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Re: Will the real Horace Wilkinson...

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  • Ed Bridges
    Jeff, Thanks for the correction and additional cite. It may have been a paper Glen presented at an AHA meeting that I recalled rather than a Review article.
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 9, 1999
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      Jeff,
      Thanks for the correction and additional cite. It may have been a paper Glen presented at an AHA meeting that I recalled rather than a Review article. Thanks also for providing the book title; it's one that I need to add to my reading list.

      Ed

      >>> Jeff Jakeman <jakemrj@...> 03/09/99 09:00AM >>>
      From: Jeff Jakeman <jakemrj@...>

      Brian: see Glenn Feldman's book _From Demagogue to Dixiecrat: Horace
      Wilkinson and the Politics of Race (University Press of America, 1995).

      By the way, the Alabama Review home page (www.auburn.edu/~bamarev/) has
      links to tables of contents for the Ala Review, Ala Hist Qtly, Gulf Coast
      Hist Rev, and Ala Heritage. I did a quick check for the article on
      Wilkinson that Ed mentioned but had no success. Perhaps he was thinking
      of Feldman's book.

      ******************************************************************************
      Robert J. Jakeman, Associate Professor Voice: 334-844-6634
      Editor, The Alabama Review Fax: 334-844-6673
      History Department Internet: jakemrj@...
      310 Thach Hall Alabama Review Home Page:
      Auburn University, AL 36849-5207 http://www.auburn.edu/~bamarev/
      ******************************************************************************

      On Mon, 8 Mar 1999, Ed Bridges wrote:

      > From: "Ed Bridges" <EBridges@...>
      >
      > Brian, Glen Feldman mentions Wilkinson in an article on lynching in the
      > Alabama Review, April 1995, p. 140. I also recall an article just on
      > Wilkinson in the Review but don't have time now to go through all recent
      > issues. I think it appeared in the early 1990's.
      >
      > Ed Bridges
      >
      > >>> Brian Kelly <kellyb@...> 03/08/99 03:32PM >>>
      > I'm wondering if any of you out on H-South or Alabama history can
      > help me tie up a loose end in my research on Alabama coal miners. I have
      > found documents from the 1921 trial of a number of National Guardsmen
      > implicated in the lynching of a white union miner by the name of Will
      > Baird. Baird was snatched from a Walker County jail by Guardsmen for
      > having shot one of their number in retaliation for their having murdered
      > his father, a lay preacher and UMW activist, during the bitter 1920
      > Alabama coal strike. His body was later found riddled with bullets and
      > the Guardsmen were brought to trial (their defense was organized and
      > paid for by coal operators, Chamber of Commerce types, etc.; ex-Governor
      > B. B. Comer, who had broken the 1908 strike, contributed to the legal
      > fund on the grounds that the killing "had some element of self-defense
      > in it.").
      > According to newspaper accounts, a UMW sympathizer (and Judge?)
      > named Horace Wilkinson condemned the soldiers' defense team for
      > injecting race into the trial by "summoning a negro official of the UMW"
      > whom it had no intention to call upon, but who was kept in the court
      > throughout the proceedings "and pointed out by friends of the accused as
      > a union leader to PREJUDICE THE STATE'S CASE." (emphasis in original).
      > The tactic is unsurprising, given the polarization that had taken
      > hold of the Birmingham district during the strike and the frequent
      > resort of the operators and their allies to race-baiting in
      > confrontations with the UMW. What I am curious about, though, is
      > Wilkinson's background. In his But for Birmingham, Glen Eskew mentions a
      > lawyer named Horace C. Wilkinson (p. 79) and describes him as a
      > "Klansman, Dixiecrat, and all-around race-baiter." Is this the same
      > Wilkinson? If so, does he evolve from a race liberal to a Klansman in
      > the years between 1920 and the early sixties? Or was his condemnation of
      > the operators' strategy a tactical (and cynical) adjustment aimed at
      > securing the moral high ground? Was Eskew's Wilkinson the son of the
      > Horace Wilkinson I've come across? Any leads, biographical details,
      > would be much appreciated.
      >
      > Brian Kelly
      > Visiting Assistnat Professor of History
      > Florida International University
      >
      >
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