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Re: [agile-usability] Valuing stories

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  • George Dinwiddie
    ... I d like to hear some stories about that. I suspect I m not envisioning the same situations that you are. ... On the other hand, I ve seen stories grow
    Message 1 of 53 , Sep 6, 2009
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      Adrian Howard wrote:
      > On 6 Sep 2009, at 01:06, George Dinwiddie wrote:
      >
      >> Improving the user experience can be a story. But for it to be a
      >> story,
      >> it has to drive all the way through to functional software. Doing
      >> paper
      >> prototypes is just a task. It don't mean a thing until it gets
      >> realized
      >> in the code.
      >
      > Personally I find user stories that just focus on UX improvements a
      > little bit of a personal red flag. Like refactoring cards they're a
      > sign that we've gone down a bad route for long enough that we can't
      > fix something in-story.

      I'd like to hear some stories about that. I suspect I'm not envisioning
      the same situations that you are.

      > When I start looking at the underlying reason we're having UX-only
      > stories I often find that we've not been paying enough attention to
      > the UX when it comes to the definition of done-done.

      On the other hand, I've seen stories grow huge because of the need to
      match Photoshopped wireframes. And then seen them cycle between dev &
      test as the organization of the wireframe didn't quite match the
      organization of the underlying data in all cases. And developers
      spending large amounts of time trying to duplicate whizz-bang in-browser
      javascript features as specified by the UX designer. In other words,
      I've seen this result in a most un-agile situation because the UX was
      treated as a requirement rather than something designed in conjunction
      with the software.

      I've often thought it was appropriate to split a story to include a
      basic UI that was functional without javascript, and embellishments that
      added to the user experience in Web 2.0 ways.

      - George

      --
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    • Adrian Howard
      ... I think that they re probably an orthogonal dimensions myself. I ve met people who make very good decisions about the design of the code/ ux - but are not
      Message 53 of 53 , Sep 11, 2009
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        On 6 Sep 2009, at 21:27, Hassan Schroeder wrote:

        > On Sat, Sep 5, 2009 at 8:31 PM, William Pietri<william@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        >> .... In fact, teams are doing design all the time. The choice
        >> isn't between designing and not designing; it's between designing
        >> well
        >> and designing poorly.
        >
        > Or between designing consciously and designing unconsciously,
        > the latter being fairly close to "not designing" :-)


        I think that they're probably an orthogonal dimensions myself. I've
        met people who make very good decisions about the design of the code/
        ux - but are not really able to articulate the reasoning behind them
        very well.

        This can be problematical since their decisions can sound arbitrary to
        others - even when they're really good decisions.

        Cheers,

        Adrian

        --
        http://quietstars.com - twitter.com/adrianh - delicious.com/adrianh
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