Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Apple's App Store UI, is it control or just bad design?

Expand Messages
  • Robin Dymond
    I have written a blog on Apples App Store, after getting frustrated at its design on multiple occasions. Apple s App Store A Little Shop of User Interface
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 23, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      I have written a blog on Apples App Store, after getting frustrated at its design on multiple occasions.

      Apple's App Store "A Little Shop of User Interface Horrors" bit.ly/AtHjii #Apple #iTunes #iOS #UCD #UX

      I'd be interested to hear thoughts about the article and the topic.

      cheers,
      Robin.

      Robin Dymond, CST
      Managing Partner, Innovel, LLC.
      www.innovel.net
      www.scrumtraining.com
      Americas: (804) 239-4329
      Europe: +32 489 674 366
      twitter: @robindymond
      Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/leanagileexecutive

    • Larry Constantine
      I now rarely browse or search within any app or site unless forced to. Google is my agile goto tool for almost everything. Googling keyboard apps for ipad
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 24, 2012
      • 0 Attachment

        I now rarely browse or search within any app or site unless forced to. Google is my agile goto tool for almost everything. Googling “keyboard apps for ipad” gives a mostly right-on first results page in .22 seconds that includes the following gems among the first 6 entries:

         

        http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/196571/keyboard_upgrade_app_offers_ipad_keyboard_options.html

        http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/19/ipad-apps-tweaking-the-keyboard/

        http://www.maclife.com/article/gallery/8_alternate_ios_keyboard_apps

         

        Despite its vaunted reputation for user-centered interaction design, Apple is really about MARKETING design and always has been, hence all the Apple selected lists and promos. The iTunes Store is a pain for almost any purpose, and its insistence on resorting lists and reshuffling displays after every drill-down for detail is very poor user experience. Their designers and programmers ought to know better but don’t seem to.

         

        --Larry Constantine, IDSA, ACM Fellow | Lior Samson, novelist

          Institute Fellow, Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute | www.m-iti.org

          Professor, University of Madeira | www.uma.pt

          Chief Scientist, Constantine & Lockwood Ltd

         

         

        From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robin Dymond
        Sent: Monday, January 23, 2012 08:59
        To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [agile-usability] Apple's App Store UI, is it control or just bad design?

         

         

        I have written a blog on Apples App Store, after getting frustrated at its design on multiple occasions.

        Apple's App Store "A Little Shop of User Interface Horrors" bit.ly/AtHjii #Apple #iTunes #iOS #UCD #UX

        I'd be interested to hear thoughts about the article and the topic.

        cheers,
        Robin.

        Robin Dymond, CST
        Managing Partner, Innovel, LLC.
        www.innovel.net
        www.scrumtraining.com
        Americas: (804) 239-4329
        Europe: +32 489 674 366
        twitter: @robindymond
        Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/leanagileexecutive

      • Michael James
        Apple s approach to UI may have actually *regressed* since they published their human interface guidelines in the 80s. I buy the stuff because I got fed up
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 25, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Apple's approach to UI may have actually *regressed* since they published their human interface guidelines in the 80s.  I buy the stuff because I got fed up with Linux driver issues and configuring XFree86.  The touchscreens and touchpad gestures are certainly nice but I think we've barely scratched the surface of what's possible if someone were to take a radically different view of all this.  Maybe such an inventor is reading this right now?

          --mj

          On Jan 24, 2012, at 4:18 AM, Larry Constantine wrote:

           

          I now rarely browse or search within any app or site unless forced to. Google is my agile goto tool for almost everything. Googling “keyboard apps for ipad” gives a mostly right-on first results page in .22 seconds that includes the following gems among the first 6 entries:

           

          http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/196571/keyboard_upgrade_app_offers_ipad_keyboard_options.html

          http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/19/ipad-apps-tweaking-the-keyboard/

          http://www.maclife.com/article/gallery/8_alternate_ios_keyboard_apps

           

          Despite its vaunted reputation for user-centered interaction design, Apple is really about MARKETING design and always has been, hence all the Apple selected lists and promos. The iTunes Store is a pain for almost any purpose, and its insistence on resorting lists and reshuffling displays after every drill-down for detail is very poor user experience. Their designers and programmers ought to know better but don’t seem to.

           

          --Larry Constantine, IDSA, ACM Fellow | Lior Samson, novelist

            Institute Fellow, Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute | www.m-iti.org

            Professor, University of Madeira | www.uma.pt

            Chief Scientist, Constantine & Lockwood Ltd

           

           

          From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robin Dymond
          Sent: Monday, January 23, 2012 08:59
          To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [agile-usability] Apple's App Store UI, is it control or just bad design?

