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Re: [alanmoore] Re: The first Alan Moore comic you read

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  • Djojoweir@aol.com
    I had seen some of his Sounds work as it came out, but wasn t impressed. Next would be the start of his Captain Britain work. I Missed completely the Dr Who
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 1, 2006
      I had seen some of his Sounds work as it came out, but wasn't impressed.
       
      Next would be the start of his Captain Britain work. I Missed completely the Dr Who stuff until the reprints in Daredevils. Then came V and Marvelman. By the time of Daredevils, I had the pleasure to work in editor Bernie Jaye's office for a summer and see the Moore scripts come in and the Davis original artwork. Wish I'd had the sense to photocopy the scripts.
       
      I subbed an episode of Captain Britain and picked up on a spelling error. Such was the respect Bernie had for him, she insisted that he be consulted before I had a lettering correction made. I have to admit a certain nervousness at speaking to him even then. Does it sound too OTT to say that there was a feeling then that this man was something different, something special? The intellect and attitude he brought with him.
       
      Then he seemed to be everywhere: 2000 AD, Daredevils, Warrior, championing Eddie Campbell and the Fast Fiction crowd, fanzine strips (Captain Airstrip One etc.).
       
      Soon we had to share him with the Americans. I remember the expectancy and excitement awaiting that first Swamp Thing...
       
      I know this was supposed to be"The first Alan Moore comic you read," but I got carried away. Sorry.
       
       
      Dave
    • chinaboatman
      My `Alan Moore debut is similar to others told here, although perhaps later. Technically, the first Moore comics I would have read would be the black and
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 1, 2006
        My `Alan Moore debut' is similar to others told here, although
        perhaps later. Technically, the first Moore comics I would have read
        would be the black and white Titan books TPB `The Man of Tomorrow'
        reprinting his Superman stories, which I read and treasured as a
        child. Back then I paid no attention to the credits (I knew two
        comics creators names: Geoff Senior and Simon Furman, who created
        the Transformers UK strip! I grew up in the 80s) so I had no
        conception that the stories were all by one author or that authors
        name but I just knew there was something special about them. They
        were clearly different (ie better) than `normal' comics (although
        the Superman writer at that time would have been John Byrne so it
        didn't take Alan Moore to do something better). That was probably my
        single favourite comic at that time, a precursor of my future
        obsession!

        Strangely for a young British comics reader at that time, I didn't
        read 2000AD so I didn't see his work there and although my dad
        brought a lot of British and American comics (he has a large
        collection) and had much of Warrior and the Marvel UK stuff, for
        some reason I don't recall reading it. So Moore passed me by until
        about 7 years ago, at which time I had grown tired and
        dissillusioned with comics as I couldn't find any intelligent, adult
        comics that satisfied me. I'd seen many indies but they didn't do
        much for me, they didn't seem in line with my sensibilities (with
        one or two exceptions like Pete Bagge and the Hernandez bros), they
        weren't what I wanted to see and the maistream `adult' stuff I'd
        seen, like Vertigo, was usually anything but `For Mature Readers'.

        Then one day, to ease boredom, I was rifling through my dad's
        collection (this'll sound strange but I get a lot of enjoyment
        simply looking at the covers of comics) and I pulled out the 10
        issue DC V for Vendetta (this was about 1999) and the Adventures of
        Luther Arkwright TPB. Both suddenly gripped me as being something
        different to the usual fare (I know, this is starting to sound a
        little silly, but it's what happened!) and I was compelled to begin
        reading them, starting with V, that very night, despite it being
        about 2 AM. I was absolutely blown away of course. In Michael Peters
        words `It was clear Moore was smarter and more clever than most
        comics writers.' Both books were exactly what I'd wanted to see:
        intelligent, literary comics that weren't written for the purpose of
        inflicting the authors' neuroses and idiosyncrasies onto its
        readers. I remained very excited about both books for weeks
        (particularly V) and next time I went into Another World (large Sci –
        Fi retail chain, in Britain; I don't often go into comics shops as
        I dislike the ambience) I picked up Watchmen, which of course I'd
        heard about but had assumed to be in the mould of Vertigo and most
        likely grossly overrated. Well, it hit me in the same way V had and
        that was probably the start of my obsession, doctor. A couple of
        weeks later it was From Hell (the collected edition was probably new
        then; I don't know), 3 in a row was no fluke and it was obvious that
        Moore was a special one, in the words of Jose Mourinho.

