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Agile Team Boilerplate

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  • vasonson
    Hi all - I m new to agile development and I was wondering if anyone has a good boilerplate template they could share that identifies and defines the roles on
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 15, 2009
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      Hi all - I'm new to agile development and I was wondering if anyone has a good boilerplate template they could share that identifies and defines the roles on an agile development team, including those of the customer. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    • William Pietri
      ... There is no generic agile process. So actual roles depend on which agile process you re using. One complicating factor is that the Agile Manifesto
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 16, 2009
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        vasonson wrote:
        > Hi all - I'm new to agile development and I was wondering if anyone has a good boilerplate template they could share that identifies and defines the roles on an agile development team, including those of the customer. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
        >
        >

        There is no generic "agile" process. So actual roles depend on which
        agile process you're using.

        One complicating factor is that the Agile Manifesto elevates
        "individuals and interactions over processes and tools", so there's a
        fair bit of local variance based on what skills and relationships the
        real people involved have. Plus, good agile teams are supposed to
        tinker with their process, so even teams that start out the same way end
        up quite different.

        Was there something in particular you were wondering?

        William
      • Anders Ramsay
        As boilerplates go, one can certainly think of Scrum as a boilerplate planning framework for an Agile team. You could certainly go out and buy a book on Scrum
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 16, 2009
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          As boilerplates go, one can certainly think of Scrum as a boilerplate planning framework for an Agile team.  You could certainly go out and buy a book on Scrum and it would contain lots of very specific instructions.  And you could also go out and buy a book on XP, another boilerplate, which covers a lot of the things that Scrum is silent about.  But Scrum and XP are just instantiations of Agile.  More importantly, by just following instructions on how to do stuff in a "boilerplate" method, you are only going through the motions without understanding the underlying thinking.  And for Agile to be successful, you'll need a team that doesn't just do Agile, but also thinks Agile.  And for that to happen, in my experience, you would likely also need a coach to guide you through your adoption of a boilerplate such as Scrum.

          On Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:56 PM, vasonson <vasonson@...> wrote:
           

          Hi all - I'm new to agile development and I was wondering if anyone has a good boilerplate template they could share that identifies and defines the roles on an agile development team, including those of the customer. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!


        • vasonson
          Thanks William. I knew my question was very general in nature but I needed a place to start. Since this is an agile-usability forum, I am most interested in
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 16, 2009
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            Thanks William. I knew my question was very general in nature but I needed a place to start. Since this is an agile-usability forum, I am most interested in how the user experience team is baked into an agile development team - how does UX work fit into agile? Is this still to broad a question to ask? Thanks again.

            --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, William Pietri <william@...> wrote:
            >
            > vasonson wrote:
            > > Hi all - I'm new to agile development and I was wondering if anyone has a good boilerplate template they could share that identifies and defines the roles on an agile development team, including those of the customer. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
            > >
            > >
            >
            > There is no generic "agile" process. So actual roles depend on which
            > agile process you're using.
            >
            > One complicating factor is that the Agile Manifesto elevates
            > "individuals and interactions over processes and tools", so there's a
            > fair bit of local variance based on what skills and relationships the
            > real people involved have. Plus, good agile teams are supposed to
            > tinker with their process, so even teams that start out the same way end
            > up quite different.
            >
            > Was there something in particular you were wondering?
            >
            > William
            >
          • Rudiger
            ... Some people in the agile world think there is no place for roles and others think there should be. Here are links to two agile flavours that do have role
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 18, 2009
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              --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, "vasonson" <vasonson@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi all - I'm new to agile development and I was wondering if anyone has a good boilerplate template they could share that identifies and defines the roles on an agile development team, including those of the customer. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
              >


              Some people in the agile world think there is no place for roles and others think there should be.

