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Re: [agile-usability] tool for collating user feedback

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  • Daniel Naumann
    Hi Adam, My preference is always a big wall and a truck load of post-it notes. People can stand in front and discuss, move things, etc. It often captures
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 18, 2012
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      Hi Adam,

      My preference is always a big wall and a truck load of post-it notes. People can stand in front and discuss, move things, etc. It often captures passerby's attention too which is great for sharing within a company.

      I find software tools obscure the big picture themes because you can only view a few granular findings at a time. However anything that allows coding ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coding_(social_sciences) ) would be a good first step. Excel is the only thing I've used to achieve this so far (well there was some internal software at one place but obviously that won't help you).

      Cheers,
      Dan.

      On 18 April 2012 08:08, Adam <adamjclarkson@...> wrote:
       

      Hi group,

      What tools do people use for collecting, organizing and analyzing qualitative research?

      I'm looking for something for our organization that product and design teams could use to summarize and input findings from user research sessions: interviews, user testing, etc.

      But maybe there's a tool out there that we could open up to others in our organization, eg. sales and marketing, who are constantly talking to people and gathering feedback, important notes about customers.

      Thoughts?




      --
      Cheers,
      Dan.
    • Justin Tauber
      This just came up on UX Booth. It s a great technique for programmatically analyzing card sorting results, which are pretty hard to analyze by hand without
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 18, 2012
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        This just came up on UX Booth.

        It's a great technique for programmatically analyzing card sorting results, which are pretty hard to analyze by hand without falling into confirmation bias. Uses excel and a freely available statistical analysis program called "R".

        http://www.uxbooth.com/blog/open-card-sort-analysis-101/

        - Justin

        On 18 April 2012 17:00, Daniel Naumann <danielnaumann@...> wrote:
         

        Hi Adam,


        My preference is always a big wall and a truck load of post-it notes. People can stand in front and discuss, move things, etc. It often captures passerby's attention too which is great for sharing within a company.

        I find software tools obscure the big picture themes because you can only view a few granular findings at a time. However anything that allows coding ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coding_(social_sciences) ) would be a good first step. Excel is the only thing I've used to achieve this so far (well there was some internal software at one place but obviously that won't help you).

        Cheers,
        Dan.


        On 18 April 2012 08:08, Adam <adamjclarkson@...> wrote:
         

        Hi group,

        What tools do people use for collecting, organizing and analyzing qualitative research?

        I'm looking for something for our organization that product and design teams could use to summarize and input findings from user research sessions: interviews, user testing, etc.

        But maybe there's a tool out there that we could open up to others in our organization, eg. sales and marketing, who are constantly talking to people and gathering feedback, important notes about customers.

        Thoughts?




        --
        Cheers,
        Dan.




        --
        "If I have seen deeper, it's for being stood on the shoulders by giants"
        - John Haugeland, with apologies to Isaac Newton

      • Phil
        There s a free tool I use to analyse and organise transcripts of interviews called Weft QDA (http://www.pressure.to/qda/)
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 18, 2012
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          There's a free tool I use to analyse and organise transcripts of interviews called Weft QDA (http://www.pressure.to/qda/)

          --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, "Adam" <adamjclarkson@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi group,
          >
          > What tools do people use for collecting, organizing and analyzing qualitative research?
          >
          > I'm looking for something for our organization that product and design teams could use to summarize and input findings from user research sessions: interviews, user testing, etc.
          >
          > But maybe there's a tool out there that we could open up to others in our organization, eg. sales and marketing, who are constantly talking to people and gathering feedback, important notes about customers.
          >
          > Thoughts?
          >
        • Adrian Howard
          ... Index cards and post-it notes mainly :-) ... I ve not used it myself for a live project, but http://getreframer.com/ might fit the bill. Cheers, Adrian --
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 18, 2012
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            On 17 Apr 2012, at 23:08, Adam wrote:

            > What tools do people use for collecting, organizing and analyzing qualitative research?

            Index cards and post-it notes mainly :-)

            > I'm looking for something for our organization that product and design teams could use to summarize and input findings from user research sessions: interviews, user testing, etc.

            I've not used it myself for a live project, but http://getreframer.com/ might fit the bill.

            Cheers,

            Adrian
            --
            http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
            t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh
          • Austin Govella
            I ve used reframer for a live project, and I liked it. It lets you use tags to automate affinitization. Very handy. And I think it revealed/surfaced
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 18, 2012
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              I've used reframer for a live project, and I liked it. It lets you use tags to automate affinitization. Very handy. And I think it revealed/surfaced observations I may have been slower to realize had I not used it.



              --
              Austin Govella
              User Experience



              Catch me at a conference:

              May 31-Jun 2 - Big Design in Dallas
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              * http://bigdesignevents.com/sessions/ux-army-field-guide

              My book: 'Information Architecture: Blueprints for the web', 2nd ed.:
              * http://www.amazon.com/dp/0321600800/

              My Work: http://www.agux.co
              My Blog: http://www.thinkingandmaking.com

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