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[alanmoore] Re: R.I.P. Gil Kane

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  • Daniel Smith
    ... The Judgement Day homage is the only version I ve seen. Where was the original version published? Daniel
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 31, 2000
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      > Very sad. Just tonight I was just thinking about "His Name is Kane", both
      > the original version and the Moore homage in Judgement Day (with Awesome
      > Andy!).

      The Judgement Day homage is the only version I've seen.

      Where was the original version published?

      Daniel
    • Captain Average
      ... From: To: Sent: Monday, January 31, 2000 5:44 PM Subject: [alanmoore] Re: R.I.P. Gil Kane ... from ... Gil Kane
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 1, 2000
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <Emerpus01@...>
        To: <alanmoore@egroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, January 31, 2000 5:44 PM
        Subject: [alanmoore] Re: R.I.P. Gil Kane


        > Very sad. Just tonight I was just thinking about "His Name is Kane", both
        > the original version and the Moore homage in Judgement Day (with Awesome
        > Andy!). I got copies of the two issue french reprint of Judgement Day
        from
        > Semic while I was at the Angouleme comics festival this past week. In my
        > opinion Kanes' Judgement Day and his western flashback sequence in Supreme
        > are the best work that Awesome has published.

        Gil Kane was one of those rare artists who could tell the story without the
        words. His unique style influenced almost as many artists as Will Eisner
        and Jack Kirby. The "Gil Kane Girl" is probably one of the most imitated in
        comics and his layouts for everything from hard-boiled detective, to
        superhero, to romance were always impeccable. I don't know which I
        preferred more - his inks of his own pencils, or his work in collaboration
        with artists like Murphy Anderson.

        Kane has been a personal favourite of mine since the late 50s. For some
        reason, I feel like crying...

        Captain Average

        P.S. On a related note: one of my oldest friends has a sister who looks
        like a 6' brunette version of Kane's Karen Page from his Daredevil days.
        She has the eyes (spaced just a hair too widely apart), the button nose;
        the full lips that go dead flat when angry and the slim, yet
        well-proportioned body. She is the only woman I've ever seen who actually
        looks like the "Gil Kane Girl".
      • CTowner1@aol.com
        ... I agree totally. Although it always seemed to me that he never quite got the accolades he deserved, especially in the recent years of superstar artists
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 2, 2000
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          In a message dated Tue, 1 Feb 2000 4:49:23 PM Eastern Standard Time, "Captain Average" <captain.average@...> writes:

          > Gil Kane was one of those rare artists who could tell > the story without the words. His unique style
          > influenced almost as many artists as Will Eisner
          > and Jack Kirby.

          I agree totally. Although it always seemed to me that he never quite got the accolades he deserved, especially in the recent years of "superstar" artists who have only a passing knowledge of human anatomy and movement, Gil Kane's dynamic style electrified me during my formative comic book years. He combined the fluidity of Steve Ditko with the power of Jack Kirby in a style that was very much his own (including even those quirky "under the nose show those nostrils shots!!" ;^)

          Two stunning examples that stick out in my memory are (1) Amazing Spiderman 89-90 (which came out during my first year of collecting comic books as a 7 year old)where he drew the ULTIMATE Spidey-Doc Ock fight - probably about 10-15 of the most balletic, punching, dodging, jumping, twisting, crunching, exciting, and all-around movement pages in the history of comics!!

          and(believe it or not) (2) What If? 3 (or was it 2?) where he drew a beautiful Iron Man-styled Avengers battling Namor and the Hulk with gorgeous Klaus Janson inks (someone with whom I wish he had done more work - Klaus's sush thick lines and shading gave Gil's art a real solid heft to it!). There's this one full page length cropped shot of Namor punching one of the Avengers out of the ocean that is still sharp in my memory!!

          Rest easy Gil- you deserve it after all that action!

          e
          L nny
        • Ian McLean
          While we re praising Gil Kane s many achievements, I d like to mention a recent title that doesn t seem to have made much of an impact - the Prestige Format
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 2, 2000
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            While we're praising Gil Kane's many achievements, I'd like to mention a
            recent title that doesn't seem to have made much of an impact - the
            Prestige Format Superman: Distant Fires. Gil plotted and drew this story,
            and was complemented by Kevin Nowlan on inks and Howard Chaykin on script.
            A story about a world in which all of humanity had been wiped out except
            the super-heroes, who no longer had any powers, it has the mythic feel of a
            Twilight of the Gods - which makes it a good companion to his adaptation of
            Wagner's Ring Cycle.


