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Is the brain an analog computer?

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  • Eray Ozkural
    That the computation is analog can explain, among other things, that we never see pixels :D I know it sounds silly, as I usually don t consider theses from
    Message 1 of 4 , May 1, 2009
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      That the computation is analog can explain, among other things, that
      we never see pixels :D

      I know it sounds silly, as I usually don't consider theses from
      introspection, but give it some thought and you will see what I mean.
      I want to make this a small section of my philosophy book that I plan
      to write after Singularity.

      Cheers,

      --
      Eray Ozkural, PhD candidate. Comp. Sci. Dept., Bilkent University, Ankara
      Research Assistant, Erendiz Supercomputer Inc.
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ai-philosophy
      http://myspace.com/arizanesil http://myspace.com/malfunct
    • Michael Olea
      ... You might want to have a look at: Eliasmith, C. (2000) Is the brain analog or digital?: The solution and its consequences for cognitive science. Cognitive
      Message 2 of 4 , May 1, 2009
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        On May 1, 2009, at 8:33 AM, Eray Ozkural wrote:



        That the computation is analog can explain, among other things, that
        we never see pixels :D

        I know it sounds silly, as I usually don't consider theses from
        introspection, but give it some thought and you will see what I mean.
        I want to make this a small section of my philosophy book that I plan
        to write after Singularity.


        You might want to have a look at:

        Eliasmith, C. (2000) Is the brain analog or digital?: The solution and its consequences for cognitive science. Cognitive Science Quarterly. 1(2): 147-170.


        and:

        Eliasmith, C. (in press). How we ought to understand computation in the brain. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science.

        http://arts.uwaterloo.ca/~celiasmi/Papers/eliasmith.2009.computation%20in%20the%20brain.shps.pdf


        Cheers,
        -- Michael

      • iro3isdx
        ... Well, nevermind what Eray wrote, but he did initiate the topic. The brain is not a computer. Therefore the brain is not an analog computer. QED ;) I have
        Message 3 of 4 , May 1, 2009
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          --- In ai-philosophy@yahoogroups.com, Eray Ozkural <erayo@...> wrote:

          Well, nevermind what Eray wrote, but he did initiate the topic.

          The brain is not a computer.
          Therefore the brain is not an analog computer.
          QED ;)

          I have never found the case for brain-as-computer to be convincing.

          Thanks for the reference, Michael. It is an interesting read.

          For myself, I would say that the brain is hybrid - a mix of continuous
          and discrete processing. Incidently, I think we should be saying
          "discrete" rather than "digital." As far as I can tell, the only
          digits that the brain deals with are the fingers and toes. But
          my point here is that "digital" is a cultural term, related to the
          particular ways we and discretize and represent information, so we
          should not be imposing that on our theories of the brain.
        • George
          ... After the singularity, your book will have already be written. George
          Message 4 of 4 , May 6, 2009
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            On Friday 01 May 2009 18:33:21 Eray Ozkural wrote:
            > That the computation is analog can explain, among other things, that
            > we never see pixels :D
            >
            > I know it sounds silly, as I usually don't consider theses from
            > introspection, but give it some thought and you will see what I mean.
            > I want to make this a small section of my philosophy book that I plan
            > to write after Singularity.
            >
            > Cheers,

            After the singularity, your book will have already be written.

            George
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