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Re: [agile-usability] Linkedin Group on Agile and UX

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  • Tim Wright
    IT s a slightly different setup than that. The Agile PM has two teams that report to him (either through secondment from business or as their managers - we
    Message 1 of 18 , Jan 5, 2010
      IT's a slightly different setup than that. The Agile PM has two teams that report to him (either through secondment from business or as their managers - we don't do the matrix resourcing anymore). One is the development team and the other is the business experts team. The business experts act more like a customer or product owner.
       
      The project is measured (and the PM rewarded) by how well the project meets several "success sliders" and removes roadblocks that hinder the team achieving those measures - as well as identifying external (to the project) things that might impact the team.
      The sliders are:
       
      ¨ Objectives;
      ¨ Stakeholder satisfaction;
      ¨ Budget;
      ¨ Deadline;
      ¨ Added Value;
      ¨ Quality; and
      ¨ Team satisfaction.
       
       
      A short intro is here:
       

      Essentially, we're following Rod Tomsett's "Radical Project Management" that he later renamed "Agile Project Management".
       
       
      I should also mention that my organisation is currently restructing all project delivary around these lines - quite a move away from waterfall!

      Tim
       
      On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 11:53 AM, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
       

      Hello, Tim. On Tuesday, January 5, 2010, at 5:21:10 PM, you wrote:

      > In our organisation, Agile PMs are responsible for delivary of all "in
      > scope" project outputs. This is different to a scrummaster who is
      > responsible for effective functioning of the team (give or take a few
      > sterotypes). Typically, tho, the PM is an outward facing role who is always
      > talking to other PMs and stakeholders to clear the path for project success
      > and the scrummaster helps the team follow the path.

      In name-brand Agile that would be the product owner or customer
      role, and it requires domain knowledge and responsibility more than
      project management skill.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      www.xprogramming.com/blog
      Fatalism is born of the fear of failure, for we all believe that we carry
      success in our own hands, and we suspect that our hands are weak. -- Conrad


    • William Pietri
      ... Interesting. I m still a little unclear on what that person actually does. You mentioned previously that the project manager is responsible for delivery,
      Message 2 of 18 , Jan 5, 2010
        On 01/05/2010 06:20 PM, Tim Wright wrote:
        IT's a slightly different setup than that. The Agile PM has two teams that report to him (either through secondment from business or as their managers - we don't do the matrix resourcing anymore). One is the development team and the other is the business experts team. The business experts act more like a customer or product owner.
         
        The project is measured (and the PM rewarded) by how well the project meets several "success sliders" and removes roadblocks that hinder the team achieving those measures - as well as identifying external (to the project) things that might impact the team.

        Interesting. I'm still a little unclear on what that person actually does. You mentioned previously that the project manager is responsible for delivery, but in the fully Agile shops I'm familiar with, it's the team that is responsible.

        Just so I can understand their function better, what would happen if you didn't have the project manager? If you just had all of those people working as one team with common goals?

        William
      • Tim Wright
        To quote from http://www.bigvisible.com/gschlitz/passive-conduit/ (because Im tired after work :) I believe that one of the simplest and most effective things
        Message 3 of 18 , Jan 5, 2010
          To quote from http://www.bigvisible.com/gschlitz/passive-conduit/ (because Im tired after work :)

          "I believe that one of the simplest and most effective things an Agile project manager can do is, ironically, nothing!

          "Well, not really nothing. But none of the things mentioned above. The Agile PM should be a conduit of information, a “passive conduit” as Thomsett describes nicely in his excellent book. Instead of solving problems, focus on getting problems to the right people. For every challenge, risk and issue arises, spend your time communicating to those who need to know, those who are empowered and able to solve the challenge or issue, or who are affected by the risk."

          Tim

          On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 3:28 PM, William Pietri <william@...> wrote:
           

          On 01/05/2010 06:20 PM, Tim Wright wrote:
          IT's a slightly different setup than that. The Agile PM has two teams that report to him (either through secondment from business or as their managers - we don't do the matrix resourcing anymore). One is the development team and the other is the business experts team. The business experts act more like a customer or product owner.
           
          The project is measured (and the PM rewarded) by how well the project meets several "success sliders" and removes roadblocks that hinder the team achieving those measures - as well as identifying external (to the project) things that might impact the team.

