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Re: Fwd: Moonlit Road

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  • PCI Tuscaloosa
    ... From: Sent: Friday, October 22, 1999 6:27 PM Subject: [alabamahistory] Fwd: Moonlit Road
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 27, 1999
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <errors-23199-479-panam=dbtech.net@onelist.com>
      Sent: Friday, October 22, 1999 6:27 PM
      Subject: [alabamahistory] Fwd: Moonlit Road


      > From: (no from line)
      >
      > This may be of interest to some subscribers...nice site...aj wright
      >
      >
      > THE MOONLIT ROAD NEWSLETTER
      > October 1999
      > ---------------------------
      >
      > Happy Halloween!
      >
      > It's that time of year again. Actually, I guess you could say every
      > day is Halloween for the staff of The Moonlit Road. We hope you have
      > a safe and creepy weekend.
      >
      > This year, we have a very special story we hope you will enjoy. Dare
      > we say it's our masterpiece? (cue chest thumping sound effects)
      >
      > This story takes a bit more concentration and imagination, so it may
      > not be suitable for the very young ones. But we think you'll find
      > your listening experience to be very rewarding.
      >
      > Once again, our stories can be heard this month on public radio
      > stations throughout Georgia. We are hoping to be picked up by other
      > stations across the country. When we have a schedule available, we'll
      > send it to you. If you live within one of the coverage areas, we hope
      > you will tune us in, and support the stations that support us.
      >
      > All the Best,
      >
      > Craig Dominey Producer,
      > The Moonlit Road
      > cdominey@...
      >
      >
      > CONTENTS:
      >
      > I. What's New on The Moonlit Road
      > II. The Moonlit Road Storytellers - Live
      > III. The Moonlit Road - On the Radio
      > IV. Feature Story
      > V. A Final Thought
      >
      >
      > I. WHAT'S NEW ON THE MOONLIT ROAD
      >
      > - For Halloween, we are proud to present the story that our site was
      > named after: the classic ghost story by Ambrose Bierce, "The Moonlit
      > Road." It's an eerie story of murder and haunted souls in Tennessee,
      > and is one of the most beloved ghost stories in modern literature.
      >
      > It is rare to hear an audio version of this story, and we've pulled
      > out all the stops. Along with one of our favorite storytellers, John
      > Gentile, "The Moonlit Road" also features two actors from the Atlanta
      > Radio Theatre Company -Thomas Fuller and Trudy Leonard. It also
      > features an eerie music score by composer Michael Thomas.
      >
      > "The Moonlit Road" is 27 minutes long, and can be heard in one piece
      > or chapter by chapter. You can find it now at:
      >
      > http://www.themoonlitroad.com/moonlitroad/intro_moonlitroad.html
      >
      > You can now discuss the stories with others on our Message Boards.
      > We've created these boards to provide you a place to meet and share
      > your own experiences and stories. You can find the Message Boards for
      > "The Moonlit Road" at:
      >
      > http://www.themoonlitroad.com/cgibin/discussions/moonlitroad/theboard/
      >
      > - We've recently created an archive of our past newsletters. If
      > you're ever looking for a story you read in one of our newsletters,
      > check:
      >
      > http://www.themoonlitroad.com/members/archives/news/news.html
      >
      > To print the newsletter, follow the instructions for printing stories
      > found on our FAQs page.
      >
      >
      > II. THE MOONLIT ROAD STORYTELLERS - LIVE
      >
      > If you live in the Atlanta area, you can catch Veronica Byrd, Jim
      > McAmis, and other storytellers from The Moonlit Road spinning creepy
      > tales of spooks, ghosts and things that go bump in the night.
      >
      > - Historic Halloween
      > October 29-30, 1999
      > Atlanta History Center
      > 130 West Paces Ferry Road
      > Atlanta, GA 30305
      > 404-814-4000
      >
      > Oct. 29, 4-8 p.m. $4 for adults and kids 6-17. Free for kids in
      > costume, kids 5 and under and Atlanta History Center members.
      >
      > Oct. 30, 2-6:30 p.m. $10 adults, $8 for students 18+ and seniors 65+,
      > $4 for youths 6-17, $3 for History Center members, free for costumed
      > children and kids 5 and under. (price includes museum admission)
      >
      > - Margaret Mitchell House and Museum
      > Oct. 30, 7-9 p.m.
      > 999 Peachtree St., Atlanta.
      > 404-249-7012
      > FREE Admission!
      >
      > For more information on these events, check:
      >
      > http://www.accessatlanta.com/custom/holidays/halloween.html
      >
      >
      > III. THE MOONLIT ROAD - ON THE RADIO
      >
      > Stories from The Moonlit Road can be heard this month on the following
      > stations:
      >
      > NOTE: Since this is public radio, programming is subject to change.
      >
      > KGNU
      > 88.5 and 93.7-FM, Boulder, Colorado
      > 99.9-FM, Ft. Collins and Northern Colorado
      > October 25, 8-9pm (Mountain),
      > (part of Art Aloud program)
      > You can also listen on the web at:
      > http://www.kgnu.org
      >
      > Peach State Public Radio - Georgia NPR Network
      > 1-2pm October 22, 24, 29, 31