        As an adjunct to this already long and boring story, very soon after
        first reading V and perhaps Watchmen and From Hell (I'm not exactly
        sure) I had the urge to pull out and read the Man of Tomorrow TPB
        again, which I hadn't read for years. Of course, I was delighted to
        find that my former childhood favourite was actually written by my
        new obsession! Suddenly, its uniquness made sense…

        Since then, I've hunted down the large majority of Moore material
        and continue to be fascinated by it, finding that Moore has so many
        different talents. Just when I occasionaly suspect I've overrated
        him, I read (or hear, as has sometimes been the case) something new
        (to me) that gives me the same feeling I had reading V that first
        time.

        Apologies for getting 'carried away' with this tedious tale.
      • chinaboatman
        No need to apologise. I enjoyed reading it. ... impressed. ... completely the ... Marvelman. By ... Bernie Jaye s ... Davis original ... error. ... consulted
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 1, 2006
          No need to apologise. I enjoyed reading it.


          --- In alanmoore@yahoogroups.com, Djojoweir@... wrote:
          >
          >
          > I had seen some of his Sounds work as it came out, but wasn't
          impressed.
          >
          > Next would be the start of his Captain Britain work. I Missed
          completely the
          > Dr Who stuff until the reprints in Daredevils. Then came V and
          Marvelman. By
          > the time of Daredevils, I had the pleasure to work in editor
          Bernie Jaye's
          > office for a summer and see the Moore scripts come in and the
          Davis original
          > artwork. Wish I'd had the sense to photocopy the scripts.
          >
          > I subbed an episode of Captain Britain and picked up on a spelling
          error.
          > Such was the respect Bernie had for him, she insisted that he be
          consulted
          > before I had a lettering correction made. I have to admit a
          certain nervousness
          > at speaking to him even then. Does it sound too OTT to say that
          there was a
          > feeling then that this man was something different, something
          special? The
          > intellect and attitude he brought with him.
          >
          > Then he seemed to be everywhere: 2000 AD, Daredevils, Warrior,
          championing
          > Eddie Campbell and the Fast Fiction crowd, fanzine strips (Captain
          Airstrip One
          > etc.).
          >
          > Soon we had to share him with the Americans. I remember the
          expectancy and
          > excitement awaiting that first Swamp Thing...
          >
          > I know this was supposed to be"The first Alan Moore comic you
          read," but I
          > got carried away. Sorry.
          >
          >
          > Dave
          >
        • jaefake
          ... I don t really remember the very first Alan Moore comic I read. But the one that had the most impact on me was LOEG. I read watchman after that, and have
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 3, 2006
            > What was your first Alan Moore comic?

            I don't really remember the very first Alan Moore comic I read. But
            the one that had the most impact on me was LOEG. I read watchman after
            that, and have been reading and enjoying his work ever since( not
            including deathblow: byblows or the killing joke). BTW this Alan Moore
            yahoo group kicks ass. Great work guys.
          • ctowner1@gmail.com
            ... hmmm....Well..the first series was Swamp Thing, which I started around 23 or so (the first issue of th Etrigon/Demon storyline?). I LOVED it and quickly
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 3, 2006
              On 8/30/06, soxborn <soxborn@...> wrote:
              >
              > What was your first Alan Moore comic?>>

              hmmm....Well..the first series was Swamp Thing, which I started around
              23 or so (the first issue of th Etrigon/Demon storyline?). I LOVED it
              and quickly got all the back issues (thankfully before the prices
              zoomed up!). If Alan's DC Presents Supes teamups predate those Swamp
              Thing's, then those might be my first issues. Although, not being up
              on all the publication dates, perhaps I ran across something earlier.

              But Swamp Thing, that's what won me over as a big time Alan fan for life!

              e
              L nny
            • George Xydas
              ... around ... It was Swamp Thing for me as well. In late 1985, after visiting my Nan in North London I stopped off on the way home at Kings Cross to pick up
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 4, 2006
                --- In alanmoore@yahoogroups.com, ctowner1@... wrote:
                >
                > On 8/30/06, soxborn <soxborn@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > What was your first Alan Moore comic?>>
                >
                > hmmm....Well..the first series was Swamp Thing, which I started
                around
                > 23 or so (the first issue of th Etrigon/Demon storyline?). <snip>>
                > e
                > L nny

                It was Swamp Thing for me as well. In late 1985, after visiting my Nan
                in North London I stopped off on the way home at Kings Cross to pick
                up some comics. This is back the days when US comics were distributed
                in newsagents across the UK, albeit some months after their US (and
                comic shop import) release.

                I distinctly recall picking up two comics that day; one being the
                double-sized Hulk 300, the other Swamp Thing 39 - the second part of
                the underwater vampire story. You can imagine the qualitative gulf
                between the two comics, and still to this day I can see that "Oh Mom!"
                panel in my mind's eye.

                Now I think of it, it's likely that I actually saw Alan Moore before I
                read any of his comics. I believe he was a guest at UKCAC85 – I
                remember a white suit - which was in early September.

                George
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