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Re: Apple's App Store UI, is it control or just bad design?

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  • joshseiden
    Interesting. And while I don t really disagree with your audit conclusions, I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 26, 2012
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      Interesting. And while I don't really disagree with your audit conclusions, I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in sales in the past QUARTER. (http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/apple-pwned/).

      It's hard to argue that a property running these kinds of numbers has a significant problem. I'm interested in how the members of this group would approach this.

      I guess you could argue that since it contributed less than 5% of Apple's total revenue, it is underperforming. Still, that's not an obvious case is it?

      JS

      --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, Robin Dymond <robin.dymond@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have written a blog on Apples App Store, after getting frustrated at its
      > design on multiple occasions.
    • Adrian Howard
      ... I ve not got any insight into how the app store was designed, but it s always seemed very focussed on casual purchases to me. Lots of top-tens, socal proof
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 26, 2012
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        On 26 Jan 2012, at 19:57, joshseiden wrote:

        > Interesting. And while I don't really disagree with your audit conclusions, I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in sales in the past QUARTER. (http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/apple-pwned/).

        I've not got any insight into how the app store was designed, but it's always seemed very focussed on casual purchases to me. Lots of top-tens, socal proof type things.

        I've no idea if I'm a typical user - but I've noticed two patterns:

        1) I've *never* gone to the app store with a general idea of a type of application that I want, and then searched the app store for it. I've always come to the app store via a google search, or link from a blog, or a link from an application-specific web site.

        2) When I'm using the app store I often go "ohhh shiny" and install something random that I had no idea existed until I visited. The top tens, review structure, etc. make that easy.

        I've no idea if that usage pattern was designed, or is an accidental byproduct of the lack of fine grained product/category browsing/search on the store.... it does seem to be effective though.

        Adrian
        --
        http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
        t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh
      • mark schraad
        The focus of both the store and the application is to find music, buy it and then play it. To that end, it works great. There are a lot of things it does not
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 26, 2012
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          The focus of both the store and the application is to find music, buy it and then play it. To that end, it works great. There are a lot of things it does not do towards organizing and managing music (that I wish it would). Maybe there is an opportunity there. Maybe it would be better if apple opened it up for plug ins or third party integration. But my guess is that it is doing just fine from a profitability perspective.




          On Thu, Jan 26, 2012 at 2:26 PM, Adrian Howard <adrianh@...> wrote:
           


          On 26 Jan 2012, at 19:57, joshseiden wrote:

          > Interesting. And while I don't really disagree with your audit conclusions, I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in sales in the past QUARTER. (http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/apple-pwned/).

          I've not got any insight into how the app store was designed, but it's always seemed very focussed on casual purchases to me. Lots of top-tens, socal proof type things.

          I've no idea if I'm a typical user - but I've noticed two patterns:

          1) I've *never* gone to the app store with a general idea of a type of application that I want, and then searched the app store for it. I've always come to the app store via a google search, or link from a blog, or a link from an application-specific web site.

          2) When I'm using the app store I often go "ohhh shiny" and install something random that I had no idea existed until I visited. The top tens, review structure, etc. make that easy.

          I've no idea if that usage pattern was designed, or is an accidental byproduct of the lack of fine grained product/category browsing/search on the store.... it does seem to be effective though.

          Adrian
          --
          http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
          t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh


        • Michael James
          ... Agree that would be a tough case to make. I d probably point out that Steve Jobs killed Apple s top selling product, the iPod Mini, to focus on developing
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 26, 2012
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            On Jan 26, 2012, at 11:57 AM, joshseiden wrote:

            > I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in sales in the past QUARTER. (http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/apple-pwned/).

            Agree that would be a tough case to make. I'd probably point out that Steve Jobs killed Apple's top selling product, the iPod Mini, to focus on developing the iPhone. From the information available at that time, a typical weathervane PO or green eyeshade committee would have seen this as a stupid thing to do.

            --mj
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