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[alanmoore] Re: OT:Shameless Plug

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  • PAMELA BOUCHER
    Hi All! Issue # 13 of the Good Guys and Gals of the Golden Age is now online @ the URL listed at the bottom of this page.Also this issue gives you the
    Message 1 of 15 , Mar 2 2:25 PM
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      Hi All!
      Issue # 13 of the Good Guys and Gals of the Golden Age is now online @
      the URL listed at the bottom of this page.Also this issue gives you the
      opportunity to own the first 12 issues on CD ROM now.Go and have
      fun.Enjoy!

      R & D @ PR Publications
      Good Guys and Gals of the Golden Age
      http://goldenage.cjb.net
    • Clyde E Rittenhouse
      On the final (rather moving) page of TS #7, Tom reflects back on the 20th century with all it s wonders and horrors . He goes through a short list of notable
      Message 2 of 15 , Mar 2 3:40 PM
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        On the final (rather moving) page of TS #7, Tom reflects back on the
        20th century "with all it's wonders and horrors". He goes through a short
        list of notable people and events (Hitler, Hiroshima, etc.) ending with
        "Elger". OK, I know I really should know this, but who was Elger?
      • Ian McLean
        ... I had to wait until I read it to be sure, because you spelled the name incorrectly :) It s Elgar, a British composer - perhaps best known for Pictures at
        Message 3 of 15 , Mar 5 4:12 PM
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          > On the final (rather moving) page of TS #7, Tom reflects back on the
          > 20th century "with all it's wonders and horrors". He goes through a short
          > list of notable people and events (Hitler, Hiroshima, etc.) ending with
          > "Elger". OK, I know I really should know this, but who was Elger?

          I had to wait until I read it to be sure, because you spelled the name
          incorrectly :) It's Elgar, a British composer - perhaps best known for
          "Pictures at an Exhibition", a piano piece which sounded much better when
          arranged for more instruments by Mussorgsky.

          If you want to know more, apparently there's a site at
          http://www.elgar.org/ run by the Elgar Society.


          Andrew
        • RMorris306@aol.com
          In a message dated 3/5/00 8:11:34 PM, ianmcl@melbpc.org.au writes: On the final (rather moving) page of TS #7, Tom reflects back on the ... I had to
          Message 4 of 15 , Mar 5 5:26 PM
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            In a message dated 3/5/00 8:11:34 PM, ianmcl@... writes:

            << > On the final (rather moving) page of TS #7, Tom reflects back on the
            > 20th century "with all it's wonders and horrors". He goes through a short
            > list of notable people and events (Hitler, Hiroshima, etc.) ending with
            > "Elger". OK, I know I really should know this, but who was Elger?

            I had to wait until I read it to be sure, because you spelled the name
            incorrectly :) It's Elgar, a British composer - perhaps best known for
            "Pictures at an Exhibition", a piano piece which sounded much better when
            arranged for more instruments by Mussorgsky.

            If you want to know more, apparently there's a site at
            http://www.elgar.org/ run by the Elgar Society.
            >>

            Thanks! I was pretty sure that's who Moore meant. Although I'd say an
            even more famous work by Elgar is "Pomp and Circumstance #1," which almost
            everyone would recognize by tune if not by name. It's the march almost
            invariably played at high school, and sometimes college, graduations.


            Rich
          • Peter Hudson
            This has probably been answered earlier in the series and I just forgot, but what do we know about the Strongmen of America , especially Fortnum and Mason.
            Message 5 of 15 , Mar 5 5:29 PM
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              This has probably been answered earlier in the series and I just
              forgot, but what do we know about the "Strongmen of America",
              especially Fortnum and Mason. I'm intrigued by their difficulty in
              deciding who is who. Do their names refer to anything specific which
              might enlighten us and/or was this explained earlier?
            • Ian McLean
              ... I *think* one of them is the young boy from Tom Strong #1 and the ABC preview - but I haven t gone back to check, so I could well be wrong. Andrew
              Message 6 of 15 , Mar 5 7:08 PM
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                >This has probably been answered earlier in the series and I just
                >forgot, but what do we know about the "Strongmen of America",
                >especially Fortnum and Mason. I'm intrigued by their difficulty in
                >deciding who is who. Do their names refer to anything specific which
                >might enlighten us and/or was this explained earlier?

