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Re: [agile-usability] Role of the Business/System Analyst

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  • Chris Morris
    What it comes down to is that the business representatives don t want to sit and have business requirements pulled out of them over hours worth of meetings
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 23, 2009
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      "What it comes down to is that the business representatives don't want to sit and have business requirements pulled out of them over hours' worth of meetings over the 3 week iteration period before the next iteration. They want to be able to say we need this kind of thing, give minimal requirements and let the team figure out what that means and come back and ask questions if we need to."

      If the meetings that were happening previously weren't really adding value, then they probably needed to go. If that means there's not as much work for the existing employees, then what they doing before I guess was just waste. Obviously, that sucks for the people who have nothing to do now, and shame on the business for not coping with that well.

      If the now defunct meetings _were_ adding value, then the same employees should have the same amount of work to do, it just may be a little more chaotic since they'll need to go track down the biz reps to get answers to their questions.

      my 2 cents


      On Fri, Oct 23, 2009 at 1:25 PM, Jeanne Hallock <jeanneh@...> wrote:
       

      First let me start off with that my role at my company is UI designer/user experience specialist for a 'silo'ed group with an additional UX group that governs across a large enterprise company. We are, from Nielsen's writing, 10-14 years a way from being a truly user-centered development group. I have worked previously in a dot-com environment, which was an agile shop.
       
      In a couple project groups, one of our business representatives is trying to push our group to be even "more" agile than we have been. We are in an enterprise agile situation, so we have never done what I would call real agile.
       
      What it comes down to is that the business representatives don't want to sit and have business requirements pulled out of them over hours' worth of meetings over the 3 week iteration period before the next iteration. They want to be able to say we need this kind of thing, give minimal requirements and let the team figure out what that means and come back and ask questions if we need to.
       
      Our business analysts are completely freaked out and are trying to talk them out of it. In my attempt/research on the web what the role of the analyst is in agile to help them calm down some, what I have found is pretty much my role, the user experience specialist, is being assigned to the business analyst. I understand that in agile everyone is supposed to do every job to some extent and in a more team-environment I have seen that it works well. So, I don't have a problem with that exactly.
       
      But in the enterprise situation office politics take a heavy toll in many areas. In our case the analysts play a major role politically in the vision and lifecycle process. They are the 'scopers' or the gatekeepers. They often mold and push business towards or away functionality based on judements of value or team cost such that they determine what functionality will really be developed and to what extent.
       
      What I have been reading online basically puts one of us out of business because their agile documentation puts them in user representative role. So what should the role of the analyst in agile when you have a usability/ux person in the mix? How are other companies, especially at the enterprise level handling it?
       
      Thanks in advance,
      Jeanne Hallock
       




      --
      Chris
      http://clabs.org
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