           

           

          I have written a blog on Apples App Store, after getting frustrated at its design on multiple occasions.

          Apple's App Store "A Little Shop of User Interface Horrors" bit.ly/AtHjii #Apple #iTunes #iOS #UCD #UX

          I'd be interested to hear thoughts about the article and the topic.

          cheers,
          Robin.

          Robin Dymond, CST
          Managing Partner, Innovel, LLC.
          www.innovel.net
          www.scrumtraining.com
          Americas: (804) 239-4329
          Europe: +32 489 674 366
          twitter: @robindymond
          Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/leanagileexecutive



        • Robin Dymond
          Thanks for the thoughts Larry, and MJ. Larry I will checkout those links, thanks. I agree that Apple is a great marketing company. However I think that iTunes
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 25, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks for the thoughts Larry, and MJ. Larry I will checkout those links, thanks.

            I agree that Apple is a great marketing company. However I think that iTunes in particular has major structural and UI problems. The program started out as a jukebox application, and in subsequent releases has had very disparate functionality bolted onto it. The App Store interface is one example, but Movies and the unloved Internet Radio functionality also cause grief.

            I would like to see iTunes on the Mac broken up into multiple apps and/or web sites. The store functionality should be an ecommerce web site, and the iTunes player rethought, especially for video/dvd content, and ideally as a separate app.

            In 2000 I had a startup, Sensate Inc., and we created embedded software for networked audio devices. We wrote the software that could e used by Consumer Electronics companies to create iPod like devices. We had a different approach however, as we treated the PC as a smart server that would talk to the car, wireless headphones, cell phones, PCs etc. and treat each one differently with respect to the content served. The system was simple to use, transparent to users and it worked well. I guess it is similar to what iCloud is doing, although iour solution was local to the PC/Lan and did not require the internet connection to communicate with devices.

            At this point Apple seems to be planning to move everything onto their servers, probably to compete with Spotify. I like Spotify and SiriusXM however I don't want to lose access to my music/photos/docs because of an internet connection.

            cheers,
            Robin

            Robin Dymond, CST
            Managing Partner, Innovel, LLC.
            www.innovel.net
            www.scrumtraining.com
            Americas: (804) 239-4329
            Europe: +32 489 674 366
            twitter: @robindymond
            Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/leanagileexecutive



            On Wed, Jan 25, 2012 at 3:26 AM, Michael James <mj4scrum@...> wrote:
             

            Apple's approach to UI may have actually *regressed* since they published their human interface guidelines in the 80s.  I buy the stuff because I got fed up with Linux driver issues and configuring XFree86.  The touchscreens and touchpad gestures are certainly nice but I think we've barely scratched the surface of what's possible if someone were to take a radically different view of all this.  Maybe such an inventor is reading this right now?


            --mj


            On Jan 24, 2012, at 4:18 AM, Larry Constantine wrote:

             

            I now rarely browse or search within any app or site unless forced to. Google is my agile goto tool for almost everything. Googling “keyboard apps for ipad” gives a mostly right-on first results page in .22 seconds that includes the following gems among the first 6 entries:

             

            http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/196571/keyboard_upgrade_app_offers_ipad_keyboard_options.html

            http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/19/ipad-apps-tweaking-the-keyboard/

            http://www.maclife.com/article/gallery/8_alternate_ios_keyboard_apps

             

            Despite its vaunted reputation for user-centered interaction design, Apple is really about MARKETING design and always has been, hence all the Apple selected lists and promos. The iTunes Store is a pain for almost any purpose, and its insistence on resorting lists and reshuffling displays after every drill-down for detail is very poor user experience. Their designers and programmers ought to know better but don’t seem to.

             

            --Larry Constantine, IDSA, ACM Fellow | Lior Samson, novelist

              Institute Fellow, Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute | www.m-iti.org

              Professor, University of Madeira | www.uma.pt

              Chief Scientist, Constantine & Lockwood Ltd

             

             

            From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robin Dymond
            Sent: Monday, January 23, 2012 08:59
            To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [agile-usability] Apple's App Store UI, is it control or just bad design?

             

             

            I have written a blog on Apples App Store, after getting frustrated at its design on multiple occasions.

            Apple's App Store "A Little Shop of User Interface Horrors" bit.ly/AtHjii #Apple #iTunes #iOS #UCD #UX

            I'd be interested to hear thoughts about the article and the topic.

            cheers,
            Robin.

