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Re: What is a Ling?

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  • David W. Dorsey
    Elizabeth, Thanks for your response. My first thought was that it might have been a crossed pair of tree limbs that enabled a log to rest in the V for
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 23, 1999
      Elizabeth,

      Thanks for your response.

      My first thought was that it might have been a crossed pair of tree "limbs"
      that enabled a log to rest in the "V" for cutting. I have seen those but
      have no idea what they are called!

      Maybe after the holidays someone will come up with an answer.

      Best wishes,
      David
      ddorsey@...

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    • Dean Costello
      ... heather. But I m not sure that is what you are looking for. I ve been thinking about this. Maybe a ling , in this case, is like a trellis; some kind of
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 24, 1999
        >Webster's New Universal Unabridged Dictionary defines "ling" as "common
        heather." But I'm not sure that is what you are looking for.

        I've been thinking about this. Maybe a "ling", in this case, is like a
        trellis; some kind of support for ivy, roses, or lilacs?

        -
        As an adolescent I aspired to lasting fame, I craved factual
        certainty, and I thirsted for a meaningful vision of human
        life--so I became a scientist. This is like becoming an
        archbishop so you can meet girls.
        -M. Cartmill

        Dean Costello
        costello@...
      • mike@adtechservices.com
        David- Webster s New Universal Unabridged Dictionary defines ling as common heather. But I m not sure that is what you are looking for. -Mike
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 24, 1999
          David-

          Webster's New Universal Unabridged Dictionary defines "ling" as "common heather." But I'm not sure that is what you are looking for.

          -Mike
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