                I *think* one of them is the young boy from Tom Strong #1 and the ABC
                preview - but I haven't gone back to check, so I could well be wrong.


                Andrew
              • Robert Borski
                ... the ... short ... Just a minor quibble point. Elgar did _not_ write Pictures at an Exhibition. Modest Musorgsky did; while the orchestration you refer to
                Message 7 of 15 , Mar 5 10:49 PM
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                  > > On the final (rather moving) page of TS #7, Tom reflects back on
                  the
                  > > 20th century "with all it's wonders and horrors". He goes through a
                  short
                  > > list of notable people and events (Hitler, Hiroshima, etc.) ending with

                  > > "Elger". OK, I know I really should know this, but who was Elger?
                  >
                  > I had to wait until I read it to be sure, because you spelled the name
                  > incorrectly :) It's Elgar, a British composer - perhaps best known for
                  > "Pictures at an Exhibition", a piano piece which sounded much better when
                  > arranged for more instruments by Mussorgsky.
                  >

                  Just a minor quibble point. Elgar did _not_ write "Pictures at an
                  Exhibition." Modest Musorgsky did; while the orchestration you refer to was
                  done by Maurice Ravel.

                  Robert
                • Peter Hudson
                  ... To answer part of my own question I did some searching on Fortnum & Mason and discovered that they are an upper class british dealer in teas and wine and
                  Message 8 of 15 , Mar 5 11:10 PM
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                    At 2:08 PM +1100 3/6/00, Ian McLean wrote:
                    > >This has probably been answered earlier in the series and I just
                    >>forgot, but what do we know about the "Strongmen of America",
                    >>especially Fortnum and Mason. I'm intrigued by their difficulty in
                    >>deciding who is who. Do their names refer to anything specific which
                    > >might enlighten us and/or was this explained earlier?


                    To answer part of my own question I did some searching on Fortnum &
                    Mason and discovered that they are an upper class british dealer in
                    teas and wine and food gifts. The joke still escapes me though.
                  • Peter Hudson
                    ... In that case, we are back to the original question: Who is Elgar?
                    Message 9 of 15 , Mar 5 11:11 PM
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                      At 12:49 AM -0600 3/6/00, Robert Borski wrote:
                      > > > On the final (rather moving) page of TS #7, Tom reflects back on
                      >the
                      >> > 20th century "with all it's wonders and horrors". He goes through a
                      >short
                      >> > list of notable people and events (Hitler, Hiroshima, etc.) ending with
                      >
                      >> > "Elger". OK, I know I really should know this, but who was Elger?
                      >>
                      >> I had to wait until I read it to be sure, because you spelled the name
                      >> incorrectly :) It's Elgar, a British composer - perhaps best known for
                      >> "Pictures at an Exhibition", a piano piece which sounded much better when
                      >> arranged for more instruments by Mussorgsky.
                      >>
                      >
                      >Just a minor quibble point. Elgar did _not_ write "Pictures at an
                      >Exhibition." Modest Musorgsky did; while the orchestration you refer to was
                      >done by Maurice Ravel.
                      >
                      >Robert

                      In that case, we are back to the original question: Who is Elgar?
                    • Michael Thomsen
                      ... It s Pomp & Circumstance that s his most fameous piece. He was a very late romantic - he did some very pompous, spiritful and romantic music while others
                      Message 10 of 15 , Mar 6 1:51 AM
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                        >>Just a minor quibble point. Elgar did _not_ write "Pictures at an
                        >>Exhibition." Modest Musorgsky did; while the orchestration you refer to
                        >>was
                        >>done by Maurice Ravel.
                        >>
                        >>Robert
                        >
                        >In that case, we are back to the original question: Who is Elgar?
                        >

