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Re: UX books for programmers

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  • hackerchick
    Thanks for posting this! I m also a programmer who s interested in building more usable applications. I feel like we re starting to see better design with
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 30, 2009
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      Thanks for posting this!  I'm also a programmer who's interested in building more usable applications.  I feel like we're starting to see better design with web sites and a lot of books on web usability, but it seems like most applications are still really lacking in this area. 

      I'm currently reading About Face 3, which seems a little wordier then necessary - but some very good stuff. I really like his distinction between implementation model (exposing the database structure :) ) vs. the user's mental models.  It does seem to be tailored to application GUIs, I'm not sure what about it would be web 2.0 specific per your question.

      I'll also check out Designing Interfaces and Designing the Obvious.   I know the latter is meant for web apps, but I wonder - with the newer development technologies like WPF and Adobe Air if the distinction between desktop applications & web applications is really starting to blur because we're not restricted to traditional windows conventions? 


      Abby
      --
      abby fichtner,
      http://TheHackerChickBlog.com
      --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, Robert Gravina <robert@...> wrote:
      >
      > 2009/12/7 Jeremy Kriegel jer@...
      > > I liked the way the first half of The Inmates are Running the Asylum humorously sets up how to approach this problem.
      >
      > Thanks. I think I need a laugh right about now :). Has anyone read
      > Coopers other book (About Face 3) - I've heard it's a bit of an
      > interaction design classic, and the UX people I've worked with in the
      > path seemed to be doing something like the Cooper method. Although the
      > book says it's relevant for "web 2.0 sites", it does seem to have a
      > GUI focus (based on the table of contents, Part III seems to be very
      > GUI focussed as it covers menus, toolbars, etc.).
      >
      > Can anyone comment? Is it still worth a read?
      >
      > Robert
      >
    • Nancy Frishberg
      On Dec 7, 2009, at 8:44 AM, Robert Gravina wrote: Catching up on my reading, and offering at least one slightly older work that I ve enjoyed and recommended:
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 12, 2010
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        On Dec 7, 2009, at 8:44 AM, Robert Gravina wrote:

        Catching up on my reading, and offering at least one slightly older
        work that I've enjoyed and recommended:

        Ellen Isaacs (http://izix.com/index.html) and Alan Walendowski's
        Designing from Both Side of the Screen. They walk through the
        interaction between user-centered design activities (by the designer
        and with users & customers) and the developer, who likely has greater
        knowledge of the possibilities and limitations of the chosen
        technology. Plus they talk about developing for 2 delivery platforms
        (PC & mobile) at once.

        http://www.amazon.com/Designing-Both-Sides-Screen-Collaborate/dp/0672321513/
        (and wow! I'm surprised that the price has held or gone up!)
        -- Nancy

        Nancy Frishberg +1 650 804 5800 mobile
        nancyf@...
      • Robert Gravina
        2009/12/30 hackerchick   I ll also check out Designing Interfaces and Designing the Obvious.   I know the latter is meant for web
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 12, 2010
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          2009/12/30 hackerchick <haxrchick@...>
           > I'll also check out Designing Interfaces and Designing the Obvious.
            I know the latter is meant for web apps, but I wonder - with the
          newer development technologies like WPF and Adobe Air if the
          distinction between desktop applications & web applications is really
          starting to blur because we're not restricted to traditional windows
          conventions?

          I read through Designing Interfaces over a week or so and found it
          *excellent* and was just what I was looking for. The main reason for
          this is that the author has created a catalouge of patterns for UIs
          spanning web, desktop and mobile, much like we have design patterns
          for software. I feel like now I can look at a UI problem and have
          somewhere to start, and know of examples of real-world applications
          which tackle the same problem (or similar problems) in similar ways. I
          feel one step closer to being able to create great interfaces, and not
          just recognise them. It's a good book... thanks to Tim for
          recommending it!

          Robert
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