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FW: Info: 2002 Lillian Smith Book Awards Announced

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  • A.J. Wright
    A couple of Alabama connections in these awards...aj wright // ajwright@uab.edu ... From: Finnegan, Terence [mailto:FinneganT@wpunj.edu] Sent: Wednesday,
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 4, 2002
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      A couple of Alabama connections in these awards...aj wright //
      ajwright@...



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Finnegan, Terence [mailto:FinneganT@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, September 18, 2002 2:30 PM
      To: H-SOUTH@...
      Subject: Info: 2002 Lillian Smith Book Awards Announced


      SOUTHERN REGIONAL COUNCIL ANNOUNCES
      2002 LILLIAN SMITH BOOK AWARD WINNERS

      Four exceptional books have been selected to receive the 2002 Lillian Smith
      Book Awards. Presented
      annually by the Southern Regional Council for 34 years, the Smith Awards
      recognize authors whose
      fiction and non-fiction writing extends the legacy of the outspoken writer,
      educator, and social
      critic who challenged her fellow Southerners and all Americans on issues of
      social and racial
      justice. The Lillian Smith Book Awards are the South's oldest literary
      honor.
      The 2002 Lillian Smith Book Award winners are:

      FICTION:
      BOMBINGHAM by ANTHONY GROOMS, Free Press

      NON-FICTION:
      GETTING RIGHT WITH GOD: SOUTHERN BAPTISTS AND DESGREGATION, 1945-1995 by
      MARK NEWMAN, University
      of Alabama Press; and
      DYING IN THE CITY OF THE BLUES: SICKLE CELL ANEMIA AND THE POLITICS OF RACE
      AND HEALTH by Keith
      Wailoo, University of North Carolina Press

      SPECIAL AWARD:
      REMEMBERING JIM CROW: AFRICAN AMERICANS TELL ABOUT LIFE IN THE SEGREGATED
      SOUTH edited by WILLIAM
      H. CHAFE, RAYMOND GAVINS, and ROBERT KORSTAD with PAUL ORTIZ, ROBERT
      PARRISH, JENNIFER
      RITTERHOUSE, KEISHA ROBERTS, and NICOLE WALIGORA-DAVIS, The New Press in
      association with
      Lyndhurst Books of the Center for Documentary Studies.

      Winning authors will receive the awards at a noon luncheon on Friday,
      October 18th at the Colony
      Square Hotel in midtown Atlanta. A free young writer's workshop, designed
      for high school and
      college students, will be held prior to the awards ceremony. Dori Sanders
      will lead the workshop,
      entitled "The Role of Food and Storytelling in Creative Writing." Sanders is
      a 1990 Lillian Smith
      Book Award winner for Clover: A Novel. Book signings and discussions will
      follow the luncheon.
      Former SRC President Patt Derian chairs the 2002 Lillian Smith Book Awards
      jury. The jury also
      includes historians Vicki Crawford and Jerry Ward, and retired attorney
      Pegram Harrison.
      The Smith Awards are open to the public. For information and tickets visit:
      www.southerncouncil.org/comm/smith.html.

      LILLIAN SMITH BOOK AWARD WINNERS
      ANTHONY GROOMS will become one of only two authors to receive the Lillian
      Smith Award twice when
      his novel BOMBINGHAM is honored. Connecting the war-torn rice fields of
      Vietnam with the
      riot-filled streets of Birmingham, Alabama, Bombingham tells the story of
      Walter Burke. As a child
      in Birmingham, Burke witnesses the swelling resistance of local African
      Americans to the terrors
      of segregation and white violence while he watches his mother slowly die of
      cancer. Years later,
      he returns to those experiences as he grapples with the task of writing a
      letter to the family of
      a friend who was just killed in combat at his side. Joining two pivotal
      periods in the American
      experience, Bombingham makes an important contribution to our understanding
      of that period of
      great social change.

      Anthony Grooms lives in Atlanta and is Professor of Creative Writing at
      Kennesaw State University.
      Trouble No More: Stories by Grooms received the 1996 Lillian Smith Book
      Award for fiction.

