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Re: Real data

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  • davenicolette
    ... There are surely many poor outcomes in IT. I recall reading reports from Gartner or Forrester (or some such) several years ago that found quite a high rate
    Message 1 of 218 , Feb 1, 2010
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      --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, "Glen B. Alleman" <glen.alleman@...> wrote:
      >
      > I would agree in some cases. But I've watched a major health insurance firm
      > here "explode" and have to get bought by an even larger firm, because of the
      > complete failure of the claims payment system.
      >
      > G
      >

      There are surely many poor outcomes in IT. I recall reading reports from Gartner or Forrester (or some such) several years ago that found quite a high rate of failed or questionable IT projects. What the studies don't tell us is the reasons for failure. I suspect there are many ways to fail; there are more wrong ways than right ways to do anything.

      Dave
    • George Dinwiddie
      Hi, Jon, ... I ve never found creating software to be a one and only time no matter how small the program. There s a lot of similarity between writing one
      Message 218 of 218 , Feb 12, 2010
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        Hi, Jon,

        Jon Kern wrote:
        > ok, maybe it is silly to debate the term...
        >
        > George it's a free country, use method anytime you please :-)
        >
        > I personally will only use "method" when I want to describe some way
        > that I achieve something over and over. Often in an abstract sense,
        > often in a step-wise way. Often because the "something" is a desirous
        > end goal, and one that I (or someone else) wants more than one time.
        >
        > I would not describe the /ad hoc/ "how" of the one and only time I will
        > ever do something as a "method" if it is not.

        I've never found creating software to be a "one and only time" no matter
        how small the program. There's a lot of similarity between writing one
        line of code and writing the next.

        And I've observed, that people generally continue to do something
        somewhat in the fashion they've done it before. Thoughtful people will
        consider the result their achieving, and modify their actions to try to
        improve some aspect.

        I've never seen anyone continue to approach the work as if they'd never
        done anything like it before, choosing some completely different way of
        working. And I've never seen anyone carefully follow the recipe in a
        process manual. At best, a process manual gives the worker some ideas.

        It's the process people actually /do/ that has an effect. If you and
        Scott and Glen want to reserve the word "method" for officially blessed
        procedures, go right ahead. It won't change a thing.

        - George

        --
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
        Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
        Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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