      > (part of Georgia Gazette program)
      > Albany: 91.7 FM, WUNV
      > Athens: 91.7/97.9 FM, WUGA
      > Augusta: 90.7 FM, WACG
      > Brunswick: 89.1 FM, WWIO
      > Carrollton: 90.7 FM, WWGC
      > Columbus: 88.1 FM, WJSP
      > Demorest: 88.3 FM, WPPR
      > Dahlonega: 89.5 FM, WNGU
      > Fort Gaines: 90.9 FM, WJWV
      > Macon: 89.7 FM, WDCO
      > Savannah: 91.1 FM, WSVH
      > Tifton: 91.1 FM, WABR
      > Valdosta: 91.7 FM, WWET
      > Waycross: 90.1 FM, WXVS
      >
      > WRFG 89.3-FM, Atlanta, GA
      > Tuesday, October 26, 7-9pm
      > (part of Buckdancer's Choice program)
      >
      >
      > IV. FEATURE STORY:
      >
      > LITTLE RIVER CANYON'S REBIRTH (Part II)
      > By Craig Dominey
      > Copyright 1999 All Rights Reserved
      >
      > As automobile travel became commonplace, tourist traffic began posing
      > a threat to the canyon. A proposed network of roadways focused on
      > bringing more people into the canyon and expanding its commercial
      > possibilities. Private investors drew up plans for housing
      > subdivisions and resorts near the fragile canyon rim. Sewage disposal
      > and erosion were but two of the problems looming over the canyon in
      > the face of such development.
      >
      > In 1960, an amusement park called Canyonland was constructed near the
      > canyon mouth, complete with chair lift, carnival rides and a petting
      > zoo. Although Canyonland shut down in the mid-1980s, its rusty chair
      > lift towers still scar the landscape.
      >
      > As traffic increased, trash began accumulating on the canyon floor.
      > Despite the park's efforts to erect guardrails, visitors and locals
      > alike still found ways to dump household garbage and old furniture
      > over the bluffs. "Everything a human being would want to throw away
      > was down there," recalls Bill Adams, a member of the Fischer Rescue
      > Squad.
      >
      > Little River Canyon became the center of unwanted national attention
      > in 1982, when the body of 13-year-old Lisa Ann Millican was found on
      > the canyon floor. Abducted from a Rome shopping mall, Millican had
      > been tortured, shot in the back, and pushed off one of the canyon's
      > bluffs. Judith Ann and Alvin Neelley, two out-of-state drifters, were
      > eventually convicted of her murder. But the gruesome discovery only
      > contributed to the canyon's sinister reputation in the eyes of some.
      > "It sort of rubbed people wrong that the canyon should be associated
      > with it," says Adams. "As if the canyon caused the murder."
      >
      > The final straw came a few years later, when a rumor circulated that
      > Georgia's Chattooga County was going to place a landfill at the
      > headwater of Little River. This threat galvanized a group of local
      > citizens into forming Friends of Little River, an organization
      > dedicated to the development of a canyon protection plan.
      >
      > Friends of Little River found an ally in Congressman Tom Bevill, who
      > had been searching for possible federal preserve sites in his home
      > state. In 1989, Bevill introduced a bill that would fund a
      > preliminary federal study of DeSoto State Park for possible inclusion
      > in the park system. President Bush signed the bill later that year,
      > granting $150,000 for the project.
      >
      > Meanwhile, Friends of Little River organized a small volunteer cleanup
      > around at the north end of the canyon. Within a few hours,
      > twenty-five workers removed over four truckloads of garbage. Among
      > the impressed onlookers was Talmadge Butler, superintendent of DeSoto
      > State Park. "I think our success gave Talmadge the energy and
      > excitement to try and tackle the whole canyon," says Disney.
      >
      > Later that year, Butler formed a separate group called the Little
      > River Canyon Cleaning Committee. His goal was to organize an annual,
      > large-scale cleanup combining public interest with professional
      > know-how. He had little trouble finding volunteers; canoe clubs,
      > hiking clubs and environmental groups had long been concerned about
      > the canyon's rapid deterioration. Local fire and rescue squads
      > immediately volunteered their services. Due to extensive media
      > coverage, individuals and families from across the South journeyed to
      > the park to help. By the morning of the first annual "Spring Canyon
      > Cleaning," over 200 volunteers had arrived at Butler's doorstep.
      >
      > COMING NEXT ISSUE -
      >
      > A daring mission...
      >
      > V. A FINAL THOUGHT
      >
      > "In 25 years, I've never found a haunted house - just haunted people."
      >
      > Joe Nickell
      > Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal
      >
      > --part1_0.9f6352da.25424cee_boundary--
      >
      > > Archives for the list can be viewed at
      > http://www.onelist.com/archives/alabamahistory
      >
    • (no from line)
      Here s an example of some interesting historical work being done in these days of web bells and whistles... My, my, the list has fallen silent lately.. -aj
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 4, 1999
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        Here's an example of some interesting historical work being done in these
        days of web bells and whistles...