          Interesting. I'm still a little unclear on what that person actually does. You mentioned previously that the project manager is responsible for delivery, but in the fully Agile shops I'm familiar with, it's the team that is responsible.

          Just so I can understand their function better, what would happen if you didn't have the project manager? If you just had all of those people working as one team with common goals?

          William

        • Glennette Clark
          Essentially, another name for a SCRUM master. Glennette ... -- Glennette Clark Lazy Smart Creative 202-683-9508 glennette@lazysmart.com UXCamp DC - Jan. 23,
          Message 4 of 18 , Jan 5, 2010
            Essentially, another name for a SCRUM master.

            Glennette

            On 1/5/10, Tim Wright <sambo.shacklock@...> wrote:
            > To quote from http://www.bigvisible.com/gschlitz/passive-conduit/ (because
            > Im tired after work :)
            >
            > "I believe that one of the simplest and most effective things an Agile
            > project manager can do is, ironically, nothing!
            >
            > "Well, not really *nothing*. But none of the things mentioned above. The
            > Agile PM should be a conduit of information, a “passive conduit” as Thomsett
            > describes nicely in his excellent book. Instead of solving problems, focus
            > on getting problems to the right people. For every challenge, risk and issue
            > arises, spend your time communicating to those who need to know, those who
            > are empowered and able to solve the challenge or issue, or who are affected
            > by the risk."
            >
            > Tim
            >
            > On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 3:28 PM, William Pietri <william@...> wrote:
            >
            >>
            >>
            >> On 01/05/2010 06:20 PM, Tim Wright wrote:
            >>
            >> IT's a slightly different setup than that. The Agile PM has two teams that
            >> report to him (either through secondment from business or as their
            >> managers
            >> - we don't do the matrix resourcing anymore). One is the development team
            >> and the other is the business experts team. The business experts act more
            >> like a customer or product owner.
            >>
            >> The project is measured (and the PM rewarded) by how well the project
            >> meets
            >> several "success sliders" and removes roadblocks that hinder the team
            >> achieving those measures - as well as identifying external (to the
            >> project)
            >> things that might impact the team.
            >>
            >>
            >> Interesting. I'm still a little unclear on what that person actually does.
            >> You mentioned previously that the project manager is responsible for
            >> delivery, but in the fully Agile shops I'm familiar with, it's the team
            >> that
            >> is responsible.
            >>
            >> Just so I can understand their function better, what would happen if you
            >> didn't have the project manager? If you just had all of those people
            >> working
            >> as one team with common goals?
            >>
            >> William
            >>
            >>
            >


            --
            Glennette Clark
            Lazy Smart Creative
            202-683-9508
            glennette@...

            UXCamp DC - Jan. 23, 2010 - http://uxbarcampdc.eventbrite.com
          • Marius van Dam
            They certainly do use LinkedIn: the group grew from 2 to 33 members in a few hours. My 2 cents on Agile Project Managers : I m a PM myself but essentially the
            Message 5 of 18 , Jan 6, 2010
              They certainly do use LinkedIn: the group grew from 2 to 33 members in a few hours.

              My 2 cents on 'Agile Project Managers':

              I'm a PM myself but essentially the PM model and the Agile model are different worlds. They are not necessarily incompatible though. A large project for a new online photo printing service could very well be managed using Prince2 (or similar) where different teams report to the project manager. The development of the supporting web app could be done using Scrum. While the set up of the photo printing facility is managed in a more traditional waterfall manner.

              Of course there is also another way by using the Scrum of Scrum, but I wonder if Scrum if fit for setting up a photo printing facility. 

              Anyhow in an Agile environment the traditional PM will have to adapt hence the term 'Agile Project Management/Manager'. (not sure if anyone has this on his business card though)

              Regards,

              Marius van Dam

              YouAreHere, weblog on UX+Agile - http://www.youarehere.nl

              2010/1/5 Jared Spool <jspool@...>
               


              On Jan 5, 2010, at 1:49 PM, William Pietri wrote:

              On 01/05/2010 05:21 AM, mariusvandam wrote:
              > [...] it's a subgroup of the 'Agile Project Managers' group. [...]
              > 

              This is a bit of a digression, but what does an Agile project manager do?

              Apparently, they use LinkedIn.