            Robin Dymond, CST
            Managing Partner, Innovel, LLC.
            www.innovel.net
            www.scrumtraining.com
            Americas: (804) 239-4329
            Europe: +32 489 674 366
            twitter: @robindymond
            Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/leanagileexecutive




          • Todd Zaki Warfel
            ... Why? Do you have any evidence that people are consuming video content in such a different way to warrant a separate application? Cheers! Todd -- Todd Zaki
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 26, 2012
            • 0 Attachment

              On Jan 25, 2012, at 6:57 AM, Robin Dymond wrote:

              I would like to see iTunes on the Mac broken up into multiple apps and/or web sites. The store functionality should be an ecommerce web site, and the iTunes player rethought, especially for video/dvd content, and ideally as a separate app.

              Why? 

              Do you have any evidence that people are consuming video content in such a different way to warrant a separate application? 



              Cheers!

              Todd

              --
              Todd Zaki Warfel

              tel. 
              +1 267 702 6170
              @zakiwarfel
              Skype: zakiwarfel


            • joshseiden
              Interesting. And while I don t really disagree with your audit conclusions, I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 26, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Interesting. And while I don't really disagree with your audit conclusions, I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in sales in the past QUARTER. (http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/apple-pwned/).

                It's hard to argue that a property running these kinds of numbers has a significant problem. I'm interested in how the members of this group would approach this.

                I guess you could argue that since it contributed less than 5% of Apple's total revenue, it is underperforming. Still, that's not an obvious case is it?

                JS

                --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, Robin Dymond <robin.dymond@...> wrote:
                >
                > I have written a blog on Apples App Store, after getting frustrated at its
                > design on multiple occasions.
              • Adrian Howard
                ... I ve not got any insight into how the app store was designed, but it s always seemed very focussed on casual purchases to me. Lots of top-tens, socal proof
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 26, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  On 26 Jan 2012, at 19:57, joshseiden wrote:

                  > Interesting. And while I don't really disagree with your audit conclusions, I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in sales in the past QUARTER. (http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/apple-pwned/).

                  I've not got any insight into how the app store was designed, but it's always seemed very focussed on casual purchases to me. Lots of top-tens, socal proof type things.

                  I've no idea if I'm a typical user - but I've noticed two patterns:

                  1) I've *never* gone to the app store with a general idea of a type of application that I want, and then searched the app store for it. I've always come to the app store via a google search, or link from a blog, or a link from an application-specific web site.

                  2) When I'm using the app store I often go "ohhh shiny" and install something random that I had no idea existed until I visited. The top tens, review structure, etc. make that easy.

                  I've no idea if that usage pattern was designed, or is an accidental byproduct of the lack of fine grained product/category browsing/search on the store.... it does seem to be effective though.

                  Adrian
                  --
                  http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
                  t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh
                • mark schraad
                  The focus of both the store and the application is to find music, buy it and then play it. To that end, it works great. There are a lot of things it does not
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 26, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    The focus of both the store and the application is to find music, buy it and then play it. To that end, it works great. There are a lot of things it does not do towards organizing and managing music (that I wish it would). Maybe there is an opportunity there. Maybe it would be better if apple opened it up for plug ins or third party integration. But my guess is that it is doing just fine from a profitability perspective.




                    On Thu, Jan 26, 2012 at 2:26 PM, Adrian Howard <adrianh@...> wrote:
                     


                    On 26 Jan 2012, at 19:57, joshseiden wrote:

                    > Interesting. And while I don't really disagree with your audit conclusions, I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in sales in the past QUARTER. (http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/apple-pwned/).

                    I've not got any insight into how the app store was designed, but it's always seemed very focussed on casual purchases to me. Lots of top-tens, socal proof type things.

                    I've no idea if I'm a typical user - but I've noticed two patterns:

                    1) I've *never* gone to the app store with a general idea of a type of application that I want, and then searched the app store for it. I've always come to the app store via a google search, or link from a blog, or a link from an application-specific web site.

                    2) When I'm using the app store I often go "ohhh shiny" and install something random that I had no idea existed until I visited. The top tens, review structure, etc. make that easy.

                    I've no idea if that usage pattern was designed, or is an accidental byproduct of the lack of fine grained product/category browsing/search on the store.... it does seem to be effective though.

                    Adrian
                    --
                    http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
                    t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh


                  • Michael James
                    ... Agree that would be a tough case to make. I d probably point out that Steve Jobs killed Apple s top selling product, the iPod Mini, to focus on developing
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 26, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      On Jan 26, 2012, at 11:57 AM, joshseiden wrote:

                      > I wonder how you would pitch this to a product owner who just generated $2B in sales in the past QUARTER. (http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/25/apple-pwned/).

                      Agree that would be a tough case to make. I'd probably point out that Steve Jobs killed Apple's top selling product, the iPod Mini, to focus on developing the iPhone. From the information available at that time, a typical weathervane PO or green eyeshade committee would have seen this as a stupid thing to do.

                      --mj
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.