                        It's "Pomp & Circumstance" that's his most fameous piece. He was a very late
                        romantic - he did some very pompous, spiritful and romantic music while
                        others were busy inventing modernism. It's not unusual for
                        "anti-establishment" british people to make fun of him. Theres a pretty good
                        Elgar joke in Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaimans "Good Omens". Goes something
                        like this: Heaven must be a pretty boring place since the devil has all the
                        best tunes and Heaven only has Elgar (uhm they told it in a funnier way in
                        the book). As far as I remember Pomp & Circumstance is also used to ironic
                        effect in "A Clockwork Orange".

                        Michael
                        ______________________________________________________
                      • Jeff Bar
                        I think they re the two geeks who brought the Modular Man back to life in an earlier issue. Not sure about the significance of the names though. Jeff ... This
                        Message 11 of 15 , Mar 6 5:40 AM
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                          I think they're the two geeks who brought the Modular Man back to life in an earlier issue. Not sure about the significance of the names though.

                          Jeff

                          >>> Peter Hudson <hudson99@...> 03/05/00 07:29PM >>>
                          This has probably been answered earlier in the series and I just
                          forgot, but what do we know about the "Strongmen of America",
                          especially Fortnum and Mason. I'm intrigued by their difficulty in
                          deciding who is who. Do their names refer to anything specific which
                          might enlighten us and/or was this explained earlier?

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                        • CTowner1@aol.com
                          ... Fortnum & Mason is the name, as was sort of alluded to in an earlier post, of one of the most famous stores in London- specializing in gourmet foods (its
                          Message 12 of 15 , Mar 6 6:05 AM
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                            In a message dated Mon, 6 Mar 2000 8:58:24 AM Eastern Standard Time, "Jeff Bar" <Jdbar@...> writes:

                            > I think they're the two geeks who brought the Modular Man back to life in an earlier issue. Not sure about the significance of the names though.
                            >
                            > Jeff
                            >
                            > >>> Peter Hudson <hudson99@...> 03/05/00 07:29PM >>>
                            > This has probably been answered earlier in the series and I just
                            > forgot, but what do we know about the "Strongmen of America",
                            > especially Fortnum and Mason. I'm intrigued by their difficulty in
                            > deciding who is who. Do their names refer to anything specific which
                            > might enlighten us and/or was this explained earlier?

                            "Fortnum & Mason" is the name, as was sort of alluded to in an earlier post, of one of the most famous stores in London- specializing in gourmet foods (its an excellent store!). It's sort of like if the 2 fans were names "Sears" & "Roebuck" (although, maybe that's a little dated).

                            e
                            L nny
                          • Xfilesphil@aol.com
                            ... You re correct, that s Timmy Turbo from TS#1, all grown up. His trademark Holy Socks! is a dead giveaway. Regards, Gonz
                            Message 13 of 15 , Mar 6 7:05 AM
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                              On 3/6/2000 11:08 AM, Andrew wrote:

                              >I *think* one of them is the young boy from Tom Strong #1 and the ABC
                              >preview - but I haven't gone back to check, so I could well be wrong.

                              You're correct, that's Timmy Turbo from TS#1, all grown up. His
                              trademark "Holy Socks!" is a dead giveaway.

                              Regards,
                              Gonz
                            • Ian McLean
                              ... That s very strange - I borrowed it recently and could swear it mentioned Elgar as the composer... maybe I ve just made that association because Elgar is a
                              Message 14 of 15 , Mar 6 3:29 PM
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                                >Just a minor quibble point. Elgar did _not_ write "Pictures at an
                                >Exhibition." Modest Musorgsky did; while the orchestration you refer to was
                                >done by Maurice Ravel.

                                That's very strange - I borrowed it recently and could swear it mentioned
                                Elgar as the composer... maybe I've just made that association because
                                Elgar is a typically English composer, and the theme music for the English
                                political comedy "The New Statesmen" was "Pictures at an Exhibition".

                                Thanks for correcting my muddle.


                                Andrew
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