              Jared




              --
              Met vriendelijke groet,

              Marius van Dam
              ---
              mariusvandam@...
            • William Pietri
              Heh. I was going to say it sounds like what all agile team members should be doing, as well as any manager in an agile organization. I guess the actual
              Message 6 of 18 , Jan 6, 2010
                Heh. I was going to say it sounds like what all agile team members
                should be doing, as well as any manager in an agile organization.

                I guess the actual function of an agile project manager will have to
                remain a mystery to me for now, but my very tentative assumption is that
                it has something to do with bridging the gaps that appear in
                organizations that are more agile in some spots than others. Which is
                what you'd expect to find in larger or older organizations attempting
                transitions.

                Thanks for indulging the digression.

                William

                On 01/05/2010 08:56 PM, Glennette Clark wrote:
                > Essentially, another name for a SCRUM master.
                >
                > Glennette
                >
                > On 1/5/10, Tim Wright<sambo.shacklock@...> wrote:
                >
                >> To quote from http://www.bigvisible.com/gschlitz/passive-conduit/ (because
                >> Im tired after work :)
                >>
                >> "I believe that one of the simplest and most effective things an Agile
                >> project manager can do is, ironically, nothing!
                >>
                >> "Well, not really *nothing*. But none of the things mentioned above. The
                >> Agile PM should be a conduit of information, a “passive conduit” as Thomsett
                >> describes nicely in his excellent book. Instead of solving problems, focus
                >> on getting problems to the right people. For every challenge, risk and issue
                >> arises, spend your time communicating to those who need to know, those who
                >> are empowered and able to solve the challenge or issue, or who are affected
                >> by the risk."
                >>
                >> Tim
                >>
                >> On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 3:28 PM, William Pietri<william@...> wrote:
                >>
                >>
                >>>
                >>> On 01/05/2010 06:20 PM, Tim Wright wrote:
                >>>
                >>> IT's a slightly different setup than that. The Agile PM has two teams that
                >>> report to him (either through secondment from business or as their
                >>> managers
                >>> - we don't do the matrix resourcing anymore). One is the development team
                >>> and the other is the business experts team. The business experts act more
                >>> like a customer or product owner.
                >>>
                >>> The project is measured (and the PM rewarded) by how well the project
                >>> meets
                >>> several "success sliders" and removes roadblocks that hinder the team
                >>> achieving those measures - as well as identifying external (to the
                >>> project)
                >>> things that might impact the team.
                >>>
                >>>
                >>> Interesting. I'm still a little unclear on what that person actually does.
                >>> You mentioned previously that the project manager is responsible for
                >>> delivery, but in the fully Agile shops I'm familiar with, it's the team
                >>> that
                >>> is responsible.
                >>>
                >>> Just so I can understand their function better, what would happen if you
                >>> didn't have the project manager? If you just had all of those people
                >>> working
                >>> as one team with common goals?
                >>>
                >>> William
                >>>
                >>>
                >>>
                >>
                >
                >
              • Craig Davidson
                What do you call the SCRUM master when you are not doing SCRUM? ;-) 2010/1/6 Glennette Clark ... What do you call the SCRUM master when
                Message 7 of 18 , Jan 7, 2010
                  What do you call the SCRUM master when you are not doing SCRUM? ;-)

                  2010/1/6 Glennette Clark <glennette@...>
                  Essentially, another name for a SCRUM master.

