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RE: [agile-usability] Re: Customer vs user

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  • Desilets, Alain
    just about everyone I know in that community considers the customer to be the person who is making the purchase, the one who recommends or makes the purchase
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 1, 2004
      Message
      just about everyone I know in that community considers the customer to be the person who is making the purchase, the one who recommends or makes the purchase decision and/or authorizes the purchase expense.
       
      -- Alain:
      In an in-house development setting, the customer could also be the person who commisionned the system to be built.
      ----
       
      Regardless of our desires to design for the user, the Golden Rule ("them that has the gold makes the rules") specifies that the customer is always right, no matter how wrong. As a professional, I have a responsibility to educate and communicate when I think that customer may be making an error but if I'm taking their money, I'm going to do as they ask. 
       
      -- Alain:
      Very concisely and eloquently put.
      ---- 
    • Dan Rawsthorne
      Just my $02. Users are those that actually use the software Clients are those that pay us some money Customers are those *on my team* that speak for the users
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 1, 2004
        Message
        Just my $02.
          Users are those that actually use the software
          Clients are those that pay us some money
          Customers are those *on my team* that speak for the users and clients
         
        Dan  ;-)

        Dan Rawsthorne, PhD, Sr. Consultant
        www.netobjectives.com
        DrDan@...
        office:
        425-269-8628

        Net Objectives' vision is effective software development without suffering. Our mission is to assist software development teams in accomplishing this through a combination of training and mentoring.

         


        From: Desilets, Alain [mailto:alain.desilets@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 2004 6:15 AM
        To: 'agile-usability@yahoogroups.com'
        Subject: RE: [agile-usability] Re: Customer vs user

        just about everyone I know in that community considers the customer to be the person who is making the purchase, the one who recommends or makes the purchase decision and/or authorizes the purchase expense.
         
        -- Alain:
        In an in-house development setting, the customer could also be the person who commisionned the system to be built.
        ----
         
        Regardless of our desires to design for the user, the Golden Rule ("them that has the gold makes the rules") specifies that the customer is always right, no matter how wrong. As a professional, I have a responsibility to educate and communicate when I think that customer may be making an error but if I'm taking their money, I'm going to do as they ask. 
         
        -- Alain:
        Very concisely and eloquently put.
        ---- 


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      • William Pietri
        Hi! Sorry for joining this thread late, but I was on vacation. ... Two small notes: First, I suspect that this use of customer comes from TQM jargon:
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 3, 2004
          Hi! Sorry for joining this thread late, but I was on vacation.

          On Wed, 2004-12-01 at 09:48 +1300, Keith Nicholas wrote:
          > I've never liked "customer" as the name for the role in XP. But its
          > hard to come up with a better word.

          Two small notes:

          First, I suspect that this use of "customer" comes from TQM jargon:

          http://quality.org/TQM-MSI/TQM-glossary.html

          I was exposed to this when the University of Michigan's Information
          Technology Division went through a TQM phase. My recollection is hazy,
          but I'm pretty sure the TQM experts involved in that had some sort of
          history with Chrysler.


          Second, I avoid using the term "customer" except with people already
          steeped in XP; because "customer" already has a common meaning, it can
          be confusing.

          Generally the term I use is "product manager". I like this because it
          puts the focus on what we are doing -- making a product for others to
          use. In contrast, terms like "project manager" and "development manager"
          focus more on the methods we use in pursuit of the goal.

          William

          --
          William Pietri <william@...>
        • Charlie Trainor
          I m happy with the term Customer , but if you don t like that I suggest the Scrum role Product Owner . In different situations this might be a Product
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 4, 2004
            I'm happy with the term "Customer", but if you don't like that
            I suggest the Scrum role "Product Owner". In different situations
            this might be a Product Manager, an end user, a business expert,
            or even a committee - whoever makes the decisions on what the
            development team builds.

            Currently I'm playing the Product Owner role, even though there
            is also someone with the title of Product Manager, various
            business experts, partners, end users, and other stakeholders.
            I seek input from all of them, and some of them have a lot of
            influence over me, but in the end I'm the single hand on the
            development team's steering wheel.

            Since this is an agile usability list - but I've lost track of the
            original post that started all this - I'll just point out that
            Product Owners need to be able to weigh the costs and benefits of
            usability-related activities, just like other development activities.
            If there is a usability professional available, that person
            would be one of the experts providing input into the decision
            making process. The biggest risk (for me currently, but also
            quite a common problem) is not getting enough feedback from
            end users. But at least it is clear that it will be my fault
            if the usability of the product isn't up to scratch - we can't
            point fingers at each other and wonder who was supposed to
            worry about it.

            - Charlie

            William Pietry wrote:

            > Second, I avoid using the term "customer" except with people already
            > steeped in XP; because "customer" already has a common
            > meaning, it can be confusing.
            >
            > Generally the term I use is "product manager". I like this
            > because it
            > puts the focus on what we are doing -- making a product for
            > others to
            > use. In contrast, terms like "project manager" and
            > "development manager"
            > focus more on the methods we use in pursuit of the goal.
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