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Re: [agileDatabases] unit testing framework(s) for SQL Server 200x

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  • Brad Stiles
    ... For testing the DB, I use the FitNesse/DbFit combination. I guess it s not unit testing of the purest form, but it does serve to test my database, which
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 25 5:23 AM
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      > Curious to know what unit-testing framework(s) you use on SQL Server, and how.  I am tasked
      > with setting our corporate standard, and I'd like to get an understanding of the existing landscape.

      For testing the DB, I use the FitNesse/DbFit combination. I guess
      it's not "unit testing" of the purest form, but it does serve to test
      my database, which mostly involves testing stored procedures.

      /bs
    • alexander_karmanov
      DBFit does the work for me - it s not only for sql server. Much easier than writing the code. http://gojko.net/fitnesse/dbfit/ HTH ak
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 25 5:45 AM
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        DBFit does the work for me - it's not only for sql server.
        Much easier than writing the code.

        http://gojko.net/fitnesse/dbfit/

        HTH
        ak

        --- In agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com, "Todd Carrico" <todd.carrico@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'm using a slightly altered version of t-sqlunit. It is native t-sql and uses naming convenstions for test suite naming grouping and execution, setup and teardown etc.
        >
        > it does an OK job, I don't like the fact that it has a footprint on the server.
        >
        > This is just for ms-sql.
        >
        > I've tried the db-pro (visual studio for database professionals) and found the t-sql facade over the .net testing framework a bit confusing, but it met my zero footprint desire, and had some better options for testing output.
        >
        > Interested in hearing what other folks are doing on this front.
        >
        > Tc
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        >
        > From: agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com <agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com>
        > To: agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com <agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tue Mar 24 12:22:49 2009
        > Subject: [agileDatabases] unit testing framework(s) for SQL Server 200x
        >
        >
        > Hi all:
        >
        > Curious to know what unit-testing framework(s) you use on SQL Server, and how. I am tasked with setting our corporate standard, and I'd like to get an understanding of the existing landscape.
        >
        > My first inclination is to create / acquire something that is SQL Server-native, so we don't have to train our database developers in .NET as well. I don't see much out there, which leads me to suspect that folks are either rolling their own unit tests without a framework (as I have historically done -- very time-consuming), wrapping their DAL and testing from the application level, or aren't bothering at all.
        >
        > If I end up building, I envision assertions, fixtures, a runner and (text-based) visual feedback/reporting. What non-obvious features would make such a tool compelling for you?
        >
        > Thanks;
        > Duncan
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Bayley, Alistair
        ... +1 for DbFit. I ve started using it instead of utPL/SQL, and so far it seems to be an improvement. And a plus is that the tests are readable/maintanable by
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 25 5:51 AM
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          > From: agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brad Stiles
          >
          > For testing the DB, I use the FitNesse/DbFit combination. I guess
          > it's not "unit testing" of the purest form, but it does serve to test
          > my database, which mostly involves testing stored procedures.

          +1 for DbFit. I've started using it instead of utPL/SQL, and so far it
          seems to be an improvement. And a plus is that the tests are
          readable/maintanable by our analysts. It seems to be able to do most of
          what I've used utPL/SQL for, and it's a lot less verbose.

          Alistair
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        • Milen Kovachev
          I third dbFit. It is the best out there. It utilizes Fit + Fitnesse which is mostly used as acceptance testing framework but for database it ends up being pure
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 25 6:01 AM
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            I third dbFit. It is the best out there. It utilizes Fit + Fitnesse which is
            mostly used as acceptance testing framework but for database it ends up
            being pure unit testing. You just have to learn a few fixture names, set up
            connections, and start building your test pages. No coding required if you
            don't count your SQL test statements. It works great with SQL Server.

            On Wed, Mar 25, 2009 at 8:51 AM, Bayley, Alistair <
            Alistair_Bayley@...> wrote:

            > > From: agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com<agileDatabases%40yahoogroups.com>
            > > [mailto:agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com<agileDatabases%40yahoogroups.com>]
            > On Behalf Of Brad Stiles
            >
            > >
            > > For testing the DB, I use the FitNesse/DbFit combination. I guess
            > > it's not "unit testing" of the purest form, but it does serve to test
            > > my database, which mostly involves testing stored procedures.
            >
            > +1 for DbFit. I've started using it instead of utPL/SQL, and so far it
            > seems to be an improvement. And a plus is that the tests are
            > readable/maintanable by our analysts. It seems to be able to do most of
            > what I've used utPL/SQL for, and it's a lot less verbose.
            >
            > Alistair
            > *****************************************************************
            > Confidentiality Note: The information contained in this message,
            > and any attachments, may contain confidential and/or privileged
            > material. It is intended solely for the person(s) or entity to
            > which it is addressed. Any review, retransmission, dissemination,
            > or taking of any action in reliance upon this information by
            > persons or entities other than the intended recipient(s) is
            > prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact the
            > sender and delete the material from any computer.
            > *****************************************************************
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Max Guernsey, III
            It was recommended that I chime in even though some might see it as shameless self-promotion. I use NUnit and DataConstructor together. Max Guernsey, III
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 25 9:06 PM
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              It was recommended that I chime in even though some might see it as
              shameless self-promotion. I use NUnit and DataConstructor together.



