Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Exercise 6.8 clarification

Expand Messages
  • icewind0
    I think Exercise 6.8 is unclear in describing what it is asking the student to do. I think my problem is that I m having trouble visualizing the game tree.
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 3, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      I think Exercise 6.8 is unclear in describing what it is asking the
      student to do.

      I think my problem is that I'm having trouble visualizing the game
      tree. Does a "die-roll sequence" define the game tree? What exactly is
      a "die-roll sequence"? I'm assuming its just 50 rolls of the die. Is
      this incorrect? If someone could perhaps rephrase the question or
      provide any insight into what 6.8 is looking for, I'd appreaciate it.
      Maybe showing the game state tree created by some sequence would be
      helpful. The question is below so you don't have to reach for your
      book. :) Thanks.

      6.8 Consider the following procedure for choosing moves in games with
      chance nodes:
      - Generate some die-roll sequences (say, 50) down to a suitable
      depth (say, 8)
      - With known die rolls, the game tree becomes deterministoc. For
      each die-roll sequence, solve the resulting deterministic game tree
      using alpha-beta.
      - Use the results to estimate the value of each move and to choose
      the best.

      Will this procedure work well? Why (not)?
    • Serguei Mokhov
      ... From: icewind0 Sent: October 03, 2003 2:31 PM ... No. It only defines a particular path within the tree. ... An outcome of N rolls
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 4, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        IMHO:

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "icewind0" <icewind0@...>
        Sent: October 03, 2003 2:31 PM

        > I think my problem is that I'm having trouble visualizing the game
        > tree. Does a "die-roll sequence" define the game tree?

        No. It only defines a particular path within the tree.

        > What exactly is
        > a "die-roll sequence"?

        An outcome of N rolls of the dice.

        > I'm assuming its just 50 rolls of the die. Is
        > this incorrect?

        No, there are 50 sequences, 8 rolls each. Each sequence
        is a path within the tree.

        -s

        > The question is below so you don't have to reach for your
        > book. :) Thanks.
        >
        > 6.8 Consider the following procedure for choosing moves in games with
        > chance nodes:
        > - Generate some die-roll sequences (say, 50) down to a suitable
        > depth (say, 8)
        > - With known die rolls, the game tree becomes deterministoc. For
        > each die-roll sequence, solve the resulting deterministic game tree
        > using alpha-beta.
        > - Use the results to estimate the value of each move and to choose
        > the best.
        >
        > Will this procedure work well? Why (not)?
      • Peter Norvig
        ... A die-roll sequence is 8 rolls (say). There are 50 different sequences. Each one determines a game tree. In each of those trees, there are only moves for
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 4, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          On Friday, October 3, 2003, at 11:31 AM, icewind0 wrote:

          > I think Exercise 6.8 is unclear in describing what it is asking the
          > student to do.
          >
          > I think my problem is that I'm having trouble visualizing the game
          > tree. Does a "die-roll sequence" define the game tree? What exactly is
          > a "die-roll sequence"? I'm assuming its just 50 rolls of the die. Is
          > this incorrect? If someone could perhaps rephrase the question or
          > provide any insight into what 6.8 is looking for, I'd appreaciate it.
          > Maybe showing the game state tree created by some sequence would be
          > helpful. The question is below so you don't have to reach for your
          > book. :) Thanks.

          A die-roll sequence is 8 rolls (say). There are 50 different
          sequences. Each one determines a game tree. In each of those trees,
          there are only moves for the two players; the rolls are fixed. So the
          first player has a chose of moves with the first given roll (say, a 6)
          and the second player then gets a choice of moves with her roll (say a
          5).

          >
          > 6.8 Consider the following procedure for choosing moves in games with
          > chance nodes:
          > - Generate some die-roll sequences (say, 50) down to a suitable
          > depth (say, 8)
          > - With known die rolls, the game tree becomes deterministoc. For
          > each die-roll sequence, solve the resulting deterministic game tree
          > using alpha-beta.
          > - Use the results to estimate the value of each move and to choose
          > the best.
          >
          > Will this procedure work well? Why (not)?
          >
          >
          > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          > ---------------------~-->
          > Buy Ink Cartridges or Refill Kits for your HP, Epson, Canon or Lexmark
          > Printer at MyInks.com. Free s/h on orders $50 or more to the US &
          > Canada.
          > http://www.c1tracking.com/l.asp?cid=5511
          > http://us.click.yahoo.com/mOAaAA/3exGAA/qnsNAA/7brrlB/TM
          > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
          > ~->
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > aima-talk-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
        • Gobinath
          Hi all, What happens when two Deep Blue Chess Program[Deep Blue A vs. Deep Blue B] compete with each other?.Is this game leads to draw? what are the factors
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 5, 2003
          • 0 Attachment

            Hi all,

                      What happens when two Deep Blue Chess Program[Deep Blue A vs. Deep Blue B] compete with each other?.Is this game leads to draw?

            what are the factors influence the win for this game?[either for A or B].

            How any one of these competents make their first move?[either randomly or based on probabilistic chance for win]

            finally, what are the advantages of minimax search algorithm?

            with regards,

            gobinath narayanasamy

             

             

            Yahoo! India Matrimony: Find your partner online. Post your profile.

          • Maithreebhanu
            I think it will end in a draw. But if it ended in a win it would be more facinating. bhanu Gobinath wrote: Hi all, What happens when
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 8, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              I think it will end in a draw. But if it ended in a win it would be more facinating.
               
              bhanu
               
              Gobinath <gobinath_kvp@...> wrote:

              Hi all,

                        What happens when two Deep Blue Chess Program[Deep Blue A vs. Deep Blue B] compete with each other?.Is this game leads to draw?

              what are the factors influence the win for this game?[either for A or B].

              How any one of these competents make their first move?[either randomly or based on probabilistic chance for win]

              finally, what are the advantages of minimax search algorithm?

              with regards,

              gobinath narayanasamy

               

               

              Yahoo! India Matrimony: Find your partner online. Post your profile.

              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              aima-talk-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              Do you Yahoo!?
              The New Yahoo! Shopping - with improved product search

            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.