      In GETTING RIGHT WITH GOD: SOUTHERN BAPTISTS AND DESEGREGATION, 1945-1995,
      MARK NEWMAN examines
      the evolution of Southern Baptists' attitudes toward African Americans
      during a tumultuous period
      of social change in the United States. In this study, Newman reveals that
      Southern Baptists were
      more diverse in their attitudes toward segregation than previously assumed.
      Focusing on the eleven
      states of the old Confederacy, Newman not only offers an in depth analysis
      of Baptist
      institutions, but also probes beyond these by examining the response of
      pastors and lay people to
      changing race relations. Newman identifies three major blocs of Baptists'
      opinions about race
      relations: a hard-line segregationist minority that believed God had
      ordained slavery in the
      Bible; a more moderate majority that accepted the prevailing social order of
      racial segregation;
      and a progressive group of lay people, pastors, and denominational leaders
      who criticized and
      ultimately rejected discrimination as contrary to biblical teachings.

      Mark Newman is Professor of American Studies at the University of Derby in
      the United Kingdom.

      In DYING IN THE CITY OF THE BLUES: SICKLE CELL ANEMIA AND THE POLITICS OF
      RACE AND HEALTH, KEITH
      WAILOO chronicles the history of sickle cell anemia in the United States,
      tracing its
      transformation from an "invisible" malady to a powerful, yet contested,
      cultural symbol of
      African-American pain and suffering. Focusing on the story of Memphis,
      Tennessee, where on of the
      nation's first sickle cell clinics was opened, Wailoo uses medical journals,
      patients' accounts,
      black newspapers, and blues lyrics to reveal how the recognition, treatment,
      social understanding,
      and symbolism of the disease evolved in the twentieth century. This book
      offers valuable new
      insight into the African-American experience, the impact of race relations
      and ideologies on
      health care, and the politics of science, medicine, and disease.

      Keith Wailoo is professor of history, jointly appointed in the Institute for
      Health, Health Care
      Policy, and Aging Research, at Rutgers University.

      REMEMBERING JIM CROW: AFRICAN AMERICANS TELL ABOUT LIFE IN THE
      SEGREGATED SOUTH was edited by
      WILLIAM H. CHAFE, RAYMOND GAVINS, and ROBERT KORSTAD with PAUL ORTIZ, ROBERT
      PARRISH, JENNIFER
      RITTERHOUSE, KEISHA ROBERTS, and NICOLE WALIGORA-DAVIS. This team of
      researchers, and editors,
      along with the dozens of interviewers who worked on the Behind the Veil
      project amassed nearly
      1,300 oral histories of African Americans living under the profound and
      unrelenting racial
      oppression of the Jim Crow South. From that massive collection was born
      Remembering Jim Crow, an
      extraordinary collection of vivid and compelling stories-both in print and
      audio-revealing the
      countless ways in which segregation encroached on the lives of African
      Americans. But this
      collection stands also as a testament to how black southerners fought back
      against the system,
      raising children, building churches and schools, running businesses, and
      struggling for respect in
      a society that denied them the most basic rights. In two one-hour compact
      discs and a collection
      of interview transcripts and rare photographs, Remembering Jim Crow fills a
      great void in
      twentieth century African-American history.

      William H. Chafe, project director of Behind the Veil, is dean of the
      faculty of arts and
      sciences, vice provost for undergraduate education, and professor of history
      at Duke University.
      Raymond Gavins, project director of Behind the Veil, is professor of history
      at Duke University.
      Robert Korstad, project director of Behind the Veil, is an associate
      professor of public policy
      studies and history at Duke University. Paul Ortiz is an assistant professor
      in community studies
      at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Robert Parrish is a history
      graduate student at Duke
      University. Jennifer Ritterhouse is an assistant professor in history at
      Utah State University.
      Keisha Roberts is a research assistant and coordinator for the Behind the
      Veil project. Nicole
      Waligora-Davis is an assistant professor in English at Cornell University.

      ABOUT THE SOUTHERN REGIONAL COUNCIL
      The mission of the Southern Regional Council is to promote racial justice,
      protect democratic
      rights, and broaden civic participation in the Southern United States. Since
      its founding in 1919
      as the Commission on Interracial Cooperation, SRC has engaged Southern
      communities on issues of
      democracy and race. Today, the Council's programs are responding to three
      key trends in the
      American South: unprecedented levels of immigration to the South, a dramatic
      decrease in youth
      voting, and the loss of significant black political gains during the 1990s.
      The Council is using
      its expertise in community and youth empowerment to address the challenges
      presented by today's
      demographic and political changes. In the new century, SRC is working to
      build partnerships
      between African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and whites and
      empowering youth, ages 16 to
      22, to understand their role in society and to involve them in the act of
      civic engagement,
      including voting. For more information on the Council's programs, visit:
      www.southerncouncil.org.



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