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  • Amos J Wright
    UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA PRESS ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF ANNUAL MANUSCRIPT PRIZES TUSCALOOSA, AL-September 11, 2006. Each year, The University of Alabama Press awards
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 12, 2006
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      UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA PRESS ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF ANNUAL MANUSCRIPT
      PRIZES

      TUSCALOOSA, AL-September 11, 2006. Each year, The University of Alabama
      Press awards prizes for the best manuscripts in the fields of southern
      history and American literature. This year's winners, for manuscripts
      submitted and accepted in 2005, are Gregory Waselkov of Mobile, Alabama,
      and Les Harrison of Richmond, Virginia. They each will receive a framed
      certificate, a cash prize, and publication of their work by The
      University of Alabama Press.
      Waselkov's work A Conquering Spirit: Fort Mims and the Redstick War of
      1813-1814 is the recipient of the Anne B. & James B. McMillan Manuscript
      Prize. Harrison's manuscript "The Temple and the Forum: The American
      Museum and Cultural Authority in Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, and
      Whitman" is the recipient of the Elizabeth Agee Manuscript Prize.
      Waselkov's book will be published later this fall; Harrison's is
      scheduled for publication in the spring of 2007.
      The McMillan Prize has been awarded since 1995 to the manuscript chosen
      as most deserving in Alabama or Southern history or culture. It was
      established to honor James B. McMillan, founding director of the Press,
      former chairman of the University's English department, and a renowned
      dialectologist. The University of Alabama Press faculty editorial board,
      which consists of scholars from all public universities in the state
      that award a doctoral degree, confers the prize on the basis of
      scholarly excellence.
      Gregory Waselkov is professor of anthropology and director of the Center
      for Archaeological Studies at the University of South Alabama. A
      Conquering Spirit offers a detailed historical and archaeological
      examination of the impact of the massacre at Fort Mims on August 30,
      1813, in what is now Alabama and was then the southern frontier of the
      United States. It is best known as a stunningly bloody Creek Indian
      victory against encroaching white settlers, which took place in the
      midst of the War of 1812. And it had a great impact on the development
      of American history, including aiding in the rise to prominence of
      Andrew Jackson. But Waselkov demonstrates that the truth of who fought
      whom and why is much murkier than typically imagined, and the
      implications of this fact in reconsidering American colonial attitudes
      towards Native Americans are enormous.
      The Agee Prize was established by the Stubbs and Agee families to honor
      Elizabeth Agee, longtime Birmingham bookseller who described herself as
      "a reader and lover of books." It is a celebration of Agee's interest in
      American literature and a recognition of the Press's publication of
      books in the field. The faculty editorial board confers the prize
      annually on the manuscript that best represents outstanding scholarship
      in the field of American literary studies.

      (more)

      UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA PRESS ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF ANNUAL MANUSCRIPT
      PRIZES
      (Page 2)
      Les Harrison is a post-doctoral lecturer in English at Texas A&M
      University. The Temple and the Forum will be his first book. It examines
      the shared concerns and practices of nineteenth-century American museums
      and select writers working at the same time: Nathanial Hawthorne, Herman
      Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Walt Whitman. Harrison focuses on
      three of the era's most significant museums: Chgarles Wilson Peale's
      Philadelphia Museum, P.T. Barnum's American Museum, and the United
      States National Museum at the Smithsonian to discuss the two dominant
      models in the struggle over what museums ought to be: the temple, an
      institution for the projection and protection of official culture, or
      the forum, a populist, marketplace counterpart.
      Recent winners of the Agee Prize include Ashbery's Forms of Attention by
      Andrew DuBois; The Modernist Nation: Generation, Renaissance, and
      Twentieth-Century American Literature by Michael Soto; Emancipating
      Pragmatism: Emerson, Jazz, and Experimental Writing by Michael Magee;
      and The Obligation toward the Difficult Whole: Postmodernist Long Poems
      by Brian McHale. The Agee prize has previously recognized outstanding
      works on Wallace Stevens, James Wright, John Steinbeck, Flannery
      O'Connor, Emily Dickinson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Walt Whitman.
      In past years, the McMillan Prize has been awarded to Joey Brackner's
      Alabama Folk Pottery; Wayne Flynt's magisterial Alabama in the Twentieth
      Century, David Duke's In the Trenches with Jesus and Marx: Harry F. Ward
      and the Struggle for Social Justice, and J. Mills Thornton III's
      Dividing Lines: Municipal Politics and the Struggle for Civil Rights in
      Montgomery, Birmingham, and Selma. Other winning manuscripts have
      focused on such diverse topics as Southern Baptists, Civil Rights,
      religion, Alabama politics, Southern missionaries, and southeastern
      archaeology.
      The University of Alabama Press is one of the fastest-growing publishers
      in the South. In addition to its respected lists in archaeology,
      military history, Judaic studies, literary criticism, communication,
      sports, Civil Rights, religion, southern history, and regional topics,
      it is the publisher of the national trade imprint Fire Ant Books. These
      "books with bite" feature compelling stories aimed at a broad audience.
      Concentrating on southern culture and history, and including both
      original works and reprint editions, they represent some of the finest
      work published by university presses today. Since April 2006 it has also
      been the publisher of Fiction Collective 2, an imprint that for more
      than thirty years has presented some of the world's most exciting,
      innovative, and experimental fiction.
      # # #

      For additional information, contact: Dennis Lloyd *
      dlloyd@... * direct line: 205-348-9534


      ************************************************************************
      JACKSONVILLE STATE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR WINS
      PRESTIGIOUS STATE HISTORY BOOK AWARD

      University of Alabama Press Publications Honored for Fourth Year in a
      Row
      TUSCALOOSA, AL-September 12, 2006. Harvey H. Jackson III, an Alabama
      native and professor and chair of the history and foreign languages
      department at Jacksonville State University, is this year's winner of
      the Alabama Historical Association's Clinton Jackson Coley Book Award.
      The award is presented in alternate years, and recognizes excellence in
      a new study that focuses on local historical concerns. Jackson, the
      author of numerous works on Alabama history, was honored for his most
      recent book, Inside Alabama: A Personal History of My State. The book
      was published by the University of Alabama Press in early 2004, and has
      already become a standard text used in Alabama history classes
      throughout the state.
      The award ceremony took place this past spring at the Alabama Historical
      Association's annual meeting, held this year in Fairhope, Alabama.
      Presenting the award was Paul Pruitt, law librarian at the University of
      Alabama, who served as chair of this year's Coley Award committee.
      Reviewing the book in the Birmingham News, Jim Noles wrote, "If you want
      your Alabama history delivered to you as if you were chatting with a
      favorite professor over a slab of ribs at Dreamland or between cold
      beers at the Flora-Bama, then you'll certainly enjoy Harvy H. Jackson
      III's political history of his home state."
      In his review broadcast on Alabama Public Radio, Don Noble said, "This
      book is the kind of history that everyone should read and everyone can
      read with profit and more to the point, maybe, enjoyment."
      "This is not your usual schoolbook on Alabama history," proclaimed David
      Robertson, writing in the Anniston Star. "Thank heavens, Harvey Jackson
      has written an entirely different sort of history, and it is much closer
      to the people and events that make the real Alabama." Similar praise
      appeared in newspapers throughout the state and in a number of academic
      history journals. Rare is the book that speaks so well to both
      audiences.
      This marked the second consecutive time a book published by The
      University of Alabama Press received the Coley Award; Alan Grady's When
      Good Men Do Nothing: The Assassination of Albert Patterson won in 2004,
      the last time it was given. In odd-numbered years, the Alabama
      Historical Association gives the James F. Sulzby Award, to honor a book
      that has made the most significant contribution to Alabama history.
      Books published by The University of Alabama Press have won this prize
      every year since 2001: Wayne Flynt's Alabama in the Twentieth Century
      (2005); J. Mills Thornton III's Dividing Lines: Municipal Politics and
      the Struggle for Civil Rights in Montgomery, Birmingham, and Selma
      (2003); and Andrew Manis's A Fire You Can't Put Out: The Civil Rigths
      Life of Birmingham's Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth (2001).
      Inside Alabama was published under Alabama's Fire Ant Books imprint.
      These "books with bite" feature compelling stories aimed at a broad
      audience and are published in affordable paperback editions.
      Concentrating on military history and southern culture and history, and
      including both original volumes and reprint editions, they represent
      some of the finest work published by university presses today.
      # # #
      For additional information, contact: Dennis Lloyd *
      dlloyd@... * direct line: 205-348-9534