                  Glennette

                  On 1/5/10, Tim Wright <sambo.shacklock@...> wrote:
                  > To quote from http://www.bigvisible.com/gschlitz/passive-conduit/ (because
                  > Im tired after work :)
                  >
                  > "I believe that one of the simplest and most effective things an Agile
                  > project manager can do is, ironically, nothing!
                  >
                  > "Well, not really *nothing*. But none of the things mentioned above. The
                  > Agile PM should be a conduit of information, a “passive conduit” as Thomsett
                  > describes nicely in his excellent book. Instead of solving problems, focus
                  > on getting problems to the right people. For every challenge, risk and issue
                  > arises, spend your time communicating to those who need to know, those who
                  > are empowered and able to solve the challenge or issue, or who are affected
                  > by the risk."
                  >
                  > Tim
                  >
                  > On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 3:28 PM, William Pietri <william@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> On 01/05/2010 06:20 PM, Tim Wright wrote:
                  >>
                  >> IT's a slightly different setup than that. The Agile PM has two teams that
                  >> report to him (either through secondment from business or as their
                  >> managers
                  >> - we don't do the matrix resourcing anymore). One is the development team
                  >> and the other is the business experts team. The business experts act more
                  >> like a customer or product owner.
                  >>
                  >> The project is measured (and the PM rewarded) by how well the project
                  >> meets
                  >> several "success sliders" and removes roadblocks that hinder the team
                  >> achieving those measures - as well as identifying external (to the
                  >> project)
                  >> things that might impact the team.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Interesting. I'm still a little unclear on what that person actually does.
                  >> You mentioned previously that the project manager is responsible for
                  >> delivery, but in the fully Agile shops I'm familiar with, it's the team
                  >> that
                  >> is responsible.
                  >>
                  >> Just so I can understand their function better, what would happen if you
                  >> didn't have the project manager? If you just had all of those people
                  >> working
                  >> as one team with common goals?
                  >>
                  >> William
                  >>
                  >>
                  >


                  --
                  Glennette Clark
                  Lazy Smart Creative
                  202-683-9508
                  glennette@...

                  UXCamp DC - Jan. 23, 2010 - http://uxbarcampdc.eventbrite.com


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                • Anders Ramsay
                  What you call yourself is usually only important if you don t know what you re doing. If you know what you re doing and/or are upfront about not knowing, that
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jan 7, 2010
                    What you call yourself is usually only important if you don't know what you're  doing. If you know what you're doing and/or are upfront about not knowing, that will speak louder than any titles you might give yourself. The people who are managing the project are the project managers, meaning someone else may very well have that title but isn't actually managing (or shepherding, facilitating, whatever) much of anything.  

                    Oh, and it's Scrum, not SCRUM (It's not an abbreviation.)

                    -Anders

                    Sent from my iPhone

                    On Jan 7, 2010, at 6:38 AM, Craig Davidson <craigmdavidson@...> wrote:

                     

                    What do you call the SCRUM master when you are not doing SCRUM? ;-)

                    2010/1/6 Glennette Clark <glennette@gmail. com>
                    Essentially, another name for a SCRUM master.

                    Glennette

                    On 1/5/10, Tim Wright <sambo.shacklock@gmail.com> wrote:
                    > To quote from http://www.bigvisib le.com/gschlitz/ passive-conduit/ (because
                    > Im tired after work :)
                    >
                    > "I believe that one of the simplest and most effective things an Agile
                    > project manager can do is, ironically, nothing!
                    >
                    > "Well, not really *nothing*. But none of the things mentioned above. The
                    > Agile PM should be a conduit of information, a “passive conduit” as Thomsett
                    > describes nicely in his excellent book. Instead of solving problems, focus
                    > on getting problems to the right people. For every challenge, risk and issue
                    > arises, spend your time communicating to those who need to know, those who
                    > are empowered and able to solve the challenge or issue, or who are affected
                    > by the risk."
                    >
                    > Tim
                    >
                    > On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 3:28 PM, William Pietri <william@scissor. com> wrote:
                    >
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> On 01/05/2010 06:20 PM, Tim Wright wrote:
                    >>
                    >> IT's a slightly different setup than that. The Agile PM has two teams that
                    >> report to him (either through secondment from business or as their
                    >> managers
                    >> - we don't do the matrix resourcing anymore). One is the development team
                    >> and the other is the business experts team. The business experts act more
                    >> like a customer or product owner.
                    >>
                    >> The project is measured (and the PM rewarded) by how well the project
                    >> meets
                    >> several "success sliders" and removes roadblocks that hinder the team
                    >> achieving those measures - as well as identifying external (to the
                    >> project)
                    >> things that might impact the team.
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Interesting. I'm still a little unclear on what that person actually does.
                    >> You mentioned previously that the project manager is responsible for
                    >> delivery, but in the fully Agile shops I'm familiar with, it's the team
                    >> that
                    >> is responsible.
                    >>
                    >> Just so I can understand their function better, what would happen if you
                    >> didn't have the project manager? If you just had all of those people
                    >> working
                    >> as one team with common goals?
                    >>
                    >> William
                    >>
                    >>
                    >


                    --
                    Glennette Clark
                    Lazy Smart Creative
                    202-683-9508
                    glennette@lazysmart .com

                    UXCamp DC - Jan. 23, 2010 - http://uxbarcampdc. eventbrite. com


                    ------------ --------- --------- ------

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                  • Glennette Clark
                    I suspect that you could call yourself an Agile project manager. I don t think that the duties, per se, are all that different it is just a matter of which
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jan 7, 2010
                      I suspect that you could call yourself an Agile project manager. I don't think that the duties, per se, are all that different it is just a matter of which agile methodology you choose to follow. Because I was trained as a SCRUM Master, that is what I called myself. I had another colleague who was not specifically trained in SCRUM who just referred to herself as a project manager. 