              Here are links to two agile flavours that do have role descriptions:

              Open Unified process (OUP)
              http://epf.eclipse.org/wikis/openup/

              Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM)
              http://www.dsdm.org/atern/roles-responsibilities/
              You need to register.
            • William Pietri
              ... Heh. It s certainly not too broad to ask. However, answering that is a major purpose of this group, so I don t know that we have a short answer for you
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 18, 2009
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                vasonson wrote:
                > Thanks William. I knew my question was very general in nature but I needed a place to start. Since this is an agile-usability forum, I am most interested in how the user experience team is baked into an agile development team - how does UX work fit into agile? Is this still to broad a question to ask? Thanks again.
                >

                Heh. It's certainly not too broad to ask. However, answering that is a
                major purpose of this group, so I don't know that we have a short answer
                for you yet.

                My personal view is that you can divide UX work up into two sorts. The
                division parallels the common Agile division between product management
                and actual construction. Consider this breakdown:

                http://www.jjg.net/elements/pdf/elements.pdf

                I think the top layers, the most concrete ones, are mainly about the
                details of construction, the how of the project. The bottom layers are
                more about who, why, and what, which is what product managers normally
                concern themselves with. So I'd say UX fits in differently depending on
                which layer you're talking about.

                Regardless, I think the way to fit it in is to make sure that your
                project has everybody vital in one room Then have them frequently
                deliver working product -- including to end users -- and regularly
                evaluate both external effects and internal processes.

                That may seem too simple, but teams who appreciate usability will turn
                to the UX people right away. Those that don't need to feel the pain of
                releasing something bad for their users, so they can learn to appreciate
                those people sitting right there with them. :-)

                William
              • vasonson
                Thank you very much for the resource links!
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 19, 2009
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                  Thank you very much for the resource links!

                  --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, "Rudiger" <rudiger.wolf@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, "vasonson" <vasonson@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi all - I'm new to agile development and I was wondering if anyone has a good boilerplate template they could share that identifies and defines the roles on an agile development team, including those of the customer. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  > Some people in the agile world think there is no place for roles and others think there should be.
                  >
                  > Here are links to two agile flavours that do have role descriptions:
                  >
                  > Open Unified process (OUP)
                  > http://epf.eclipse.org/wikis/openup/
                  >
                  > Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM)
                  > http://www.dsdm.org/atern/roles-responsibilities/
                  > You need to register.
                  >
                • vasonson
                  There are many people with deep scars as a result not considering UX before releasing software! Thanks for the insight.
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 19, 2009
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                    There are many people with deep scars as a result not considering UX before releasing software! Thanks for the insight.

                    --- In agile-usability@yahoogroups.com, William Pietri <william@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > vasonson wrote:
                    > > Thanks William. I knew my question was very general in nature but I needed a place to start. Since this is an agile-usability forum, I am most interested in how the user experience team is baked into an agile development team - how does UX work fit into agile? Is this still to broad a question to ask? Thanks again.
                    > >
                    >
                    > Heh. It's certainly not too broad to ask. However, answering that is a
                    > major purpose of this group, so I don't know that we have a short answer
                    > for you yet.
                    >
                    > My personal view is that you can divide UX work up into two sorts. The
                    > division parallels the common Agile division between product management
                    > and actual construction. Consider this breakdown:
                    >
                    > http://www.jjg.net/elements/pdf/elements.pdf
                    >
                    > I think the top layers, the most concrete ones, are mainly about the
                    > details of construction, the how of the project. The bottom layers are
                    > more about who, why, and what, which is what product managers normally
                    > concern themselves with. So I'd say UX fits in differently depending on
                    > which layer you're talking about.
                    >
                    > Regardless, I think the way to fit it in is to make sure that your
                    > project has everybody vital in one room Then have them frequently
                    > deliver working product -- including to end users -- and regularly
                    > evaluate both external effects and internal processes.
                    >
                    > That may seem too simple, but teams who appreciate usability will turn
                    > to the UX people right away. Those that don't need to feel the pain of
                    > releasing something bad for their users, so they can learn to appreciate
                    > those people sitting right there with them. :-)
                    >
                    > William
                    >
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