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Civil War History article//Status of the list

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  • AJ Wright
    I haven t seen it...how about telling us about it? While I m here, I may as well point out that the list currently has 37 sub- scribers. Over half seem to be
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 12, 1998
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      I haven't seen it...how about telling us about it?

      While I'm here, I may as well point out that the list currently has 37 sub-
      scribers. Over half seem to be outside Alabama!

      Don't be bashful, folks...feel free to speak up!

      AJ Wright//alabamahistory moderator
    • fitz@xxxxxx.xxx
      Dear Moderator, Can t say I m surprised that your subscribers are substantially from outside the state. Those of us who are interested in Alabama topics but
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 13, 1998
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        Dear Moderator,

        Can't say I'm surprised that your subscribers are substantially from
        outside the state. Those of us who are interested in Alabama topics but
        geographically distant feel sort of isolated; we lack the sort of face
        to face discussion of the issues that locals take for granted.

        As for the Paul Horton article, it is in the latest issue of Civil War
        History--which, for those of you who haven't seen it, is the most
        scholarly of the journals dealing with this topic of intense popular
        interest. I haven't got the article at hand, but it is a case study
        of Lawrence County during the war.

        The argument (from memory) is a familiar one by this point, that there
        was substantial reluctance to secede in this north Alabama county, and
        widespread disaffection from the Confederacy by the middle phases of
        the war. My sense is that the research for the piece is unusually
        good, that Horton has turned up a great deal of material seldom
        encountered even by specialists in the field. In one striking
        instance, Horton finds evidence that the main Confederate official in
        the area, General Roddy, solicited reluctant draftees with the promise that he
        would keep them close to home--and that he was engaged in indirect
        negotiations with the Union command for a separate peace well before
        the end of the war.

        None of this, I suspect, is too startling, but it is the best detail
        study I've seen in Alabama. The most novel thing I saw is the
        author's assertion that the anti-Confederates were not that based
        among poorer non-slaveholders--the Winston County image of Unionism--
        but that anti-secession and anti-war sentiment were cross-class
        alliances, with plenty of Tennessee Valley planter participation.

        I have my doubts, but it is an interesting position, and other
        scholars are coming up with similar conclusions.

        Thanks, Michael Fitzgerald
        fitz@...


        > From: AJ Wright <MEDS002@...>
        >
        > I haven't seen it...how about telling us about it?
        >
        > While I'm here, I may as well point out that the list currently has 37 sub-
        > scribers. Over half seem to be outside Alabama!
        >
        > Don't be bashful, folks...feel free to speak up!
        >
        > AJ Wright//alabamahistory moderator
        >
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