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Re: [agile-usability] What's your definition of done?

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  • Adrian Howard
    Hi Justin, ... I think unpacking done like that can be harmful. It s making the feedback loop longer, so it makes it much harder to fix problems sooner. For
    Message 1 of 20 , Aug 19, 2011
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      Hi Justin,

      On 17 Aug 2011, at 16:59, Justin Tauber wrote:

      > Thanks for all the responses, they've been really useful.
      >
      > I get the impressions that there a few different concepts that need unpacking here:
      > * Done for an iteration vs done for a release
      > * Done as an internal standard prior to exposure to customers vs done from the perspective of the customer

      I think unpacking "done" like that can be harmful. It's making the feedback loop longer, so it makes it much harder to fix problems sooner.

      For example if a story is "done" for an iteration, but not "done" for a release - when do we figure out it's not really "done" for a release? How is putting off that level of "done" until later helping us?

      The relentless focus of good agile teams on done _really_ meaning done is a huge advantage for me and one I'd be reluctant to give up. It's the driver behind getting all necessary people involved with the project.

      > Though I can see how from both an agile and a ux perspective there shouldn't be a standard that isn't end user focused, from a practical perspective it's hard to learn from usability tests run on buggy software, so some "internal" standards need to be adopted. From that perspective, Jeff's definition of done looks like meaning "ready to expose to usability testing".

      Actually I think there's quite a lot the team can learn from usability testing buggy software ;-) I know I've learned include things like:

      * Participants don't notice a feature is buggy
      * Participants never use the buggy feature
      * Participants notice, but work around, the buggy feature
      * Participants see the bug as a feature

      all of which have interesting effects on how we might prioritise features and future work.

      Cheers,

      Adrian
      --
      http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
      t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh
    • Adrian Howard
      Hi Anders, On 17 Aug 2011, at 17:54, Anders Ramsay wrote: [snip] ... [snip] I think it depends on the particular way the debt metaphor is being used. If you re
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 19, 2011
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        Hi Anders,

        On 17 Aug 2011, at 17:54, Anders Ramsay wrote:
        [snip]
        > Defining something that has UX debt as Done means you'll be delivering a
        > half-baked UX, which goes to the core of the UX field's complaint about
        > Agile.
        >
        > IMO, there should be no such thing as UX debt. Either the quality of the
        > experience is appropriate for the product, context, and domain, or it is
        > not. (E.g. for an entertainment product, experience quality should likely
        > be very high, for an enterprise product, this may be less critical.)
        [snip]

        I think it depends on the particular way the debt metaphor is being used.

        If you're using it in the more general "debt is bad" sense then I agree completely. If you produce a poor UX, just like if you produce bad code, and don't care then your product is f*cked in anything but the short term.

        However the metaphor was originally a little bit more nuanced than that. It's more about how taking on a technical debt, and then paying it off later, can be the right thing to do in some circumstances - just like taking on a financial debt. There's a nice video from Ward on the topic here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqeJFYwnkjE (It's only 5mins long).

        Having debt is fine - if it's done in a mindful manner with the intent of paying the debt off.

        Cheers,

        Adrian
        --
        http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
        t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh
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