked for the
              > highest bidder be called? Thank you very much!
              > Diana
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Diana Cosby
              ... ~:) That s it. I couldn t think of the word. Thank you SO much, Effric! Have a great day! Diana www.dianacosby.com His
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 4, 2010
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                Lee-Ann Johnson wrote:

                >Mercenary?
                >
                >Effric mka Lee-Ann
                >
                >
                ~:) That's it. I couldn't think of the word. Thank you SO much,
                Effric! Have a great day!

                Diana
                www.dianacosby.com <http://www.dianacosby.com/>
                His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
                His Woman/Duncan MacGruder - 4 star Romantic Times review - 2009
                Booksellers Best Finalist
                His Conquest - Nov 2010 / His Destiny - Nov 2011


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Diana Cosby
                I m unsure where I read it, but a while ago = a couple of years, I read that in medieval Scotland, women wore braids only after they were married. Does anyone
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 4, 2010
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                  I'm unsure where I read it, but a while ago = a couple of years, I
                  read that in medieval Scotland, women wore braids only after they were
                  married. Does anyone have a source if this is true? Also, does anyone
                  have a source where I can read what other things women wore only after
                  they were married in medieval Scotland? My sincere thanks for your time.

                  Diana
                • Lee-Ann
                  Your welcome. Wasn t sure if that was what you were looking for. :) Sent from my iPod Lee-Ann ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 4, 2010
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                    Your welcome.
                    Wasn't sure if that was what you were looking for. :)

                    Sent from my iPod

                    Lee-Ann

                    On 2010-02-04, at 10:00 AM, Diana Cosby <diana@...> wrote:

                    > Lee-Ann Johnson wrote:
                    >
                    > >Mercenary?
                    > >
                    > >Effric mka Lee-Ann
                    > >
                    > >
                    > ~:) That's it. I couldn't think of the word. Thank you SO much,
                    > Effric! Have a great day!
                    >
                    > Diana
                    > www.dianacosby.com <http://www.dianacosby.com/>
                    > His Captive/Alexander MacGruder
                    > His Woman/Duncan MacGruder - 4 star Romantic Times review - 2009
                    > Booksellers Best Finalist
                    > His Conquest - Nov 2010 / His Destiny - Nov 2011
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Diana Cosby
                    ... hard you try, you can t think of it? Yes, one of those times. Enjoy your day! Now, headed back to my mercenary. *G* Diana
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 4, 2010
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                      Lee-Ann wrote:

                      >Your welcome.
                      >Wasn't sure if that was what you were looking for. :)
                      >
                      >
                      :) It was. You know how sometimes you 'know' the word, but however
                      hard you try, you can't think of it? Yes, one of those times. Enjoy
                      your day! Now, headed back to my mercenary. *G*

                      Diana
                    • Sebhdann
                      Diana, One of the ladies of my Shire did an article on medieval hairstyles recently. I ll search it out tonight to see if it says anything on Scottish styles
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 4, 2010
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                        Diana,

                        One of the ladies of my Shire did an article on medieval hairstyles
                        recently. I'll search it out tonight to see if it says anything on Scottish
                        styles particularly. If it doesn't have anything I'll query her for other
                        reference(s) for you.

                        And as far as clothing goes, whenever anyone asks about Scottish garb, the
                        standard reply is, "Have you read Sharon Krossa's webpage?" *lol* Honestly,
                        it's a great starting place. Here's the Link: http://medievalscotland.org/

                        Then this webpage from historicgames.com had some info on clothing:
                        http://historicgames.com/Scottishstuff/scotsattire.html

                        The following info was taken from this website:
                        http://www.earlyirish.org/EarlyGaelicDress12col.pdf , page 4. The time
                        period discussed for the article is much earlier than what you write, but
                        the below resource would be useful. The Highland Scots were by and large,
                        'conservative' in their dressing, so sudden, radical changes were not usual,
                        so a resource detailing dress from previous centuries could still be useful.
                        *
                        Old Irish and Highland Dress, with Notes on That of the Isle of Man**, by
                        H.F. McClintock, Dundalgan Press, 1943
                        Well, the bad news is that this work has been out of print for quite some
                        time. Even an interlibrary loan has a hard time finding it. It may still
                        haunt some old bookshelf in your area, but good luck finding it. Now, here
                        is the good news. www.Scotpress.com has for sale on CD not only this entire
                        book, but many others as well, most of which deal with Scottish and Irish
                        history. So you may very well be able to get the sweat-drenched work of Old
                        Man McClintock for yourself. It is worth every penny. McClintock is the
                        pioneer in this field, charged with determining historic Irish dress for the
                        Irish government in the �forties. Before him was P.W. Joyce, author of a
                        text called A Social History of Ancient Ireland, which was based on the
                        Victorian work of Professor O�Curry, Manners and Customs of the Ancient
                        Irish, published in 1873. O�Curry was a sound scholar but he proposed
                        translations that simply didn�t pan out when investigated, especially
                        concerning fashion, so McClintock started over. He gives the reader
                        sculpture and shrines, art and literature, sacred texts and even Brehon Law
                        to back his conclusions. Though some of what McClintock wrote is now a
                        little dated, his writing remains the foremost resource for this topic.

                        Neither of these works is definitive. Discoveries and more detailed
                        understandings of daily life and dress are coming to light every day.
                        However, these books form a strong foundation for any scholar or enthusiast
                        to begin their dabblings and should be sought with haste.*

                        Then of course, there's always the Yahoo Group, SCA Garb. A very
                        knowledgeable bunch and very willing to answer questions posed.

                        Hope this helps!

                        --
                        Sl�n!

                        Sebhdann ingen Cinaedha
                        Shire of Wyewood, An Tir
                        Clannet, Clan Carn

                        *mka Sue V.*

                        Move Your Feet to a Marching Drum
                        We'll win the war and pay the toll,
                        We'll Fight as One in Heart and Soul
                        --'The March of Cambreadth'--Heather Alexander


                        On Thu, Feb 4, 2010 at 6:01 AM, Diana Cosby <diana@...> wrote:

                        >
                        >
                        > I'm unsure where I read it, but a while ago = a couple of years, I
                        > read that in medieval Scotland, women wore braids only after they were
                        > married. Does anyone have a source if this is true? Also, does anyone
                        > have a source where I can read what other things women wore only after
                        > they were married in medieval Scotland? My sincere thanks for your time.
                        >
                        > Diana
                        >
                        >


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Sebhdann
                        Diana, Also the term *Gallowglass* might be appropriate. Here s a Wikipedia article on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallowglass Hope this helps! --
                        Message 11 of 11 , Feb 4, 2010
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                          Diana,

                          Also the term *Gallowglass* might be appropriate. Here's a Wikipedia
                          article on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallowglass

                          Hope this helps!
                          --
                          Sl�n!

                          Sebhdann ingen Cinaedha
                          Shire of Wyewood, An Tir
                          Clannet, Clan Carn

                          *mka Sue V.*

                          Move Your Feet to a Marching Drum
                          We'll win the war and pay the toll,
                          We'll Fight as One in Heart and Soul
                          --'The March of Cambreadth'--Heather Alexander


                          On Wed, Feb 3, 2010 at 8:47 AM, Diana Cosby <diana@...> wrote:

                          >
                          >
                          > What would a person in the late 1290's be called who sold their
                          > expertise in military knowledge, their lethal skills and worked for the
                          > highest bidder be called? Thank you very much!
                          > Diana
                          >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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