            Andrew
          • Daniel Smith
            ... I, for one, declined to mention Distant Fires out of respect for the deceased. I still regret paying for that turkey... ... Daniel
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 3, 2000
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              > While we're praising Gil Kane's many achievements, I'd like to mention a
              > recent title that doesn't seem to have made much of an impact - the
              > Prestige Format Superman: Distant Fires. Gil plotted and drew this story,
              > and was complemented by Kevin Nowlan on inks and Howard Chaykin on script.

              I, for one, declined to mention Distant Fires out of respect
              for the deceased. I still regret paying for that turkey...

              > Andrew

              Daniel
            • Ian McLean
              ... Ah well - I guess since we don t all agree on Moore s work, we can hardly be expected to agree on Gil Kane s work. I liked it anyway, and while not as good
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 3, 2000
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                >> While we're praising Gil Kane's many achievements, I'd like to mention a
                >> recent title that doesn't seem to have made much of an impact - the
                >> Prestige Format Superman: Distant Fires. Gil plotted and drew this story,
                >> and was complemented by Kevin Nowlan on inks and Howard Chaykin on script.
                >
                >I, for one, declined to mention Distant Fires out of respect
                >for the deceased. I still regret paying for that turkey...

                Ah well - I guess since we don't all agree on Moore's work, we can hardly
                be expected to agree on Gil Kane's work. I liked it anyway, and while not
                as good as, say, Judgement Day: Aftermath <g>, I think it was much better
                than Kingdom Come, the only title I've ever heard it compared with
                (unfavorably).


                Andrew
              • RMorris306@aol.com
                ... Oh, I had no trouble with Gil Kane s art on Distant Fires. It was very nicely done, as always. It was the story that was the real turkey...I ve very
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 4, 2000
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                  In a message dated Fri, 4 Feb 2000 12:16:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, Ian McLean <ianmcl@...> writes:

                  > >> While we're praising Gil Kane's many achievements, I'd like to mention a
                  > >> recent title that doesn't seem to have made much of an impact - the
                  > >> Prestige Format Superman: Distant Fires. Gil plotted and drew this story,
                  > >> and was complemented by Kevin Nowlan on inks and Howard Chaykin on script.
                  > >
                  > >I, for one, declined to mention Distant Fires out of respect
                  > >for the deceased. I still regret paying for that turkey...
                  >
                  > Ah well - I guess since we don't all agree on Moore's work, we can hardly
                  > be expected to agree on Gil Kane's work. I liked it anyway, and while not
                  > as good as, say, Judgement Day: Aftermath <g>, I think it was much better
                  > than Kingdom Come, the only title I've ever heard it compared with
                  > (unfavorably).
                  >
                  >
                  > Andrew
                  >
                  >

                  Oh, I had no trouble with Gil Kane's art on "Distant Fires." It was very nicely done, as always. It was the story that was the real turkey...I've very rarely like Howard Chaykin's "take" on super-heroes, a genre he admits he doesn't care for. And this had all the worst cliches of the dystopian future, even Superman and Wonder Woman getting together (something Alan Moore rightly said was "too predictable."). KINGDOM COME did it well, but I'm tired of every second-rate writer remotely involved with DC doing "takes" on a Clark/Diana relationship, DESPITE Clark's marriage...


                  Rich
                • Ian McLean
                  ... very nicely done, as always. It was the story that was the real turkey...I ve very rarely like Howard Chaykin s take on super-heroes, a genre he admits
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 6, 2000
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                    > Oh, I had no trouble with Gil Kane's art on "Distant Fires." It was
                    very nicely done, as always. It was the story that was the real
                    turkey...I've very rarely like Howard Chaykin's "take" on super-heroes, a
                    genre he admits he doesn't care for. And this had all the worst cliches of
                    the dystopian future, even Superman and Wonder Woman getting together
                    (something Alan Moore rightly said was "too predictable."). KINGDOM COME
                    did it well, but I'm tired of every second-rate writer remotely involved
                    with DC doing "takes" on a Clark/Diana relationship, DESPITE Clark's
                    marriage...

                    Just to clarify: while Howard Chaykin scripted, he was *not* responsible
                    for the story. That was Gil Kane's work - he basically brought Howard in to
                    do the dialogue. This isn't clear from the packaging, as DC forgot to
                    credit the plot to Gil.

                    And I don't see the problem with a Clark/Diana relationship occurring in an
                    Elseworlds where Lois Lane is dead - even if it's predictable, there isn't
                    really anybody else left in the story that Superman would even consider.
                    Apart from which, it's also a significant plot point in the development of
                    this particular story.


                    Andrew


                    Andrew
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