        My, my, the list has fallen silent lately..

        -aj wright // listowner
        ----------------------------Original message----------------------------


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Dina Iordanova <DI4@...>
        To: Multiple recipients of list <mcdl@...>
        Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 1999 3:39 AM
        Subject: [MCDL:2598] Journal of Multi-Media History


        > "Zelizer" <jmmh@...>
        >
        > We are pleased to announce the publication of volume 2 of
        > THE JOURNAL FOR MULTIMEDIA HISTORY.
        > http://www.albany.edu/jmmh
        >
        > Features include the award-winning article, "I Can Almost See the
        > Lights of Home~A Field Trip to Harlan County, Kentucky," by
        > Charles Hardy, III and Alessandro Portelli. (recent winner of the
        > Oral History Association's 1999 Non-print Media Award for
        > outstanding use of oral history.) Their "essay-in-sound"
        > reconceptualizes the practice of oral history scholarship.
        >
        > "Frank Capra's America" features RealAudio versions of talks by
        > Robert Brent Toplin, Lawrence Levine, and Dan T. Carter originally
        > presented at the 1999 annual meeting of the American Historical
        > Association; they are enhanced with film excerpts that highlight
        > key points in their presentations.
        >
        > The first of two hypertext essays on "Teaching and
        > Research" -- "Selling China: www.cnta.com and Cultural
        > Nationalism" -- suggests how historians can use Web sites as
        > primary source documents. The second, "Viva Computer Links not
        > Chain Links!", reviews Web sites pertaining to the US-Mexican
        > border region.
        >
        > "Historically Speaking" features an engaging interview (audio and
        > text) with Thomas Sugrue, author of THE ORIGINS OF THE
        > URBAN CRISIS and winner of the Bancroft Prize in History.
        >
        > Volume 2 also contains a variety of hypermedia reviews of Web
        > sites, CD-ROMs, and video/audio documentary productions.
        > Leading scholars evaluate substantive content, as well as discuss
        > technical, pedagogical and aesthetic issues. The reviews include
        > samples of the works reviewed.
        >
        > Check out our new issue and let us know what you think. It's at:
        > http://www.albany.edu/jmmh
        >
        > Gerald Zahavi
        > Julian Zelizer
        > Julian Zelizer
        > Assistant Professor of History and Public Policy
        > Department of History
        > Ten Broeck Hall 105
        > University at Albany
        > Albany, New York 12222
        > (518) 442-3992
        > Fax: 518-442-3477
        > zelizer@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Dr. Dina Iordanova
        > Centre for Mass Communication Research
        > University of Leicester
        > 104 Regent Road
        > Leicester LE1 7LT
        > England
        > phone 44-116-252-3877
        > fax 44-116-252-5276
        > Visit my home page at http://www.le.ac.uk/cmcr/di4/Main.html
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