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Re: [agile-usability] assessing agility

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  • Anders Ramsay
    Hi Dina, As William and others said, talking about a best method is probably not that fruitful. Similar to the saying about politics, all methods are local.
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 13, 2009
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      Hi Dina,

      As William and others said, talking about a "best" method is probably
      not that fruitful. Similar to the saying about politics, all methods
      are local. The method or process that is ideal for your team may not
      be ideal for another team. At the same time, there are definitely
      agile usability patterns that are emerging, but even in those cases,
      when getting into specific methods and activities, I'd say they are
      likely to remain anecdotal and not really become formal best-practice
      patterns (i.e.it works for most teams, most of the time) until having
      been tested in ways similar to the patterns that became Scrum, which
      has been used in thousands of projects since being introduced in '96.
      -Anders


      On Thu, Jul 9, 2009 at 11:54 AM, dina salah<dina_salah_eldin@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi,
      > I am aware of the wide spectrum of proposals, techniques, approaches for
      > improving agile usability, however, i believe that most of the assessements
      > were ancedotal.
      > If anyone has a different opinion kindly share it.
      > What i am asking about is:
      > Among all the suggestions to achieve agile usability, how can u prove that
      > your suggested method is better than any other suggested method?Is it
      > through user/ customer satisfaction? Better Developement team productivity?
      > More Agility? ....
      > And again how do u backup your opinion?
      > Cheers,
      > Dina
      >
      >
      >
    • Jeremy Kriegel
      I think there is an assumption in the prior comments that I d like to call out. It is that you and your team are familiar with UX practices as used in
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 13, 2009
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        I think there is an assumption in the prior comments that I'd like to call out. It is that you and your team are familiar with UX practices as used in non-agile environments. If you are, then it is a case of how to adapt what you know or learn new techniques that will benefit your situation. 

        If, however, you are new to UX in general, you might need to start by learning some of the baseline UX practices. Many of the things that worked outside of agile will still work inside of agile. They may just need to be tweaked in their execution or timing.

        Jeff Patton has put together a fairly generic 2 week process that will cover the UX bases in an agile way. If you need a place to start, consider it. Once you have a baseline, his or your own, you can start evolving it to meet your specific needs. I can't find a blog post where he spells it out, but this one is close (http://www.agileproductdesign.com/blog/emerging_best_agile_ux_practice.html). You may just need to go to one of his workshops, however, if you digest most of his writings, you'll have a good sense for what he will present.

        -jer

        "Be well, do good work & keep in touch."
            - Garrison Keillor


        On Mon, Jul 13, 2009 at 1:14 PM, Anders Ramsay <andersr@...> wrote:


        Hi Dina,

        As William and others said, talking about a "best" method is probably
        not that fruitful. Similar to the saying about politics, all methods
        are local. The method or process that is ideal for your team may not
        be ideal for another team. At the same time, there are definitely
        agile usability patterns that are emerging, but even in those cases,
        when getting into specific methods and activities, I'd say they are
        likely to remain anecdotal and not really become formal best-practice
        patterns (i.e.it works for most teams, most of the time) until having
        been tested in ways similar to the patterns that became Scrum, which
        has been used in thousands of projects since being introduced in '96.
        -Anders



        On Thu, Jul 9, 2009 at 11:54 AM, dina salah<dina_salah_eldin@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hi,
        > I am aware of the wide spectrum of proposals, techniques, approaches for
        > improving agile usability, however, i believe that most of the assessements
        > were ancedotal.
        > If anyone has a different opinion kindly share it.
        > What i am asking about is:
        > Among all the suggestions to achieve agile usability, how can u prove that
        > your suggested method is better than any other suggested method?Is it
        > through user/ customer satisfaction? Better Developement team productivity?
        > More Agility? ....
        > And again how do u backup your opinion?
        > Cheers,
        > Dina
        >
        >
        >


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