                      In my opinion, it is a matter of semantics and agile methodology.

                      Glennette

                      On Thu, Jan 7, 2010 at 4:37 PM, Anders Ramsay <andersr@...> wrote:
                       

                      What you call yourself is usually only important if you don't know what you're  doing. If you know what you're doing and/or are upfront about not knowing, that will speak louder than any titles you might give yourself. The people who are managing the project are the project managers, meaning someone else may very well have that title but isn't actually managing (or shepherding, facilitating, whatever) much of anything.  

                      Oh, and it's Scrum, not SCRUM (It's not an abbreviation.)

                      -Anders

                      Sent from my iPhone

                      On Jan 7, 2010, at 6:38 AM, Craig Davidson <craigmdavidson@...> wrote:

                       

                      What do you call the SCRUM master when you are not doing SCRUM? ;-)

                      2010/1/6 Glennette Clark <glennette@...>
                      Essentially, another name for a SCRUM master.

                      Glennette

                      On 1/5/10, Tim Wright <sambo.shacklock@gmail.com> wrote:
                      > To quote from http://www.bigvisible.com/gschlitz/passive-conduit/ (because
                      > Im tired after work :)
                      >
                      > "I believe that one of the simplest and most effective things an Agile
                      > project manager can do is, ironically, nothing!
                      >
                      > "Well, not really *nothing*. But none of the things mentioned above. The
                      > Agile PM should be a conduit of information, a “passive conduit” as Thomsett
                      > describes nicely in his excellent book. Instead of solving problems, focus
                      > on getting problems to the right people. For every challenge, risk and issue
                      > arises, spend your time communicating to those who need to know, those who
                      > are empowered and able to solve the challenge or issue, or who are affected
                      > by the risk."
                      >
                      > Tim
                      >
                      > On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 3:28 PM, William Pietri <william@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> On 01/05/2010 06:20 PM, Tim Wright wrote:
                      >>
                      >> IT's a slightly different setup than that. The Agile PM has two teams that
                      >> report to him (either through secondment from business or as their
                      >> managers
                      >> - we don't do the matrix resourcing anymore). One is the development team
                      >> and the other is the business experts team. The business experts act more
                      >> like a customer or product owner.
                      >>
                      >> The project is measured (and the PM rewarded) by how well the project
                      >> meets
                      >> several "success sliders" and removes roadblocks that hinder the team
                      >> achieving those measures - as well as identifying external (to the
                      >> project)
                      >> things that might impact the team.
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> Interesting. I'm still a little unclear on what that person actually does.
                      >> You mentioned previously that the project manager is responsible for
                      >> delivery, but in the fully Agile shops I'm familiar with, it's the team
                      >> that
                      >> is responsible.
                      >>
                      >> Just so I can understand their function better, what would happen if you
                      >> didn't have the project manager? If you just had all of those people
                      >> working
                      >> as one team with common goals?
                      >>
                      >> William
                      >>
                      >>
                      >


                      --
                      Glennette Clark
                      Lazy Smart Creative
                      202-683-9508
                      glennette@...

                      UXCamp DC - Jan. 23, 2010 - http://uxbarcampdc.eventbrite.com


                      ------------------------------------

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                      --
                      Glennette Clark
                      Lazy Smart Creative
                      202-683-9508
                      glennette@...

                      UXCamp DC - Jan. 23, 2010 - http://uxbarcampdc.eventbrite.com
                    • Jared Spool
                      ... Bored?
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jan 7, 2010

                        On Jan 7, 2010, at 6:38 AM, Craig Davidson wrote:

                        What do you call the SCRUM master when you are not doing SCRUM? ;-)

                        Bored?
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.