              Max Guernsey, III

              Managing Member, Hexagon Software

              <http://www.hexsw.com/> http://www.hexsw.com

              <http://www.dataconstructor.com/> http://www.dataconstructor.com



              From: agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com [mailto:agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of alexander_karmanov
              Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 5:46 AM
              To: agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [agileDatabases] Re: unit testing framework(s) for SQL Server 200x



              DBFit does the work for me - it's not only for sql server.
              Much easier than writing the code.

              http://gojko.net/fitnesse/dbfit/

              HTH
              ak

              --- In agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:agileDatabases%40yahoogroups.com> , "Todd Carrico"
              <todd.carrico@...> wrote:
              >
              > I'm using a slightly altered version of t-sqlunit. It is native t-sql and
              uses naming convenstions for test suite naming grouping and execution, setup
              and teardown etc.
              >
              > it does an OK job, I don't like the fact that it has a footprint on the
              server.
              >
              > This is just for ms-sql.
              >
              > I've tried the db-pro (visual studio for database professionals) and found
              the t-sql facade over the .net testing framework a bit confusing, but it met
              my zero footprint desire, and had some better options for testing output.
              >
              > Interested in hearing what other folks are doing on this front.
              >
              > Tc
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              >
              > From: agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:agileDatabases%40yahoogroups.com> <agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:agileDatabases%40yahoogroups.com> >
              > To: agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:agileDatabases%40yahoogroups.com> <agileDatabases@yahoogroups.com
              <mailto:agileDatabases%40yahoogroups.com> >
              > Sent: Tue Mar 24 12:22:49 2009
              > Subject: [agileDatabases] unit testing framework(s) for SQL Server 200x
              >
              >
              > Hi all:
              >
              > Curious to know what unit-testing framework(s) you use on SQL Server, and
              how. I am tasked with setting our corporate standard, and I'd like to get an
              understanding of the existing landscape.
              >
              > My first inclination is to create / acquire something that is SQL
              Server-native, so we don't have to train our database developers in .NET as
              well. I don't see much out there, which leads me to suspect that folks are
              either rolling their own unit tests without a framework (as I have
              historically done -- very time-consuming), wrapping their DAL and testing
              from the application level, or aren't bothering at all.
              >
              > If I end up building, I envision assertions, fixtures, a runner and
              (text-based) visual feedback/reporting. What non-obvious features would make
              such a tool compelling for you?
              >
              > Thanks;
              > Duncan
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Dennis Lloyd Jr
              I use tSQLt. It is a native T-SQL unit testing framework for SQL Server 2005. The key features allow you to isolate different pieces of code. For example, if
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 27 9:07 AM
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                I use tSQLt. It is a native T-SQL unit testing framework for SQL Server
                2005. The key features allow you to isolate different pieces of code. For
                example, if you have a view you want to test, and that view uses several
                tables with FKs to several other tables, then the ability to put data into
                those underlying tables becomes increasingly complex. tSQLt introduces the
                concept of FakeTables (and some other fake object types) which allow you to
                isolate the unit under test. You can find more about it at
                http://www.sqlity.net/sqlity/articles/tSQLtTutorial

                If you like these features, but still need to write tests for SQL 2000,
                there are some extensions for TSQLUnit which you can read about here:
                http://www.sqlity.net/sqlity/articles/DbTDD

                If you decide to use or experiment with these, let me know - I would like to
                hear any feedback on the project.
                Cheers!
                -Dennis

                On Tue, Mar 24, 2009 at 1:22 PM, thatguyduncan <thatguyduncan@...>wrote:

                > Hi all:
                >
                > Curious to know what unit-testing framework(s) you use on SQL Server, and
                > how. I am tasked with setting our corporate standard, and I'd like to get an
                > understanding of the existing landscape.
                >
                > My first inclination is to create / acquire something that is SQL
                > Server-native, so we don't have to train our database developers in .NET as
                > well. I don't see much out there, which leads me to suspect that folks are
                > either rolling their own unit tests without a framework (as I have
                > historically done -- very time-consuming), wrapping their DAL and testing
                > from the application level, or aren't bothering at all.
                >
                > If I end up building, I envision assertions, fixtures, a runner and
                > (text-based) visual feedback/reporting. What non-obvious features would make
                > such a tool compelling for you?
                >
                > Thanks;
                > Duncan
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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