      ************************************************************************
      ****

      UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA PRESS RECEIVES AWARDS
      Military Order of the Stars and Bars Honors Civil War Titles

      TUSCALOOSA, AL-September 9, 2006. The University of Alabama Press, one
      of the largest and fastest-growing publishers in the South, has received
      a prestigious publication award for the second year in a row.
      At a ceremony earlier this month, Philip H. Law, Commander General of
      the Military Order of the Stars and Bars, presented Daniel J.J. Ross,
      Director of the University of Alabama Press, with the General Basil W.
      Duke Award. The award, which includes a trophy and a $1,000 check, was
      created to recognize publishers who reissue classic works on the Civil
      War.
      The 2006 award was given for the book The Privations of a Private:
      Campaigning with the First Tennessee, C.S.A., and Life Thereafter.
      Originally published in 1905, it is a memoir by Marcus B. Toney,
      originally from near Nashville, Tennessee. He served with the First
      Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment in campaigns in West Virginia, at
      Shiloh, Chickamauga, and the Wilderness, where he was captured. Much of
      the interest in the book lies in Toney's sober and detailed reporting of
      his experiences as a Federal POW. The new edition, published in November
      2005, includes an introduction by the Civil War scholar Robert E. Hunt.
      Also attending the ceremony were press personnel, Paul Bryant Jr. of the
      University of Alabama Board of Trustees, and several members of the Gen.
      Josiah Gorgas Chapter of the Military Order of the Stars and Bars. Based
      in Tuscaloosa and chartered in July 2006, it is already the largest
      chapter of this national organization in the state of Alabama.
      Because a series of miscommunications prevented the Press from receiving
      the 2005 award in a formal ceremony, Commander General Law also
      presented The University of Alabama Press with a handsome trophy and a
      check for having won the previous year. That year, the award was given
      for Blockade Runners of the Confederacy by Hamilton Cochran. Originally
      published in 1958, it offered the first in-depth look at the dashing
      figures, spies, and fast ships that ran the Union blockade of
      Confederate seaports. It also provided an overall assessment of the
      blockade's conception, effectiveness, and impact on the Southern
      populace. The new edition, published in by UAP in February 2005,
      features an introduction by Robert M. Browning Jr.
      Both books were published under the Press's Fire Ant Books imprint.
      These "books with bite" feature compelling stories aimed at a broad
      audience and are published in affordable paperback editions.
      Concentrating on military history and southern culture and history, and
      including both original volumes and reprint editions, they represent
      some of the finest work published by university presses today.
      Ross pledged that the funds from the award would be used to support the
      Alabama's commitment to publishing books about the Civil War, both
      original research and reprint editions. With a number of Civil War
      offerings scheduled to be published in the fall and spring, The
      University of Alabama Press hopes to be a perennial contender for the
      Military Order of the Stars and Bars' General Basil W. Duke Award in the
      years to come.
      # # #
      For additional information, contact: Dennis Lloyd *
      dlloyd@... * 205-348-9534

      ************************************************************************
      ****

      A.J. Wright, M.L.S.
      Associate Professor
      Director, Section on the History of Anesthesia

      Department of Anesthesiology Library
      University of Alabama at Birmingham
      619 19th Street South, JT965
      Birmingham AL 35249-6810

      (205) 975-0158
      (205) 975-5963 [fax]
      ajwright@...

      http://www.anes.uab.edu/libraryinformation.htm
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