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OPENING THE DOORS recounts the desegregation of the University of Alabama and Tuscaloosa

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  • A.J. Wright
    ... From: University of Alabama Press Date: Tue, Jun 11, 2013 at 5:55 PM Subject: OPENING THE DOORS recounts the desegregation of the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 11, 2013
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      ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      From: University of Alabama Press <mktg@...>
      Date: Tue, Jun 11, 2013 at 5:55 PM
      Subject: OPENING THE DOORS recounts the desegregation of the University of Alabama and Tuscaloosa



      UA Press Marketing Logo
      Opening the Doors  
      The Desegregation of the University of Alabama and the Fight for Civil Rights in Tuscaloosa 
      by B. J. Hollars 
       
      9780817317928On the 50th anniversary of the successful integration of the University of Alabama, the University of Alabama Press has published "OPENING THE DOORS: The Desegregation of the University of Alabama and the Fight for Civil Rights in Tuscaloosa" by B. J. Hollars of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

       

      On June 11, 1963, George Wallace attempted to prevent Vivian Malone Jones and James Hood, two black students, from registering for classes at the University of Alabama. In his theatrical "stand in the schoolhouse door," Wallace gave Alabama and the nation just two choices: integration or "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever." The stark simplicity of Wallace's gesture, focused as it was on Malone and Hood, often overshadows the wider story of the sustained effort to end the segregation of public facilities in the city and county. Beginning earlier and continuing well into 1964, Tuscaloosa witnessed acts of both heroism and savagery on the way to integration.


      Hollars bases OPENING THE DOORS on fresh first-hand accounts, one-on-one interviews, and newly unclassified files to transport readers into the classrooms, churches, city offices, homes and streets of Tuscaloosa, including secret negotiations between the U.S. Justice Department, the White House, and Wallace himself.


      Into this complex situation came 28-year-old African-American reverend T. Y. Rogers, an Alabama native and protégé of Martin Luther King Jr. In the face of intimidation and resistance, including the tear-gas bombing of the First African Baptist Church, Rogers led mass meetings, a boycott of local buses, and other nonviolent protests that led to the elimination of separate public facilities.


      In this fascinating account, Hollars also sheds light on the relationship between the University and its host city, the so-called split between "gown" and "town." Separate but interdependent, each with its own customs and traditions, the University and city could act in harmony. The years 1963 and 1964, however, brought into focus a purposeful divide between the two. A story that is both unique to west Alabama but whose lessons are emblematic of the civil rights movement across the South and elsewhere, OPENING THE DOORS is a valuable and timely addition to our shared memory of Alabama history, non-violent political change, and the civil rights movement. On sale now.


      2013. 304 pp.
      18 photographs 
      978-0-8173-1792-8/Cloth 
      978-0-8173-8669-6/Ebook 
      $34.95 

       

        

      Also of Interest 
       
      Alabama's Civil Rights Trail:
      An Illustrated Guide to the Cradle of Freedom
      by Frye Gaillard

      2010. 328 pp.
      978-0-8173-5581-4/Quality Paper
      $24.95 
       
      No other state has embraced and preserved its civil rights history more thoroughly than Alabama. Nor is there a place where that history is richer. Alabama's Civil Rights Trail tells of Alabama's great civil rights events, as well as its lesser-known moments, in a compact and accessible narrative, paired with a practical guide to Alabama's preserved civil rights sites and monuments. Foreword by commentator and journalist Juan Williams.

      Frye Gaillard has been a journalist for the Associated Press and the Charlotte Observer. He is the author of Race, Rock and Religion: Profiles from a Southern Journalist, The Dream Long Deferred: The Landmark Struggle for Desegregation in Charlotte, North Carolina, Becoming Truly Free: 300 Years of Black History in the Carolinas, and Cradle of Freedom: Alabama and the Movement that Changed America. He is currently writer-in-residence at the University of South Alabama in Mobile.
        
      To order, contact our Chicago Distribution Center at 1-800-621-2736 or (fax) 1-800-621-8476 or visit our website at www.uapress.ua.edu
      For more information, write JD Wilson at jdwilson@....
       
      University of Alabama Press | Box 870380 | Tuscaloosa | AL | 35487-0380

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