Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [agile-usability] [agile usability] Paper Prototyping

Expand Messages
  • Adrian Howard
    On 15 Aug 2011, at 04:17, wrote: [snip] ... I m going to niggle and say that if you re not using paper then what you re doing
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 15, 2011
      On 15 Aug 2011, at 04:17, <john@...> <john@...> wrote:
      [snip]
      > I changed the subject line, so this is no longer a thread-jacking :-)
      >
      > We use lots of things for paper prototyping. If the interface is not
      > too interactive, I'll use balsamiq mockups printed out and cut into
      > pieces. Sometimes we'll use a whiteboard and post-it notes -- in which
      > case the interface is all drawn larger-than-life. For more interactive
      > things, we are lucky enough to have a developer reporting to our UX team
      > whose entire job is to build prototypes for us. Of course, there are a
      > lot of us sharing him, so we don't always get access.

      I'm going to niggle and say that if you're not using paper then what you're doing is just plain old "prototyping" :-)

      > I'm happy to also recommend Carolyn Snyder's excellent book, "Paper
      > Prototyping" -- you can see the website at
      > http://www.paperprototyping.com/


      I second that recommendation.

      I'd also recommend Todd's "Prototyping: A Practitioner's Guide" (http://t.co/LjQS4Ie) as a good read. It has some good things to say about the different things you get out of prototyping at different levels of fidelity.

      Cheers,

      Adrian
      --
      http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
      t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh
    • Gene Arch
      Thanks John and Adrian! I ll check out those books! ________________________________ From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 15, 2011
        Thanks John and Adrian!  I'll check out those books!

        From: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com [mailto:agile-usability@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Adrian Howard
        Sent: Monday, August 15, 2011 2:57 AM
        To: agile-usability@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [agile-usability] [agile usability] Paper Prototyping

         


        On 15 Aug 2011, at 04:17, <john@...> <john@...> wrote:
        [snip]

        > I
        changed the subject line, so this is no longer a thread-jacking :-)
        >
        > We use lots of things for paper prototyping. If the interface is not
        > too interactive, I'll use balsamiq mockups printed out and cut into
        > pieces. Sometimes we'll use a whiteboard and post-it notes -- in which
        > case the interface is all drawn larger-than-life. For more interactive
        > things, we are lucky enough to have a developer reporting to our UX
        team
        > whose entire job is to build prototypes for us. Of course, there
        are a
        > lot of us sharing him, so we don't always get access.

        I'm going to niggle and say that if you're not using paper then what you're doing is just plain old "prototyping" :-)

        > I'm happy to also recommend Carolyn
        Snyder's excellent book, "Paper
        > Prototyping" -- you can see the website
        at
        >
        href="http://www.paperprototyping.com/">http://www.paperprototyping.com/

        I second that recommendation.

        I'd also recommend Todd's "Prototyping: A Practitioner's Guide" (http://t.co/LjQS4Ie) as a good read. It has some good things to say about the different things you get out of prototyping at different levels of fidelity.

        Cheers,

        Adrian
        --
        http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
        t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh

      • desireesy
        ... not ... which ... interactive ... team ... are a ... you re doing is just plain old prototyping :-) ... prototyping. That is, we aim for the lowest
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 15, 2011
          John Schrag:
          > > We use lots of things for paper prototyping. If the interface is not
          > > too interactive, I'll use balsamiq mockups printed out and cut into
          > > pieces. Sometimes we'll use a whiteboard and post-it notes -- in which
          > > case the interface is all drawn larger-than-life. For more interactive
          > > things, we are lucky enough to have a developer reporting to our UX team
          > > whose entire job is to build prototypes for us. Of course, there are a
          > > lot of us sharing him, so we don't always get access.

          Adrian Howard:
          > I'm going to niggle and say that if you're not using paper then what you're doing is just plain old "prototyping" :-)

          :)  What John's describing is what I call "minimum-fidelity prototyping."  That is, we aim for the lowest possible fidelity of interactive prototype to make the relevant design decision.

          > I'd also recommend Todd's "Prototyping: A Practitioner's Guide" (http://t.co/LjQS4Ie) as a good read. It has 
          > some good things to say about the different things you get out of prototyping at different levels of fidelity.

          Just to bring this full circle, the webinar version of Todd's book is available from Jared's company:

          http://www.uie.com/events/virtual_seminars/pt_practitioner/

          -Desirée
        • Adrian Howard
          Hi Desirée! On 15 Aug 2011, at 20:25, desireesy wrote: [snip] ... [snip] Being extra niggly - I d maybe rephrase the goal of lowest possible fidelity of as
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 16, 2011
            Hi Desirée!

            On 15 Aug 2011, at 20:25, desireesy wrote:
            [snip]
            > :) What John's describing is what I call "minimum-fidelity prototyping." That is, we aim for the lowest possible fidelity of interactive prototype to make the relevant design decision.
            [snip]

            Being extra niggly - I'd maybe rephrase the goal of "lowest possible fidelity of" as "fastest feedback from an"?

            That often does mean the lowest possible fidelity - but not always. I've worked for two clients where I had to point out that the "low-fi" prototypes the design team were testing for various UI tweaks were taking longer to build than the final implementation...

            Cheers,

            Adrian
            --
            http://quietstars.com adrianh@... twitter.com/adrianh
            t. +44 (0)7752 419080 skype adrianjohnhoward del.icio.us/adrianh
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.